Some drawings of chickens

Wed 31 Mar 2021 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Since last summer when Kelly got her half-dozen pandemic chickens I’ve been trying to draw them — with the expected level of success. Most of the drawings were recycled but a few (see the middle one below) I liked and kept. This last weekend, after maundering around for months of not doing it I got Ursula (below left) and Kelly (below right) to draw some chickens and at last made a tiny zine which is available here.

Chicken by Ursula Chicken by Gavin Chicken by Kelly



Spring Zines & Postcards

Thu 2 May 2019 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

I just added the zines Kelly and Ursula made in March to the site: Horoscope Stories, I Hear You’re Working on a Novel, Writing Rules, & Monster Land, as well as the Horoscope Postcards made from Ursula’s illustrations of Kelly’s stories. All the info is on this page:

Spring zines



Clamor

Mon 4 Nov 2013 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

This post is inspired by two things: first, reading Anne Elizabeth Moore’s fabulous zine Cambodia Grrl and an Indiegogo campaign to digitize the Clamor backlist.

I was just wondering the other day if there are magazines today similar to some I really miss: Clamor, Herbivore, Punk PlanetVenus. Not to mention Peko Peko, dammit!

I liked their mix of politics, food, and music. And since my New Yorker subscription is coming to an end and (boo hoo!) I’m not renewing it because of their pathetic Vida scores [Bylines, Briefly Noted, Overall], I’m looking around to see if I can find indie magazines coming from the edges of things, rather than bam! in the center.

I read a fair number of mags, but any suggestions are welcome because one thing I know, I am missing a lot, too!



Trunk Stories

Mon 20 May 2013 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

In the mail today, copies of Trunk Stories, a zine from our friend William Smith of Hangfire Books. We’re going to be sending out copies with LCRW and other books. Extras that are excellent? Yay!

Trunk Stories



Alan, John, Vincent, Elissa, Bruce & Henry, & more

Wed 25 Nov 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Publishing seems to take today off as part of the Thanksgiving holiday—maybe everyone on NYC is taking the day off to empty the oven of books so that they can try and cook a turkey?—but we in indie press land don’t recognize your bourgeois concept of “holidays.” All days are holidays here!

And in the meantime, coming up soon we have an interview with Daniel Rabuzzi author of The Choir Boats and we’re looking forward to the new issue of Xerography Debt (with a few reviews by yours truly).

Hilarious post by Elissa Bassist: What We Were Really Saying:

Me
I verb you.

Him
I similarly feel for you in this way, but I’ll never say the word verb in front of you or even behind your back to my friends. I have feelings only sometimes, and only when I feel like it.

Elsewhere, tangentially related to SBP: Alan DeNiro (Skinny Dipping…) is celebrating the release of his first novel, Total Oblivion, More or Less, by hosting a fundraiser for MercyCorps—and if you donate and send Alan an email he’ll send you a piece of postapocalytic ephemera.

Bruce Sterling gives the Wired thumbs up to Henry Jenkins intro to Interfictions 2: “Man, Henry Jenkins is the guru.”

Nice review of Hound:

Hound is a leisurely mystery, the action is secondary to the pace of life, the thoughtfulness, the focus on books and things literary. This isn’t fast-paced, action-filled. The story develops at it’s own pace, not to be rushed but rather to be savored. Indeed, the crime-solving is secondary to the portrayal of Henry, the sensitive bibliophile’s efforts to make sense of life. This is a “literary” novel with a mystery inside. It’s full of asides and memories of the character’s youth. The reader needs to relax and enjoy. Initially, I wasn’t sure I was going to like this, but my affection for this book and it’s characters grew as I read, until by the end I was quite satisfied. I look forward to the next in this different, intriguing series.

This generic image should make people rethink getting shiny new electronics for Xmas:

http://www.booksequalgifts.com/banners/Book_and_Bow.jpg

John Kessel (The Baum Plan…) is interviewed at Marshall’s Sekrit Clubhouse (shh, it’s a secret!) and can be seen on UNC TV’s Bookwatch here:

John Kessel
Play Video


Michael wants to provoke you

Thu 30 Jul 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

Go read this great angry rant by Michael about the choices we all make every day, their ramifications, and the importance of reconsidering them every so often. What’s your footprint? The starving musk oxen of today are the abandoned water-starved cities of tomorrow:

You’ve probably heard by now about the Bush Administration covering up evidence of melting icecaps.

20,000 musk oxen starved to death in the arctic because of a phenomenon called a “rain on snow event”. Rain falls on snow, turns to ice. Oxen come by and try to dig with their hooves for the grass under the snow. But they can’t break the ice. So they die.

