Kelly Link Bio

by Kelly Link

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a short biography of Ms. Kelly Link

Kelly Link’s debut collection, Stranger Things Happen, was a Firecracker nominee, a Village Voice Favorite Book and a Salon Book of the Year — Salon called the collection “…an alchemical mixture of Borges, Raymond Chandler, and “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” Stories from the collection have won the Nebula, the James Tiptree Jr., and the World Fantasy Awards.

Her second collection, Magic for Beginners, was a Book Sense pick (and a Best of Book Sense pick); and selected for best of the year lists byTime Magazine, Salon, Boldtype, Village Voice, San Francisco Chronicle, and The Capitol Times. It was published in paperback by Harcourt.

Kelly is an editor for the Online Writing Workshop and has been a reader and judge for various literary awards. With Gavin J. Grant and Ellen Datlow she edits The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror (St. Martin’s Press). She also edited the anthology, Trampoline.

Kelly has visited a number of schools and workshops including Stonecoast in Maine, Washington University, Yale, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, Brookdale Community College, Brookdale, NJ, Lenoir-Rhyne College, Hickory, NC, the Imagination Workshop at Cleveland State University, New England Institute of Art & Communications, Brookline, MA, Clarion East at Michigan State University, Clarion West in Seattle, WA, and Clarion South in Brisbane, Australia.

Kelly lives in Northampton, MA. She received her BA from Columbia University and her MFA from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Kelly and her husband, Gavin J. Grant, publish a twice-yearly zine, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet — as well as books — as Small Beer Press.

Low resolution (for web use only) author photos. Links below are for high-resolution print-ready versions.(T-shirt — always — Gama-Go.)

Credit: Courtesy of the author.

Click here for hi-res download

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Kelly Link is represented by:

Renee Zuckerbrot
Renee Zuckerbrot Literary Agency
115 West 29th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10001
(212) 967-0072
(212) 967-0073
rene[email protected]

Foreign Rights:

Jenny Meyer
Jenny Meyer Literary Agency, Inc.
115 West 29th St., 10th Flr
NY, NY 10001
(212) 564-9898

Asia:
Whitney Lee
The Fielding Agency, LLC.
269 South Beverly Drive, #341
Beverly Hills, CA 90212
310.276.7517

Film rights:

Sarah Self
The Gersh Agency
41 Madison Avenue, 33rd Floor
New York, NY 10010


Kelly and friend pose at a Japanese subway stop (1998)



Stranger Things Happen – Reviews

by Kelly Link

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stranger things happen by Kelly Link

2001 Year’s Best Lists:
Salon
The Village Voice San Francisco Chronicle
Fantastic Metropolis: Cory Doctorow, Jeffrey Ford, L.Timmel Duchamp, Luis Rodrigues
Locus Best Book of 2001 |
Locus Recommended Reading List: John Clute, Gardner Dozois, Charles N. Brown, Faren Miller
Also, noted in: Publishers Weekly

Awards:
Salon Book of the Year | “Louise’s Ghost” — Nebula Award
| “The Specialist’s Hat” — World Fantasy Award | “Travels with the Snow Queen” — Tiptree Award | World Fantasy Award Nominee | Firecracker Alternative Book Award Nominee

reviews

“my favorite fantasy writer, Miss Kelly Link”
– Alan Cheuse, NPR, All Things Considered, June 2003

China Mieville’s list of books to read

Philadelphia City Paper, Sept. 26, 2002
New York Magazine, February 11, 2002
San Francisco Chronicle, Sunday November 18, 2001
New York Times Book Review, Sunday November 11, 2001
Washington Post
Science Fiction Weekly
Ink19
A review in Hebrew — any translations?

Strange Horizons
Tangentonline

Gadfly Online
Locus
Science Fiction Chronicle
F&SF
Montreal Mirror
one in Finnish!

Eclectica Review, 7/05
[Link's] stories go in places you never thought of, never imagined. Her talent is clear and obvious but her stories are often mysterious and even frightening…. [Stranger Things Happen] is a collection that defies genre assignment and stereotyping, that insists instead that it simply be read and enjoyed.

The Cleveland Plain Dealer
Stranger Things Happen (Small Beer Press, $16) by Kelly Link is a delightful collection of short stories set in a familiar-seeming world.These stories have a dreamy quality, and like traditional fairy tales, Link’s often end with a Grimm little twist.
“Shoe and Marriage” borrows more than a bit from the story of Cinderella, and “Travels With the Snow Queen” and “Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose” play on fairy-tale titles and content. There is also a recurring character, the Girl Detective, who is a lot like a twentysomething Nancy Drew.
Link’s stories include lots of fairy-tale staples like ghosts, stepmothers and talking ravens. Still, her characters’ fears more often involve parents, careers, relationships and being left than things that make noises in the night.
We are still afraid of poisoned needles, strangers who offer candy to children, and what a mirror might say when we look into it.
But the things that haunt Link’s characters are more subtle; they are the kinds of things that really do keep people awake at night and leave them hungry for a comforting word.
And no matter how odd the events in her stories may seem, as this book’s title says, stranger things happen.

The Miami Herald, May 25, 2002
Sinister. Dreamy. Supernatural. Link’s stories dazzle even as they unsettle. It’s hard to imagine anything stranger than a multi-legged beauty contestant, a noseless, nimble-fingered father with a collection of metal and wood prosthetics or a deceased man mailing letters to his widow from a netherworld bordered by a nappy ocean with teeth. And that’s for starters. The bizarre atmospherics within these stories are driven as much by what is left unexplained, as in The Specialist’s Hat, where two identical 10-year-olds move to a dark mausoleum of a house with their father after their mother’s death. The first sentence spotlights the Samantha twin while she speculates that ”when you’re Dead, you don’t have to brush your teeth.” The Claire twin chimes in with ”when you’re Dead, you live in a box, and it’s always dark, but you’re not ever afraid.” In this fashion, the twins’ fates are foreshadowed but never quite delineated, as their transformation, of sorts, takes place off the page. Link blends myths, ghosts and alien landscapes with a healthy ladle of modern life for stories that at first confound but eventually order themselves into a titillating weirdness.

