Surprise! We have books on sale!

Sat 4 Dec 2010 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Here!

New hardcovers 40% off!
New paperbacks 30%+ off!
Daily Planner: $9.95
Preorders: 25% off!
Backlist: heavily discounted!

And, there are extra extra multiple purchase opportunities!

—Buy 5 books (can be 5 of the same title of if you are so inclined) and get 1 of these books free (please include it in the “comments” field or email your choice to us): Hound, The Poison Eaters, The King’s Last Song, The Baum Plan for Financial Independence, Endless Things, Kalpa Imperial, The Mount
—Buy 10 books and get 2 of these books free!
—Buy 15 books and get 4 of these books free!
—Buy 20 books and we will be seriously impressed and you can choose 6 of these books free!

We offer you large percentages that stay in your wallet and Media Mail shipping is free in the USA as usual!

The sale is here here here

Don’t want all that paper? Go Weightless. Read more



Some Notes on the Belgian School of the Strange (3) by Edward Gauvin

Fri 3 Dec 2010 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Author

Some  Notes on the Belgian School of the Strange (3) by Edward Gauvin (translator of Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud’s A Life on Paper: Stories)

That her father was a poet and her mother one of Belgium’s greatest novelists may have influenced Anne Richter’s predilections, but the place she has made for herself in Belgian letters is one all her own. In 1954, she burst onto the scene with her very first book, Le Fourmi a fait le coup [literally, The Ant Did It, the “It” in question being what the butler is usually accused of], a collection of fantastical short stories whose protagonists were often animals or objects. Her story “Un sommeil de plante” from her 1967 collection Les Locataires appears in Kim Connell’s 1998 anthology The Belgian School of the Bizarre as “The Dreaming Plant,” and with its central conceit of a woman turning into a plant recalls Kathe Koja’s “The Neglected Garden,” from her 1997 collection Extremities, and reprinted in the Vandermeers’ anthology The New Weird. In Richter’s story, however, the transformation is a serene escape: through it, the heroine dodges marriage and finds the solitude she has always sought: Read more



Treasure Island by Vincent McCaffrey

Thu 2 Dec 2010 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 3 Comments| Posted by: Author

Treasure Island by Vincent McCaffrey

I had been reading purposefully on my own for little more than a year when my family moved to a temporary residence at the Bevan Hotel on Park Street in Larchmont. My parents had bought their first house, an older Victorian, and naturally encountered the unexpected difficulties of renovation.

I have used that nearly six-month residence at the Bevan Hotel several times in stories, and key to the impact of the place was the owner, a man about whom I actually know almost nothing.

His name was Frederick Merrow. I have no picture of him now to compare with my memory, so that I see him in my mind somewhat mythically. In any case, what a boy sees in a man has little to do with fact. We often only see what we need in others and little more. Read more



Some Notes on the Belgian School of the Strange (2) by Edward Gauvin

Wed 1 Dec 2010 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 4 Comments| Posted by: Author

Some  Notes on the Belgian School of the Strange (2) by Edward Gauvin (translator of Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud’s A Life on Paper: Stories)

In Fernand Dumont’s Treatise on Fairies, a brief pamphlet of some twenty pages, we learn, among other things:

  1. A fairy never wears black, brown, red, or violet.
  2. A fairy has to speak but a word, and a fine dust—that of forgetfulness—falls over everything you’ve ever heard up to that moment. Read more


An Embarrassment of Riches by Vincent McCaffrey

Wed 1 Dec 2010 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Author

An Embarrassment of Riches by Vincent McCaffrey

I read recently in the Boston Globe that there is too much information. ‘Information overload’ it was called. I am sure the author was speaking from her own point of view, and as a subjective problem, I cannot judge this. But as a generalization of fact, the theory is faulty in too many ways to address in a short essay. It reminds me of the line in the movie ‘Amadeus’ where the Austrian Emperor Joseph II says there are “simply too many notes” in the great composer’s music. Read more



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