Learn the rules of recycling in your town, and follow them, for real, all the time. If you work in a different town than you live in, learn those rules too. Hassle your co-workers about it. If they see you picking their plastic and aluminum out of the trash enough times, they’ll quit throwing it away out of guilt. I’ve seen it happen. No, you should not feel guilty for making other people feel guilty. Guilt is the only thing that’s going to get anybody to change.

Then check out one of Michael’s takes on the future post-collapse: take a trip down the river in  “Starlings” on Abyss and Apex.



Following Ray

Wed 29 Jul 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 3 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

Ray Vukcevich, Meet Me in the Moon RoomI emailed Ray Vukcevich recently about another of his stories from Meet Me in the Moon Room selling to a Japanese magazine (“No Comet” will be either the third or fourth, can’t remember) and he mentioned that he’d just had a story published on Smokelong Quarterly (don’t like the name). His story, “A Funny Smell,” is a short blast of displacement, philosophy, faith, and laughs—a typical Vukcevichian moment—and there’s an interview to go with it.

The ToC at the bottom of the page (smart design!) listed a Dan Chaon story, “The Hobblers,” and Dan’s always worth reading so I read that—the time dilation and emotional weight was a little similar in effect to some of Ray’s stories—and then the interview with Dan.

Await Your Reply CoverSince I’d read a couple of stories by two guys I knew I thought I should try some people I didn’t, so I skimmed through a few and liked “Me and Theodore Are Trapped in the Trunk of the Car with Rags in Our Mouths and Tape Around Our Wrists and Ankles, Please Let Us Out” by Mary Hamilton which has a brilliant opening, “I built a bridge and named it Samuel.”, and continues in a mad rush that works and “Rats” by Z. Z. Boone (spoiler: the rats don’t make it).

Then I went back to Dan’s interview which mentions he has a new novel out this September (Await Your Reply) and I would be remiss not to point out here that there is a sort of tuckerization in there that will jump out to people that us and make them laugh.

Lies Will Take You Somewhere CoverIn his interview, though, there’s a link to an essay published on The Rumpus, “What Happened to Sheila.” Which is heartbreaking and should be read. And there there’s a link to Sheila Schwartz’s novel Lies Will Take You Somewhere which came out in April from Etruscan Press and which PW called “a strong debut novel.”

For a taste of Sheila’s work I followed the link (still on Rumpus) to a story by her, “Three Cancer Patients Walk Into a Bar” which is tough and wickedly smart. Sheila’s writing is an acquired taste but it’s good, strong stuff and I recommend you give it a shot.



Ready to burn up this summer?

Thu 18 Jun 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

issue preview Steve Berman has put out the first issue of a new magazine, Icarus, through Magcloud, one of those Web 2.1 long tail site thingies where you can publish what you like on any scale. Since niche mags are dying off like dinosaurs after a meteor crash, it will be interesting to see how this develops.Not sure if we will put out LCRW through them the way we did with Lulu; the ebook + zine format ($5 vs. $13) works quite well at the moment.

Not sure if you can subscribe or not, but you can preview and order the first issue here:

Icarus is the first magazine devoted to gay-themed speculative fiction and writing – from fantasy to horror to science fiction, and all the weird tales that fall between the cracks. Our first issue features short stories by Jeff Mann, Joel D. Lane, Jameson Currier and Tom Cardamone; interviews with Dan Stone and graphic artist Peter Grahame; poetry by Lawrence M. Schoen; plus book reviews, an article about the Gaylactic Network, and brief happenings in gay publishing. Icarus is published by Lethe Press.



The Lone Star Stories Reader

Sun 16 Nov 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The Lone Star Stories Reader CoverEric Marin of Lone Star Stories just sent along a couple of copies of The Lone Star Stories Reader which has stories by Martha Wells, Nina Kiriki Hoffman, Gavin J. Grant, M. Thomas, Sarah Monette, Catherynne M. Valente, Tim Pratt, “Manuscript Found Written in the Paw Prints of a Stoat” by Samantha Henderson, and an Introduction by Sherwood Smith. We’d recommend you order it direct from the source but it looks like Eric decided not to do that any more. Can’t think why! The book looks good and has received some really good pre-publication reviews:

“From both established talents like Nina Kiriki Hoffman and relative newcomers like Marguerite Reed, these stories offer a wide enough range to keep the reader fumbling to find some commonality other than editor Marin’s excellent taste. Hoffman’s contribution, the short and sweet “Seasonal Work,” is the holiday retail season seen through a very strange lens—the kind of thing she does so well. Reed’s gorgeous “Angels of a Desert Heaven” is the story of a musician and a Hopi seer and the ways the gods of their shared desert home adopt even the Anglo, if the need is great enough. Despite the book’s title, the stories don’t have any Texas connections, though several take place in various Western settings. Title and stories come from the Web zine Lone Star Stories, where the latter are electronically archived. At any rate, this selection suggests that LSS is a force to be reckoned with.”
Booklist