Rain Taxi
Link’s stories defy explanation, or at least, brief summary, instead working on the plane between dream and cognitive dissonance. They are true to themselves: witty, beautiful, funny, and startling.

Asimov’s
[H]er writing belongs in the same camp as Jonathan Carroll’s: spooky, indeterminate, a kind of exemplar of literary Heisenbergism. The more you push on any one dimension of her eerie, funny tales, seeking to know the unknowables she deftly sketches, the less you know about other slippery aspects of the text. Link is a fantasist in the grand tradition of Carol Emshwiller, John Crowley, and Robert Coover, blurring the lines between dreams, myths, and reality in exciting new ways. All this talent is on display in Stranger Things Happen, an astonishingly good collection — which gathers her World Fantasy Award winner “The Specialist’s Hat,” plus two stories new to the world, as well as eight others — into an assemblage of awesome proportions. From its campy retro Nancy Drew-style cover to its closing credits, this is a postmodern fairy-tale landmark.

Booklist
Link offers strange and tantalizing stories — contemporary fiction with a fairy-tale ambience — that explore the relationship between loss and death and the many ways we try to cope with both. She boldly weaves myth and fairy tale into contemporary life, drawing inspiration from the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, from the fairy tale of Cinderella, from the writings of C. S. Lewis, and from the true story of the Donner party’s descent into cannibalism. Meet Humphrey, one of Zeus’ many illegitimate sons, and June, his girlfriend, who decides to travel to Hades to bring Humphrey back. Learn the rules of being dead, and find out what really happened between Kay and the Snow Queen. Ask yourself what would have happened to the prince if he had never found the girl whose foot fit the glass slipper. Link uses the nonsensical to illuminate truth, blurring the distinctions between the mundane and the fantastic to tease out the underlying meanings of modern life.

Publishers Weekly
The 11 fantasies in this first collection from rising star Link are so quirky and exuberantly imagined that one is easily distracted from their surprisingly serious underpinnings of private pain and emotional estrangement. In “Water Off a Black Dog’s Back,” a naïve young man who has never known personal loss finds that the only way he can curry favor with his lover’s physically afflicted family is to suffer a bizarre amputation. The protagonist in “Travels with the Snow Queen” reconsiders her fairy-tale romance when she deconstructs the clichés of traditional fairy tales and realizes that their heroines inevitably sacrifice and suffer much more than their heroes do. Link favors impersonal and potentially off-putting postmodern narrative approaches, but draws the readers to the emotional core of her stories through vulnerable but brave characters who cope gamely with all the strangeness the world can throw their way, In the books’s most effective tale, “Vanishing Act,” a young girl’s efforts to magically reunite herself with her distant family by withdrawing from the world around her poignantly calls attention to the spiritual vacancies and absence of affection in the family she stays with. “The Specialist’s Hat” features twin sisters whose morbid obsessions seems due as much to their father’s parental neglect as their mother’s death. Although a few of the selections seem little more than awkward exercises on the absurd, the best shed a warm, weird light on their worlds, illuminating fresh perspectives and fantastic possibilities.

Kirkus Reviews
Eleven stories showcase a dexterous use of language and a startling, if frequently elusive, imagination as ghosts, aliens, and the living dead invade the most mundane aspects of everyday life. Newcomer Link references fairy tales, mythology, and bits of our common contemporary cultural experience, not to offer commentary but to take off on her own original riffs. So in “Shoe and Marriage” we meet a dictator’s widow, unavoidably reminiscent of Imelda Marcos, living in a museum that displays the shoes she took from her husband’s murder victims. The story, which also describes a bizarre beauty pageant, plays verbally with shoe metaphors from Cinderella’s slippers to Dorothy’s ruby reds, but what touches you is not the author’s verbal acrobatics but the widow’s deep sense of sorrow and horror. Like many of the pieces here, “Shoe and Marriage” joins disparate parts that don’t always fit together, but linear connections are not the aim. When she depends too much on pure cleverness, Link ends up sounding derivative and brittle. “Survivor’s Ball, or The Donner Party,” in which two travelers come to an inn where a creepy if lavish shindig is in full swing, reminds you too insistently of Poe. “Flying Lessons,” about a girl’s love for a boy whose desire to fly ends tragically (hint, hint), and “Travels With the Snow Queen,” in which the fairy tale is revamped to read cute, come across as writing-school literary. But at her best, Link produces oddly moving imagery. In “Louise’s Ghost,” two friends named Louise have overlapping affairs. The shared name at first seems like another joke, but the tale gradually digs deep into the emotionally charged waters of loss and redemption. Stylistic pyrotechnics light up a bizarre but emotionally truthful landscape. Link’s a writer to watch.

Staff recommendation by someone nice at Cody’s.


Kelly Link’s collection of stories, Stranger Things Happen, really scores.

– Daniel Mendelsohn, New York Magazine

Stranger Things Happen is a tremendously appealing book, and lovers of short fiction should fall over themselves getting out the door to find a copy.”

Washington Post Book World

“quirky and exuberantly imagined….the best shed a warm, weird light on their worlds,
illuminating fresh perspectives and fantastic possibilities.”

