Endless Things

John Crowley  - published May 2007

Endless Things is the fourth novel—and much-anticipated conclusion—of John Crowley’s astonishing and lauded Aegypt sequence: a dense, lyrical meditation on history, alchemy, and memory. Spanning three centuries, and weaving together the stories of Renaissance magician John Dee, philosopher Giordano Bruno, and present-day itinerant historian and writer Pierce Moffett, the Aegypt sequence is as richly significant as Lawrence Durrell’s Alexandria Quartet or Anthony Powell’s Dance to the Music of Time. Crowley, a master prose stylist, explores transformations physical, magical, alchemical, and personal in this epic, distinctly American novel where the past, present, and future reflect each other.

Aegypt is The Solitudes (previously titled Aegypt), Love & Sleep, Daemonomania, and Endless Things.

Best of the Year lists:

“It is a work of great erudition and deep humanity that is as beautifully composed as any novel in my experience.”
Washington Post Book World

“An unpredictable, free-flowing, sui generis novel.”
LA Times Favorite SciFi Books of 2007

Locus Award finalist

Reviews of Endless Things:

“With Endless Things and the completion of the Ægypt cycle, Crowley has constructed one of the finest, most welcoming tales contemporary fiction has to offer us.”
Book Forum

“Crowley’s peculiar kind of fantasy: a conscious substitute for the magic in which you don’t quite believe any more.”
London Review of Books

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Review of the Aegypt sequence:

“With Little, Big, Crowley established himself as America’s greatest living writer of fantasy. Aegypt confirms that he is one of our finest living writers, period.”
– Michael Dirda in The American Scholar.

“This year, while millions of Harry Potter fans celebrated and mourned the end of their favorite series, a much smaller but no less devoted group of readers marked another literary milestone: the publication of the last book in John Crowley’s Aegypt Cycle.”
Matt Ruff

“A dizzying experience, achieved with unerring security of technique.”
The New York Times Book Review

“A master of language, plot, and characterization.”
—Harold Bloom

“The further in you go, the bigger it gets.”
—James Hynes

“The writing here is intricate and thoughtful, allusive and ironic. . . . Ægypt bears many resemblances, incidental and substantive, to Thomas Pynchon’s wonderful 1966 novel The Crying of Lot 49.
USA Today

“An original moralist of the same giddy heights occupied by Thomas Mann and Robertson Davies.”
San Francisco Chronicle

On the web:

Credits

  • Cover images © Rosamond Purcell from Bookworm by Rosamond Purcell, published by The Quantuck Lane Press.
    Download cover for print.

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