“In Catherynne M. Valente’s stunning ‘Thread: A Triptych,’ a fantastical mail-order bride is brought to the ‘real’ world, only to be cast aside. The western meets dark fantasy in Martha Wells’s standout ‘Wolf Night,’ when a group of people barricaded in a stockade are attacked by an otherworldly creature. Other standouts include Ekaterina Sedia’s ‘The Disemboweler,’ where a robot explores a world where little spirits animate machines, and Sarah Monette’s ‘A Night in Electric Squidland,’ where two queer psychic cops infiltrate an occult BDSM nightclub…. the gems really shine.”
Publishers Weekly



Get The Homeless Moon

Wed 16 Jul 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Chapbook CoverHere’s a fun thing for Readercon: pick up your copy of Michael J. DeLuca et al.’s new chapbook, Homeless Moon, which these crazy kids will be giving away for free. Free. Don’t they know that no one has any money in this crap economy and they can’t afford books…. Oh yeah, free.

We have a couple of copies at the office and it’s pretty! If you aren’t going to the convention (and it’s apparently nearly sold out, so register if you are going), you can either download a free PDF of the chapboor or send them a buck for postage and get the book mailed to you. Can’t beat that.



Sending you away

Mon 9 Jun 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Strange Horizonsover here where they have neat stuff. Yes, it’s Strange Horizons and their yearly fund drive. We were late to the party sending them prizes but they should be added this week. Looks like this year there are even more ways to get prizes: bonus prizes as certain totals are reached, prizes for blogs who link to it (come on LA Times, you know you want the 5 CD Escape Pod set too!), and, you know, for sending money.

If you’d like an advance reading copy of Ben Rosenbaum’s debut collection, The Ant King and Other Stories, or Kelly’s new collection, Pretty Monsters, or would like the chocolate-bar LCRW subscription, go donate and maybe these prizes will become yourn.



Recent reads

Wed 24 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Xerography Debt #22 COVERThere’s a new issue of Xerography Debt—”the review zine with perzine tendencies.” Available at Atomic Books, Quimby’s, etc! It’s a great place to find new things to read which haven’t been okayed by Rupert Murdoch, etc.

You can order it here or, if you like that PDF thing, you can get the Whole Thing for Free. Which means you saved some $$ you can go spend on other zines, right?



The day’s mail

Thu 28 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The last issue of Punk Planet (order) came in — which is always a great read and is incredibly frustrating that it had to stop. There’s a great review of Liz Hand’s Generation Loss (any other music mags want a copy? email us)

“A literary page-turner of impressive thematic heft and cohesion, illuminating surprising insights on the relationship between art and imitation, death and photgraphy, and art and madness.”

Part of the frustration with losing the zine is the ads. There aren’t that many places where you see ads from tiny bands and zines, so this was one way to keep up (interested or not) with what other people are doing out there.

The Privilege of the Sword CoverOk, so. Next exciting thing: the mass market paperback of Ellen Kushner’s The Privilege of the Sword. This is the original mannerpunk Young Trollopian interstitial novel. Katherine’s uncle invites her to live with him in the city. While she envisions dancing the night away the reality is quite different. Ellen’s take on the unexpected ways the adolescent years can take you is quite wonderful. Also, Ellen reports the trade paperback has just gone back to press, which is lovely news. Our hardcover edition is puttering along nicely. Doubt we’ll ever reprint it, but it sure is fun to make books like that.

Lastly, not actually in the mail pile, just finished Nancy Farmer’s brilliant follow up to The Sea of Trolls, The Land of the Silver Apples. More on this book later. Just to say, if you liked the first this one is—without denigrating the first—even better. Farmer enriches the world, folds back unexpected corners of history, and joins threads of stories in the most beautiful and unexpected ways.



Punk Planet: RIP

Mon 18 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

In the office for a couple of days (with a KGB visit interstitialed in there on Wednesday) before heading to DC for ALA on Friday (say hi if you’re there). Acronymed to death, anyone?

Punk Planet just pulled the plug on it’s zine, bah fkn humbug. It was a great fun mag with good pieces on all aspects of indie culture. Another death-by-distributor tale. Best of luck with the books!

These are pretty desperate times for indie culture. It’s (somewhat) easy enough to start something—we did it while knowing nothing. Keeping it going while being, er, nibbled to death by ducks? Not always easy.

The usual “clarion” call: if you like a zine, subscribe. Shop the McSweeney’s and Soft Skull sales.