Publisher’s Weekly

“Stylistic pyrotechnics light up a bizarre but emotionally truthful landscape. Link’s a writer to watch.”

Kirkus Reviews

“It is the tradition of the dust-jacket “blurb” to exaggerate the excellences of a book in hopes of enticing readers between its covers. But I do not follow that custom when I say that Stranger Things Happen is one of the very best books I have ever read. These stories will amaze, provoke, and intrigue. Best of all, they will delight. Kelly Link is terrific!“This is not blurbese. It is the living truth.”

– Fred Chappell, author of Family Gathering

“Finally, Kelly Link’s wonderful stories have been collected. My only complaint is the brevity of her oeuvre to date; as an avid reader of her work , I want her to continue to create more gems for me to read. I predict that “The Specialist’s Hat,” winner of the World Fantasy Award, will become part of the canon of classic supernatural tales.”

– Ellen Datlow, fiction editor, Scifiction.com

“I’ve been impatiently awaiting a collection of Kelly Link’s stories. Now that it’s here, it will sit in my library on that very short shelf of books I read again and again. For those who think Fantasy tired, Stranger Things Happen is a wake-up call.”

– Jeffrey Ford, author of The Beyond

“A set of stories that are by turns dazzling, funny, scary, and sexy, but only when they’re not all of these at once. Kelly Link has strangeness, charm and spin to spare. Writers better than this don’t happen.”

– Karen Joy Fowler, author of Sister Noon

“Kelly Link is probably the best short story writer currently out there, in any genre or none. She puts one word after another and makes real magic with them-funny, moving, tender, brave and dangerous. She is unique, and should be declared a national treasure, and possibly surrounded at all times by a cordon of armed marines.”

– Neil Gaiman, author of American Gods

“Link’s writing is gorgeous, mischievous, sexy and unsettling. Unexpected images burst on your brain like soap bubbles on a dog’s tongue. I’ve been trying to imitate her since I first read one of her stories. It’s impossible. Instead I find myself curling up with a satisfied sigh and enjoying once more.”

– Nalo Hopkinson, author of Midnight Robber

“Kelly Link is the exact best and strangest and funniest short story writer on earth that you have never heard of at the exact moment you are reading these words and making them slightly inexact. Now pay for the book.”

– Jonathan Lethem, author of Motherless Brooklyn

“Kelly Link is a brilliant writer. Her stories seem to come right out of your own dreams, the nice ones and the nightmares both. These stories will burrow right into your subconscious and stay with you forever.”

– Tim Powers, author of Declare

“Of all the books you’ll read this year, this is the one you’ll remember. Kelly Link’s stories are like gorgeous tattoos; they get under your skin and stay forever and change your life. Buy this book, read it, read it again, congratulate yourself, and then start buying Stranger Things Happen for your friends.”

– Sarah Smith, author of A Citizen of the Country

“Kelly Link makes spells, not stories. She is the carrier of an eerie, tender sorcery; each enchantment takes you like a curse, leaving you dizzy, wounded, and elated at once. Her vision is always compassionate, and frequently very funny–but don’t let that fool you. This book, like all real magic, is terribly dangerous. You open it at your peril.”

– Sean Stewart, author of Galveston

“If Kelly Link is not the “future of horror,” a ridiculous phrase, she ought to be. To have a future at all, horror in general, by which I might as well mean fiction in general, requires precisely her freshness, courage, intelligence, and resistance to received forms and values. Kelly Link seems always to speak from a deep, deeply personal, and unexpected standpoint. Story by story, she is creating new worlds, new frameworks for perception, right in front of our eyes. I think she is the most impressive writer of her generation.”

– Peter Straub, author of Magic Terror



Magic for Beginners – Reviews

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magic for beginnersmagic for beginners: stories
kelly link

Best of the Year Lists:

  • Link’s stories … play in a place few writers go, a netherworld between literature and fantasy, Alice Munro and J.K. Rowling, and Link finds truths there that most authors wouldn’t dare touch.”
    – Time Magazine
  • “Link’s writing shimmers with imagination.”
    Salon
  • “A mind-bending blast, as funny, disturbing and poignant as anything I’ve read this year.”
    – Capitol Times
  • “The storyteller’s mantra — “It gets better” — come to life and multiplied.”
    – Village Voice
  • “Link’s powerful prose places this collection into a class of its own.”
    – Boldtype (2005 Notable Books)
  • San Francisco Chronicle.

Story Prize recommended reading list.

Reviews | UK reviews

“One of current fiction’s little-known treasures.”
– Time Magazine

“Dazzling…. One to savor.”
– Entertainment Weekly (A, Editor’s Choice)

– Washington Post Book World

“For Kelly Link, life is suddenly magic.”
– Detroit Free Press (Hillil Italie, AP)

Magic for Beginners (Harvest, $14), is worth picking up. Doing so will put you in the hands of a true conjurer.”
– Vikas Turakhia, Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Kelly Link is the future of American short fiction.”
– Alexis Smith, Powells.com Staff Pick

“Fierce and witty.”
– Cleveland Plain Dealer

“These stories shimmer like impressionist paintings.”
– Montreal Gazette

“Kelly Link is the best short-fiction writer working in science fiction and fantasy today, and her new collection, Magic for Beginners, proves it.”
– Cory Doctorow, BoingBoing.net

“Link’s stories are delightfully playful, almost precocious, as she creates palimpsests of secret passages, hidden doors, quiet pulses of deeper meaning…. Link is fast becoming a major talent.”
– Boston Globe

“Fresh and unaffected, yet honed to the essential.”
– Salon

“Advanced alchemy.”
The Believer

“Sinister and sublime.”
– Boston Phoenix

“Exuberantly eccentric.”
– Time Out New York

“Link’s powerful prose places this collection into a class of its own.”
– Boldtype

