Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 40

October 2019

November 19, 2019. 60 pages. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731623

Fracking? Secret International Conspiracy to Topple Democracy? Rotten to the Core?

Nope.

The contents of occasional outburst of hope and joy and fabulous fiction were produced under pressure and are the stronger for it.

Reviews

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet is a strange and fantastic magazine, and I recommend a subscription to anyone who is on your list but also difficult to predict.”
Vernacular Books

“This year my favorite story [from LCRW] was Frances Rowat’s ‘Ink, and Breath, and Spring’, a lovely, mysterious, and sad mystery story, about a murdered and flensed man found in the gardens of a strange library, and the way a groundskeeper somewhat unwillingly finds out what happened.”
— Rich Horton, Locus

Table of Contents

fiction

Frances Rowat, “Ink, and Breath, and Spring”
Fred Nadis, “The Giant Jew”
Amber Burke, “In Pictures”
T. S. McAdams, “Duck Circles”
Margo Langan, “More Information to Help You Get to Rookwood”
Mary Cool, “The Fruit That Bears the Flower”
Lisa Martin, “Seat Belt On, Falling”
Jeff Benz, “The Stone People”
Michael Byers, “Sibling Rivalry”

nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling
About These Authors

poetry

D. A. Xiaolin Spires, “Planetary Refuse: A Flurry of Haiku”

cover

Cat Mallard, “Moon Garden”

About

This is Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet issue number 40, November 2019. ISSN 1544-7782. Ebook ISBN: 9781618731623. Text: Bodoni Book. Titles: Imprint MT Shadow. LCRW is (usually) published in June and November by Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027 · [email protected] · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw. twitter.com/smallbeerpress · Printed at Paradise Copies (paradisecopies.com · 413-585-0414). Print subscriptions: $20/4 issues. Please make checks to Small Beer Press. Library & institutional subscriptions are available through EBSCO. LCRW is available as a DRM-free ebook through weightlessbooks.com, &c. Contents © 2019 the authors. All rights reserved. Cover illustration “Moon Garden” © 2019 by Cat Mallard. Thank you authors, artists, and readers. Please send submissions (we are always especially seeking weird and interesting work from women writers and writers of color), guideline requests, &c. to the address above. Peace.

About these Authors

Jeff Benz lives in Long Island and works as a freelance court reporter in Manhattan. “The Stone People” is adapted from a chapter of his novel, Over a Thousand Sleepless Nights.

Amber Burke is a graduate of both Yale and the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars. She lives in New Mexico, where she teaches writing, yoga, and coordinates the Holistic Health and Healing Arts Program at UNM Taos. She is a regular contributor to Yoga International and her stories and essays have been published in The Sun, The Superstition Review, The Michigan Quarterly Review, The Raleigh Review, Essays and Fictions, Sky Island Journal, and The Pinch, among others.

Michael Byers has taught creative writing at the MFA program of the University of Michigan since 2006. He is the author of The Coast of Good Intentions (stories) and two novels, Long for This World and Percival’s Planet. His stories have been anthologized several times in The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Awards, and his novella “The Broken Man” was a finalist for the World Fantasy Award.

Mary Cool is editor in chief of Ducts literary magazine at ducts.org and hosts the Trumpet Fiction reading series in New York City. Her fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in the journals Hogglepot, Storychord, and Barely South Review. She lives with her husband and two daughters in Brooklyn, New York.

Nicole Kimberling lives in Washington state.

A deep love of both stories and nature have been with Cat Mallard since childhood, she credits this to being an only child spending time either outdoors or at the large city library. She is a life long Florida resident and studied art at the University of Florida. She lives in North Florida in a wooded area with her family and little pup. You can find more of her work at catmallard.com.

Lisa Martin lives in San Francisco where she works at book shop and attends City College to study journalism and graphic design. Her non-fiction articles have appeared in Make: Magazine, but this is the first time her fiction has appeared in print. You can find her on twitter at @ReesesMartin.

T. S. McAdams lives with his wife, son, and bullmastiffs in the San Fernando Valley, where he is not working on a screenplay. His work has appeared in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Madcap Review, Santa Monica Review, Pembroke, Jersey Devil Press, Sierra Nevada Review, Exposition Review, and Faultline.

Fred Nadis has been a limousine driver, college professor, and dried fig bandit (he’d give them back if he could). He has published pieces in the Atlantic, Vanity Fair online, and many literary journals. He is the interviewee for wired.com’s Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast #182. His book, The Man from Mars: Ray Palmer’s Amazing Pulp Journey was a Locus Nonfiction Award Finalist in 2014.

Frances Rowat lives in Ontario with her husband, their dog, and a not-quite-startling number of cats. She was born in Canada, and while growing up spent time in England, Algeria, and Switzerland. She spends most of her time behind a keyboard, where she frequently gets lost in details. She enjoys earrings, fountain pens, rain, and post-apocalyptic settings, and can be found online on Twitter @aphotic_ink or at aphotic-ink.com.

D. A. Xiaolin Spires steps into portals and reappears in sites such as Hawai’i, NY, various parts of Asia and elsewhere, with her keyboard appendage attached. Her work appears or is forthcoming in publications such as Clarkesworld, Analog, Strange Horizons, Nature, Terraform, Grievous Angel, Fireside, Galaxy’s Edge, StarShipSofa, Andromeda Spaceways (Year’s Best Issue), Diabolical Plots, Factor Four, Shoreline of Infinity, LONTAR, Mithila Review, Star*Line, Polu Texni, Eye to the Telescope, and numerous anthologies. Her stories are available or forthcoming in German, Vietnamese or Estonian translation. She can be found on Twitter: @spireswriter and on her website: daxiaolinspires.wordpress.com.

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