But don’t wait until a press or bookshop you like is desperate. If you buy this $14.95 book from Amazon for 32% off:

The Best of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet (Paperback)
by Kelly Link & Gavin J. Grant


List Price $14.95
Price $10.17
You Save $4.78 (32%)

That’s great! You only pay $10.71 (Hey, buy 2.) But that 32% you’re saving doesn’t come from Amazon: that cut is from the publisher. The publisher still has to give Amazon a huge discount (so that they can pass it on — and not selling on Amazon, well, let’s suppose that argument is over already) and pay all the other usual people. Hello printer!

How about if you buy that same book at your local book store (which probably has a frequent buyer card of some kind to offer you 10% off)? Then that 22-32% goes back to the bookshop (paying smart people in your town to sell books: how cool is that?) and a slice of it goes back to the publisher, who need every % they can get.

Every dollar is a political act.

More LCRW stuff:

We will post the Best of LCRW table of contents soon. Promise!

Submissions are running about 1,500 per year. So we are falling further behind and wow are they piling up. Not sure what we can do. Reading periods? Charge to submit? (That is a joke, by the way.) 1500 stories a year (and only going to rise) is a chunk of time. Suggestions appreciated.



O.King’s “The Cure”

Sat 28 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The new issue of One Story came in the mail which reminded us of how much we had enjoyed the previous one:

Issue #85, December 20, 2006 The Cure” by Owen King

Don’t go read the interview if you haven’t read the story. But, go read the story if you haven’t read the interview.

Who will like this? Barb, I think.



Tue 24 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sybil wants you.

Sybil’s Garage No. 4 Spring is here, the weather is warm, but don’t forget! It’s your last chance to get Sybil’s Garage at the discounted rate. This discount expires on May 1st. Follow this link now and get 20% off Sybil’s Garage No. 4

Look: it’s pretty (colorrrrr), comes with a free chapbook, and has an interview with Jeff “NO BS” Ford, as well as a whole bunch of prose and poems by peeps you like. You. Pretty! Buy!

Right, that’s done and their sales will be through the roof. Next?

Wait, it this mic still on? Crap.



Tue 24 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sybil wants you.

Sybil’s Garage No. 4 Spring is here, the weather is warm, but don’t forget! It’s your last chance to get Sybil’s Garage at the discounted rate. This discount expires on May 1st. Follow this link now and get 20% off Sybil’s Garage No. 4

Look: it’s pretty (colorrrrr), comes with a free chapbook, and has an interview with Jeff “NO BS” Ford, as well as a whole bunch of prose and poems by peeps you like. You. Pretty! Buy!

Right, that’s done and their sales will be through the roof. Next?

Wait, it this mic still on? Crap.



World Fantasy Noms

Sun 6 Aug 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Nominations for the World Fantasy Award are out. Congrats to all the nominees, including Kelly Link whose collection, Magic for Beginners and her novella of the same name are up.

It’s a refreshing list with tons of good stuff on it. Wonder if H. Murakami will make it to the convention?

Speaking of Murakami (poor segues, the first sign of blogarrhea?), just read the Cloverfield Press edition of his story “Tony Takitani” (trans by Jay Rubin). Ordered it at AWP in March and even though it came a little while ago it somehow never managed to crawl near the top of the unending reading pile until now. First the book: it’s a beautifully made and designed objets d’fetish (no page numbers!).  The story, originally published in The New Yorker, is one of Murakami’s restrained wonders. It’s a soft, lonely story of art, marriage, and a Fitgeraldian quantity of dresses all in a lovely little edition.

Another beautiful thing that came to hand while tidying is The Monkeynauts, a nonfiction zine (as typed by bombo the monkey) about some of the monkeys who went (were sent) to space. It’s a series of incredible, thought-provoking stories — one monkey who, upon being rescued from his landing capsule, ran around ecstatically shaking everyone’s hands…! And again with the beautifully made thing. Got this one in a small stack from the catastrophe shop, a great resource for minicomics. (Because Quimby’s Atomic, Million Year Picnic, etc. aren’t enough??)



Writer Rowe

Wed 8 Feb 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Apex Digest just posted their Feb. ish and the writer of the month is Christopher Rowe. Read an interview, a new short, “Queen of the Moon,” and, from Bittersweet Creek,Men of Renown.” Chunk of interview:

Apex: You publish a critically acclaimed small press magazine titled Say…. What are your thoughts about the supposed impending doom of the small press, and literary digests/zines in general?

C.Rowe: I hadn’t heard about the impending doom of the small press, just plenty of talk about the impending doom of the, well, I guess you’d call it the medium press now. Asimov’s, Analog, those guys if we’re talking about genre fiction magazines. And sure, those magazines are going to have to do something pretty drastic pretty quickly (luckily, I’m not in a position where I’m required to identify the something) to survive while looking anything like what they do now. As for the small press and literary magazines in general, pshaw. “This is the golden age of the small press.” Jim Minz, big deal New York editor, said that and he only lies about half the time.