“Spellbinding.”
– Time Out Chicago

“Kelly Link writes from way out in left field.”
– Charlotte Observer

“A complete delight.”
– Rich Horton, Locus

“These tales are every bit as remarkable as those in her first collection.”
– Gary K. Wolfe, Locus

* “Not only does Link find fresh perspectives from which to explore familiar premises, she also forges ingenious connections between disparate images and narrative approaches to suggest a convincing alternate logic that shapes the worlds of her highly original fantasies.”
– Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

“Cult-favorite fabulist and Shirley Jackson-esque master of the short story, returns with an eagerly-awaited new collection of thoughtfully strange tales that sprinkle the mundane with pixie dust, a dash of old-fashioned tragedy and a bit of gallows humor.”
– The Ruminator Review

“Truly magical, with masterfully crafted stories that are as dark as they are delightful….Sometimes hilarious, sometimes disconcerting, Link’s stories demonstrate her wicked sense of humor and genius wit.”
– Bookpage

“KELLY LINK has an uncanny knack for casting spells over her readers, for luring them into the dark places — the attic, the underworld, a realm beneath a hill. Her first collection of short stories, Stranger Things Happen, was published by Small Beer Press, a tiny independent publisher in Northampton founded by Link and Gavin J. Grant that, according to its Web site, is “committed to publishing short story collections and novels by authors we feel are slipping through the cracks.” These stories bend and transcend genre as Link stirs together myth, mystery, horror, and fantasy. Her second collection, Magic for Beginners (Small Beer Press, 272 pages, $24), is due out in July and promises the same mix of the sinister and the surreal. But the stories — more suggestive than they are descriptive — shouldn’t be pigeonholed as only for sci-fi and fantasy fans. Because for all Link’s use of fairy tale and phantasm, she roots her stories in the life that we know. The narrator in “The Faery Handbag,” for example, tells the story of her grandmother’s magic bag — a bag so black it feels like “when you stretch out your hand at night, to turn on a light, but all you feel is darkness” — which if opened correctly leads to a secret realm, and if opened incorrectly leads to a howling, hairless Cerberus-like dog. The story begins in the Garment District, in Kendall Square; there’s a sly reference to the Star Wars prequels; and, beyond the handbag, it’s a story of young lost love. Fairy tales and myths may be timeless, but these stories are of this moment.”
–Nina MacLaughlin, Boston Phoenix

“Link is the purest, most distinctive surrealist in America.”
– Booklist

“These nine stories are the kinds of stories for which literary phrases like “surrealism” and “magical realism” were invented, and I guess they’ll do, although they seem pretty stale and pale in the face of Link’s boundlessly creative prose. Let’s just say that nobody mixes the fantastical and the ordinary together quite like Link does, spinning tales that are both funny and disturbing, straightforward and elliptical, unreal and real.”
– The Capital Times

“One of the most fascinating writers practicing the craft today.”
– The Simon

“Wishful thinking on the brink of disaster.”
– Village Voice

“Magical realism meets horror meets postmodern absurdism. Very fresh and funny.”
– Michael Knight, Knoxville Metro Pulse Summer Reading Guide

“A bizarre and enchanting read, worth reading and re-reading.”
– Daily Nebraskan

“A wonderful rattlebag of fantastic tales from far beyond the concrete sidewalks and convenience stores we know. Like her first collection, Magic for Beginners uses humor as the main prism through which the author views her mostly hapless or at least happy-go-lucky characters. The strange attraction of Link’s fiction is that even when you’re not really sure what’s going on you’re having way too much fun reading to stop and rereading these tall tales is a positive pleasure.”
– Rich Rennicks Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, Asheville, NC

The stories in Magic for Beginners make their own strange, perfectly formed sense. Link creates these familiar, spooky, sometimes funny worlds with cats parented by witches, or a cheerleader hanging out with the devil, or creepifying rabbits. I’m always a little tense reading these stories. In the very best way, I never know what is coming next. If she only parcelled out one elegant sentence at a time I would beg for each one.”
– Pam Harcourt, Women & Children First, Chicago, IL

“I am in love with Kelly Link’s new collection of stories, Magic For Beginners, just out in hardcover. This book is a fairly complete list of my favorite things. She sort of summarized it best when she signed it for me: “Love, Magic, Zombies!” It’s fantastical, whimsical, and dead serious and it makes me interested in short stories again.”
– Alexander Chee, author Edinburgh, in Books To Watch Out For

Tiger Heron

UK reviews

“This is one of the most extraordinary and wonderful books of the year.”
Time Out London, Mar. 27, 07

“Possibly grimmer than Grimm.”
The Herald, Feb 2, 07

“Beautifully written short stories; eccentric and dark, the collection is an Alice in Wonderland for grown-ups.”
Dazed and Confused

“Link’s writing is bold, tender, mischievous and unsettling.”
Cork Evening Echo, Feb 17, 07

“These are weird and wacky tales, each with their own barmy internal logic which draws you in, flips you on your head and leaves you dizzy with disbelief…. Link’s extraordinary use of language is as haunting as the tales themselves. She blends fantasy and reality into an irresistible melange that, at its best, becomes a powerful metaphor for the unreliability of perception.”
—Jane Wessel, Venue (****)

“Link’s magic is to show the extraordinary in the ordinary and vice versa: no mean feat.”
RTE Guide (*****)

“Just when you think you’ve read all the best magic and fantasy stories, along comes Link and the dull world is enchanted all over again. Her imagination floats free into her very own twilight zone.”
Saga, Mar 07

“Whether she’s writing about a suburban family haunted by rabbits or a grandmother who keeps a world hidden in her handbag, Link’s stories are witty, moving and sometimes scary.”
The Gloss Magazine, Feb 07

“A collection of nine stories from a talent to watch, this is a lyrical fantasy where the ordinary is made extraordinary.”
The Bookseller, Oct 06

Advance Praise

“Kelly Link owns the most darkly playful voice in American fiction since Donald Barthelme. She is pushing the American short story into places that it hasn’t yet been pushed, while somehow managing to maintain a powerful connection to traditional forms and storytelling values.”
– Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

“The dream-logic of Magic for Beginners is intoxicating. These stories will come alive, put on zoot suits, and wrestle you to the ground. They want you and you will be theirs.”
– Alice Sebold, The Lovely Bones

“A wonderful rattlebag of fantastic tales from far beyond the concrete sidewalks and convenience stores we know. Like her first collection, Magic for Beginners uses humor as the main prism through which the author views her mostly hapless or at least happy-go-lucky characters. The strange attraction of Link’s fiction is that even when you’re not really sure what’s going on you’re having way too much fun reading to stop and rereading these tall tales is a positive pleasure.”
– Rich Rennicks Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, Asheville, NC

“The stories in Magic for Beginners make their own strange, perfectly formed sense. Link creates these familiar, spooky, sometimes funny worlds with cats parented by witches, or a cheerleader hanging out with the devil, or creepifying rabbits. I’m always a little tense reading these stories. In the very best way, I never know what is coming next. If she only parcelled out one elegant sentence at a time I would beg for each one.”
– Pam Harcourt, Women & Children First, Chicago, IL



Trampoline – Index

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Trampoline: an anthology
Edited by Kelly Link

A partial index for this volume

O

Orange
“Sunrise colors faces of buildings”
“Far ahead, desert sunset spreads”
“sectional couch in Pearl Street”
“Her breakfast’s in a napkin”
rolls unheeded from her lap”
“Will there be”
“See, that by thy pillow.”
“lying by a tarry hand”
“she held a scrawny”
“but dwindled out an”
“oil of”
“Coors Lite cans and”
“keep him in warm beer and fresh”
“frozen exhaust on”
“circle further up”
“County 14″
“Grove Mall”
“and the last of”
“in the fading light”
“and licking the”
“with long, tongues”
“lit with citronella”
“Your hair’s”
“and silver like the seething”
“a glass of”
“sliver in the sky”
“Nut meats and”
“in a bowl”
“sweet”
“glowing bright”

O

Tomato
and tiny fried eggplants stuffed with”
“cans of…and kidney beans”

O



Kelly Link

by Kelly Link

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Pretty Monsters

October 2, 2008 from Viking Penguin:

PRETTY MONSTERS

Kelly Link
HC: October 2, 2008 · 978-0670010905 · $19.99

Nine stories each with an illustration by Shaun Tan.

“The Wizards of Perfil,” “Monster,” “The Surfer,” The Constable of Abal,” “The Wrong Grave,” “The Faery Handbag,” “The Specialist’s Hat,” “Magic for Beginners,” and “Pretty Monsters.”

Order a signed copy and receive tattoos, stickers, and similar items of interest.

** News:

** Interviews:

magic for beginnersMFB pbMagic for Beginners

  • Illustrated by Shelley Jackson.
  • Hardcover | paperback | Limited
  • Best of the Year: Time Magazine, Salon, Village Voice, San Francisco Chronicle, PopMatters.
  • Reviews
  • Free Download
  • “Eerie and engrossing.”
    Washington Post Book World
  • * Not only does Link find fresh perspectives from which to explore familiar premises, she also forges ingenious connections between disparate images and narrative approaches to suggest a convincing alternate logic that shapes the worlds of her highly original fantasies.”
    Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

Stranger Things HappenStranger Things Happen

  • Debut collection by Kelly Link. A Salon Book of the Year and Village Voice Favorite Book.
  • Reviews
  • Free Download
  • Now in its sixth printing.
  • Fifth Printing Note: We are sorry to say some copies of this printing have page 118 reprinted where page 188 should be. There are a couple of remedies. You can download the pdf of page 188here or you can email us.
    We are a tiny press and we apologize for our mistake. We hope the replacement page (or the book) will satisfy readers. However, if you’d rather, we will replace your book. Please email us if this is the case.
    How to identify if your copy is a 5th printing: On the copyright page it states “First Edition 5 6 7 8 9 0″
    Thank you.

Trampoline -- click for larger imageTrampoline: an anthology of mostly original fiction edited by Kelly Link.

  • Greer Gilman’s novella “A Crowd of Bone” was a World Fantasy Award Winner. Alex Irvine’s story “Gus Dreams of Biting the Mailman” and the anthology were also nominated.


Read Some Stories by Kelly Link

by Kelly Link

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then go see her: Readings and Signings

 

How wonderful online publication is! Much later, there they still are, awaiting a look from the curious.
   
Title: Where you’re going:
Light Tin House
The Wrong Grave (excerpt) Candlewick Books
Origin Story A Public Space
The Faery Handbag  

Most of My Friends are Two-Thirds Water

Fantastic Metropolis
The Specialist’s Hat Event Horizon
The Girl Detective Event Horizon
Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose Fence
Survivor’s Ball, or, The Donner Party Dark Planet
Stranger Things Happen collection
   
Audio:  
The Hortlak KQED – The Writers’ Block(11/06)
The Girl Detective Read by Alex Wilson. (8/06)
The Specialist’s Hat (40 minute MP3). Read by Jason Lundberg. (1/06)
Monster (Real Audio file) WSUI — Prairie Lights (11/05)
Most of My Friends are Two-Thirds Water Read by Alex Wilson. (7/05)
Catskin WNYC — Spinning (11/02)
   
Interview Bat Segundo Show (12/06)

Sorry, Event Horizon is down. Read these stories in Stranger Things Happen.

The Girl Detective

The Specialist's Hat

T-shirts, Mugs, Mice with pads.



Trampoline – Bios

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Trampoline: an anthology

Contributors

Christopher Rowe, Ed Park, Shelley Jackson, John Gonzalez, Samantha Hunt, Alex Irvine, Greer Gilman, Alan DeNiro, Maureen McHugh, Dave Shaw, Susan Mosser, Vandana Singh, Glen Hirshberg, Jeffrey Ford, Beth Adele Long, Carol Emshwiller, Christopher Barzak, Rosalind Palermo Stevenson, Richard Butner, Karen Joy Fowler

O

Christopher RoweChristopher Rowe, The Force Acting on the Displaced Body
interview
chapbook

Christopher Rowe lives in Kentucky. His fiction, poetry and essays have appeared in many magazines, webzines and zine zines. He runs a small press, the Fortress of Words, and edits a zine, Say… He likes outside better than inside, brick better than vinyl and made better than bought.

You can buy Say… if you poke around on this site a little bit more. You can read some of his stories online at The Dead Mule, Ideomancer, and maybe even Small Beer.

Bittersweet Creek, a chapbook
– “Sally Harpe

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Ed Park, Well-Moistened with Cheap Wine, the Sailor and the Wayfarer Sing of Their Absent Sweethearts

Ed Park is the author of a few published stories that have changed the way we see the world, two unpublished novels that haven’t, an unpublished memoir in which every paragraph begins with “In,” and two books illustrated by the fabulous Michael K. Carter. He is a senior editor at The Village Voice, where he reviews films, books, theater, and music. With Heidi Julavits, he co-edits The Believer. He contributes to the Canadian magazine Cinema Scope and belongs to the Harry Stephen Keeler Society, the New York Society Library, and the Duane Reade Dollar Rewards Club.

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Shelley Jackson, Angel

Shelley Jackson is the author of The Melancholy of Anatomy, the hypertext novel Patchwork Girl, and several children’s books. She lives in Brooklyn.

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John Gonzalez, Impala
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John Gonzalez grew up in Battle Creek, Michigan, the Cereal Capital of the World. He spent much of his early life trying to escape, but the attack dogs seemed to anticipate his every move. After several years in graduate school and employment as a social worker, John landed a job as the house writer for Outrage Games, a videogame developer in Ann Arbor whose next game, the fantasy-SF action-adventure Alter Echo, is due out in August 2003. In 2001 he attended the Clarion Writers Workshop. “Impala” is his first publication.

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Samantha HuntSamantha Hunt, Famous Men (Three Stories)

Samantha Hunt is a writer and artist from New York. Much to her delight, her stories and poems have appeared in McSweeney’s, Jubilat, Swerve, The Iowa Review, Literary, Colorado and Western Humanities Reviews. Her first play, The Difference Engine, a story about the life of Charles Babbage, is currently in production. Hunt’s artwork can be found at the New York Public Library. Of late, she is completing a novel.

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Alex IrvineAlex Irvine, Gus Dreams of Biting the Mail Man

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Alex Irvine‘s first novel A Scattering of Jades appeared in 2002 from Tor Books. His second, One King, One Soldier, is scheduled for July 2004. In between, a short-story collection, Unintended Consequences,will appear from Subterranean Press. He has published short fiction inF&SF, Asimov’s, Sci Fiction, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, and anthologies including Starlight 3, Polyphony 2, and Live Without a Net.He teaches English at Gardiner Area High School in Gardiner, Maine — the home of Edwin Arlington Robinson — and lives in Portland, Maine, with his wife, Beth, and twins, Emma and Ian.

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Greer Gilman, A Crowd of Bone
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Greer Gilman’s novel, Moonwise, is decidedly thorny. It won the Crawford Award and was shortlisted for the Tiptree and Mythopoeic Fantasy Awards. “A Crowd of Bone” is one of three linked stories, variations on a winter myth. The first, “Jack Daw’s Pack,” was a Nebula finalist for 2001, and the subject of a Foundationinterview by Michael Swanwick. A sometime forensic librarian, Gilman lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and travels in stone circles.

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Alan DeNiro, RatbastardAlan DeNiro, Fuming Woman
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Alan DeNiro is a graduate of the MFA program in creative writing at the University of Virginia, and he also attended Clarion in 1998. His fiction has appeared in many literary and genre venues, including Santa Monica Review, 3rd Bed, Strange Horizons, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, Fence, Talebones, and his work has been shortlisted for the O. Henry award. Along with Chris Barzak, Kristin Livdahl, and Barth Anderson, he is a member of the writerly and publishing co-op known as the Ratbastards. He has recently completed a novel, The Memory Palace of Ray Fell, which involves the perils of dating imaginary people. He regularly reviews fiction for Rain Taxi, and is a correspondent for the weblog Ptarmigan. He is also the author of two poetry chapbooks: The Black Hare and Atari Ecologues. Finally, he is a failed trapeze artist…no, just kidding.

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Mauureen McHughMaureen McHugh, Eight-Legged Story
Mothers and Other Monsters

Maureen McHugh (1959) has spent most of her life in Ohio, but has lived in New York City and, for a year, in Shijiazhuang, China. Her first novel, China Mountain Zhang, won the Tiptree Award. Her latest novel is Nekropolis, which was a BookSense 76 pick and a New York TimesEditor’s Choice. Right now she lives with her husband, son and two dogs next to a dairy farm. Sometimes, in the summer, black and white Holsteins look over the fence at them.

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Dave ShawDave Shaw, King of Spain
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Dave Shaw lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, with his wife Natalie, three-year-old daughter Mia, and newest child, Henry (born May 17, 2003). Father was awarded the Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Here Comes the Roar, which will be published by University of North Texas Press in 2003. His stories have appeared in magazines and anthologies in England, Japan, New Zealand, and the U.S., including Best American Mystery Stories, The Southern Anthology, Literal Latte, Stand Magazine, and publications you’ve never heard of. He has received The Literal Latte Fiction Award, The Southern Prize for Fiction, a North Carolina Arts Council Writer’s Fellowship, and other awards for his work, and he completed his MFA in Fiction Writing at UNC-Greensboro. With that out of the way, he’d like now to point out that in 2000, 2001, and 2002, his team won Carrboro, North Carolina’s Co-Rec Softball Championship.

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Susan Mosser, Bump Ship

Susan Mosser has been writing for a while now and finds it to be just the very best part of sentience. By grace of unemployment, in the steamy wastelands of central Florida, she is writing two books (one novel and one mostly not) and ghost-editing a third, and lately has taken to scribbling bits of subtly rhythmic verse on gasoline receipts while driving. Susan is a graduate of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop.

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Vandana SinghVandana Singh, The Woman Who Thought She Was a Planet
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Vandana Singh was born and raised in India and now lives in the United States with her husband, daughter, dog and innumerable books. She draws upon her background in physics and her experience as a woman and an Indian to spin wild tales of science fiction and fantasy. Her first published story appeared in the original anthology Polyphony, Volume 1.

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Glen Hirshberg, Shipwreck Beach

Glen Hirshberg‘s first novel, The Snowman’s Children, was published by Carroll & Graf in December, 2002. Kelly said she liked it. His ghost stories have appeared in numerous anthologies, including The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror, and Dark Terrors 6, and have been nominated for the International Horror Guild Award and twice for the World Fantasy Award. Carroll & Graf will publish The Two Sams, a collection of his supernatural fiction, later this year. When he sent this bio, Glen lived in Los Angeles with his wife, son, and daughter, but he probably doesn’t anymore.

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Jeffrey Ford, The Yellow Chamber
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Jeffrey Ford is the author of a trilogy of novels from Eos Harper Collins — The Physiognomy (winner of the 1998 World Fantasy Award and a New York TimesNotable Book of the year for ’97), Memoranda (a New York Times Notable book for ’99), The Beyond ( a selection for Washington Post Book World’s Best of 2001 list). His most recent novel, The Portrait of Mrs. Charbuque (Morrow/Harper Collins), was published in June 2002 as was his first story collection, The Fantasy Writer’s Assistant & Other Stories (Golden Gryphon Press). His short fiction has appeared in the magazines — Fantasy & Science Fiction, Sci Fiction, Event Horizon, Black Gate, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, MSS, The Northwest Review, Puerto Del Sol – and in the anthologies — Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror, Vols. 13 and 15, The Green Man: Tales From the Mythic Forest, Leviathan #3, and The Journal of Pulse Pounding Narratives. “The Fantasy Writer’s Assistant,” (short story) was nominated for a Nebula Award in 2001, and “Creation” (short story) was nominated for a Nebula in 2002. Ford lives in South Jersey with his wife, Lynn, and two sons, Jack and Derek. He teaches Writing and Literature at Brookdale Community College in Monmouth County, New Jersey.

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Beth Adele Long, Destroyer
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Beth Adele Long‘s short fiction has appeared in Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet and Electric Velocipede. She is a graduate of the Clarion Writer’s workshop and a former writer-in-residence at the Kerouac House in Orlando. By day she works as a graphic arts jack-of-all-trades for a fantabulous little company in Cape Canaveral. She lives in Florida and still complains about the cold winters, much to her northern friends’ disgust.

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Carol Emshwiller, Gods and Three Wishes
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“I was a dreadful student. Just squeaked by with Cs and a few Ds. Failed freshman English and had to repeat it. Almost failed again.”

I went all the way through music school, playing the violin, but I had slow fingers so failed at that.”

I went to war. ALL! the men were gone so, though I was a pacifist, I went with them. After war, I went to art school. First thing I didn’t fail at.”

I always hated writing. It’s too hard. But, like finally learning to love lobster, now Lobster is my favorite. I’ve failed at even that though. I’ve become allergic to it. Now I love writing. I love that it is so hard–that you never stop learning how to do it.”

I’ve just had two new books with Small Beer Press. These are my seventh and eighth books.”

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Christopher BarzakChristopher Barzak, Dead Boy Found
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Christopher Barzak has published stories in a variety of literary and speculative fiction magazines, including Nerve, Realms of Fantasy,Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, Strange Horizons, The Vestal Review, and The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror. He has recently completed his Master’s Degree in English at Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio. He grew up in rural Ohio, now lives in post-industrial Ohio, has lived in California and Michigan, now lives in an attic back in post-industrial Ohio, has no pets to speak of, no longer smokes except socially, and likes to dance. He is 27.

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Rosalind Palermo StevensonRosalind Palermo Stevenson, Insect Dreams
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Rosalind Palermo Stevenson’s fiction and prose poems have appeared in Conjunctions (Web Conjunctions); Washington Square; Skidrow Penthouse; Phantasmagoria; Literal Latte; Reflections (published by the United Nations Society of Writers); No Roses Review; and White Crow, among other literary journals. Her prose poems “The Maria Axiom” and “Soul Murder” have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Her short story, “The Guest,” won the Anne and Henry Paolucci fiction contest for Italian-American writing, and the Negative Capability annual fiction contest. Rosalind lives in New York City where she is currently completing a second collection of short fiction.

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Mr. Richard Butner

Richard Butner, Ash City Stomp
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Richard Butner is a freelance journalist and short story writer. Hell, he might even write a novel soon. He lives in Raleigh, North Carolina. He loves you.

Richard Butner is a freelance journalist and short story writer. He runs the Sycamore Hill Writers’ Conference with John Kessel. For some reason he holds an M.S. in Computer Engineering (with an English minor) and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering, both from North Carolina State University.

His stories have appeared in magazines such as Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet,(read “Other Agents” here), Scream, and RE Arts & Letters, as well as in anthologies such as Intersections: The Sycamore Hill Anthology, which he co-edited with John Kessel and Mark L. Van Name. He lives in Raleigh, North Carolina.

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Karen Joy FowlerKaren Joy Fowler, King Rat

Karen Joy Fowler is the author of two story collections and three novels and is a frequent teacher of writing workshops. She lives with her husband in Davis, California. She wishes someday to have published more books than you can count on the fingers of both hands. She wishes this more often than she manages to actually make herself work on book number six. She’s starting to think the opposable thumb is not all it’s cracked up to be.

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Kelly Link

Kelly Link co-edits the zine, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. Her first collection,Stranger Things Happen, was nominated for the Firecracker Award and was selected as a best book of the year by Salon, Locus, and The Village Voice. She is working on more short stories.

Trampoline, An Anthology

Trampoline: an anthology, edited by Kelly Link



Stranger Things Happen reviews

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“Kelly Link’s collection of stories, Stranger Things Happen, really scores.”
– Daniel Mendelsohn, New York Magazine

Stranger Things Happen is a tremendously appealing book, and lovers of short fiction should fall over themselves getting out the door to find a copy.”
Washington Post Book World, Aug. 26, 2001

“Quirky and exuberantly imagined….the best shed a warm, weird light on their worlds, illuminating fresh perspectives and fantastic possibilities.”
Publisher’s Weekly, June 25, 2001

“Stylistic pyrotechnics light up a bizarre but emotionally truthful landscape. Link’s a writer to watch.”
Kirkus Reviews, June 2001

“It is the tradition of the dust-jacket “blurb” to exaggerate the excellences of a book in hopes of enticing readers between its covers. But I do not follow that custom when I say that Stranger Things Happen is one of the very best books I have ever read. These stories will amaze, provoke, and intrigue. Best of all, they will delight. Kelly Link is terrific! This is not blurbese. It is the living truth.”
– Fred Chappell, author of Family Gathering

“Finally, Kelly Link’s wonderful stories have been collected. My only complaint is the brevity of her oeuvre to date; as an avid reader of her work , I want her to continue to create more gems for me to read. I predict that “The Specialist’s Hat,” winner of the World Fantasy Award, will become part of the canon of classic supernatural tales.”
– Ellen Datlow

“I’ve been impatiently awaiting a collection of Kelly Link’s stories. Now that it’s here, it will sit in my library on that very short shelf of books I read again and again. For those who think Fantasy tired, Stranger Things Happen is a wake-up call.”
– Jeffrey Ford

“A set of stories that are by turns dazzling, funny, scary, and sexy, but only when they’re not all of these at once. Kelly Link has strangeness, charm and spin to spare. Writers better than this don’t happen.”
– Karen Joy Fowler, author of The Jane Austen Book Club

“Kelly Link is probably the best short story writer currently out there, in any genre or none. She puts one word after another and makes real magic with them-funny, moving, tender, brave and dangerous. She is unique, and should be declared a national treasure, and possibly surrounded at all times by a cordon of armed marines.”
– Neil Gaiman, author of American Gods

“Link’s writing is gorgeous, mischievous, sexy and unsettling. Unexpected images burst on your brain like soap bubbles on a dog’s tongue. I’ve been trying to imitate her since I first read one of her stories. It’s impossible. Instead I find myself curling up with a satisfied sigh and enjoying once more.”
– Nalo Hopkinson, author of Midnight Robber

“Kelly Link is the exact best and strangest and funniest short story writer on earth that you have never heard of at the exact moment you are reading these words and making them slightly inexact. Now pay for the book.”
– Jonathan Lethem, author of Motherless Brooklyn

“Kelly Link is a brilliant writer. Her stories seem to come right out of your own dreams, the nice ones and the nightmares both. These stories will burrow right into your subconscious and stay with you forever.”
– Tim Powers, author of On Stranger Tides

“Of all the books you’ll read this year, this is the one you’ll remember. Kelly Link’s stories are like gorgeous tattoos; they get under your skin and stay forever and change your life.  Buy this book, read it, read it again, congratulate yourself, and then start buying Stranger Things Happen for your friends.”
– Sarah Smith, author of A Citizen of the Country

“Kelly Link makes spells, not stories. She is the carrier of an eerie, tender sorcery; each enchantment takes you like a curse, leaving you dizzy, wounded, and elated at once. Her vision is always compassionate, and frequently very funny–but don’t let that fool you. This book, like all real magic, is terribly dangerous. You open it at your peril.”
– Sean Stewart, author of Galveston

“If Kelly Link is not the “future of horror,” a ridiculous phrase, she ought to be. To have a future at all, horror in general, by which I might as well mean fiction in general, requires precisely her freshness, courage, intelligence, and resistance to received forms and values. Kelly Link seems always to speak from a deep, deeply personal, and unexpected standpoint. Story by story, she is creating new worlds, new frameworks for perception, right in front of our eyes. I think she is the most impressive writer of her generation.”
– Peter Straub, author of Magic Terror