He’s killing them at home too

Sat 18 Aug 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Bush’s lethal legacy: more executions

The US already kills more of its prisoners than almost any other country. Now the White House plans to cut the right of appeal of death row inmates…

By Andrew Gumbel in Los Angeles
Published: 15 August 2007

The Bush administration is preparing to speed up the executions of criminals who are on death row across the United States, in effect, cutting out several layers of appeals in the federal courts so that prisoners can be “fast-tracked” to their deaths.



Wed 8 Aug 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

We are traveling soon thus service on this site and by paper mail will be slow, irresolute, perhaps a little inconvenient, out of time, and general discombobulated. How does this differ from usual? Not sure.



Wed 8 Aug 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 1 Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

We are traveling soon thus service on this site and by paper mail will be slow, irresolute, perhaps a little inconvenient, out of time, and general discombobulated. How does this differ from usual? Not sure.



Chinese publication

Mon 30 Jul 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

A couple of stories for Chinese readers:

Jedediah Berry’s “Thumb War” (originally in Pindeldyboz). Don’t think they quite got permission for that. Just the rewards of fame.

The Simplified Chinese translation Kelly Link’s “The Specialist’s Hat” on Celestial’s web site (originally on Ellen Datlow’s Event Horizon).

“When you’re Dead,” Samantha says, “you don’t have to brush your teeth.”
“When you’re Dead,” Claire says, “you live in a box, and it’s always dark, but you’re not ever afraid.”

“你成为“亡者”以后,” 萨曼莎说,“就没必要刷牙了。”
“你成为“亡者”以后,” 克莱尔说,“会呆在一个盒子里,那里永远都是黑的,但你再也不会害怕了。”



Strange Horizons

Thu 26 Jul 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

is asking for money to pay writers and giving away loot while doing so.

Yeah, you can do it. Yeah, that’s good.

But don’t request this:

 

Sarah Canary Tour T-Shirt

Originally designed in 1991 to celebrate Karen Joy Fowler’s book tour for Sarah Canary, this silkscreened t-shirt announces, rock-concert style, the Sarah Canary World Tour. (Donated by Ted Chiang.)

because we wants it.



Free?

Mon 2 Jul 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Lew Shiner, author of some great fun novels including Say Goodbye and Glimpses, is the latest author to post along with a ton of fiction online—the difference here is that Shiner has also posted a manifesto a. His new site, the Fiction Liberation Front (can we join?) has a stack of free reading — all under Creative Commons licenses.

I’ll also be adding new short fiction, music reviews, and articles from time to time, though I won’t guarantee that I won’t also publish short pieces elsewhere. I’m launching the site with three previously unpublished stories (“Straws,” “Fear Itself,” and “Golfing Vietnam”) plus a major story from 2004 (“Perfidia”) that’s had only limited circulation, and as a special bonus, my previously unpublished “vampire lawyer” screenplay, THE NEXT.

Strange Horizons is consistently one of the best short speculative fiction sites on the web. Every year (until this year) they used to tie a writer to the top of a pole and sell the right to shoot arrows at said writer. After seeing how scarily accurate the average spec fic fan was with a bow and arrow (we’re not even talking compound bows here), the SH crew have decided that a fund drive is more appropriate. The fund drive started July 2nd and they’re hoping to raise $6,000—all of which, since they’re still n all-volunteer operation—goes to the writers (and maybe the web host!). So: Donate what you can and you’ll be entered into a prize drawing.

The drawing includes a bunch of our book, so if you’ve been meaning to order them and like an element of chance in your book purchases, check out the whole prize list and do that thing.



Tithe?

Thu 28 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Has anyone seen our copy of Tithe? I could swear it was around here somewhere!

Also: we are such populists!

Online Dating

This rating was determined based on the presence of the following words:

  • death (2x)
  • dead (1x)


General update

Thu 21 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Added reviews to a bunch of pages. It’s too exciting.

You have until tomorrow to send in your haiku to win a copy of the new edition of The Solitudes (aka the book previously known as Aegypt) from the Overlook Press. This is one of the best uses of video seen on the net (well, except the blurry text — but we know all about digital cameras being used for video). Ok, maybe not, but it made us laugh.

Recognize this picture? (Here’s a hint.)

John Crowley writes about Rosamond Purcell’s awesome new book Bookworm in the Boston Review. (There’s an interesting part on the difficulty of writing about something that the artist writes so well about herself.)

We’re sending Storyteller back to press, yay! Here are some reviews just added to the site:

“Its strength, I think, lies in some of the pointers she offers to beginning writers as to help them shorten the time it takes to get published.”– New Pages

“If you are a budding writer, please spend $16 on this book before raising the money needed to attend Clarion. You’ll get much more out of the workshop if you do.”– Emerald City

“For such a short book — just barely 192 pages — there is a lot here, and a lot that I’ve never found in other writing books, and it’s all on-point. It’s also delivered as part of the story of one of the most significant institutions in the history of science fiction and fantasy, as told by a true storyteller.”– Green Man Review

Aren’t the Clarions on at the moment? Hope it’s going well and that all the writers are too busy reading journals to write. Or, the other way round.

Here’s the Live Book/Gayatri page for the Russian editions of Stranger Things Happen and Magic for Beginners.

Ed Park on Kim Stanley Robinson’s climate books.

A certain Japanese multi-level marketing scheme which Gavin was involved in in 1998 has been handed a partial business suspension order by the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry. Nova, one of the larger foreign Japanese language teaching companies, is good for teachers in that they organize the visa and a place to stay. No one ever called them over-friendly on the customer service side. Go students! (Thanks Naoko.)

131 – US States Renamed For Countries With Similar GDPs

Say good-bye to Shocklines.com and send Matt a note of thanks while you’re at it. It’s not a reflection on publishing (which we all know is boomin’!), but it is a reflection on how hard it is to organize and sell books, mags, zines, chapbooks, &c. from the small presses. Moment of thought over, bookmark Pulp Source (as well as the usual B&M’s: Atomic, Borderlands, Quimby’s, et al).



Hangfire Books

Mon 21 May 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Hang Fire BooksThis is my favorite new blog at the moment, and Will is, in the parlance of the last century, blogging up a storm on books, book finds, zombies, bookselling tools (ok, ok, we ordered a desktop tape dispenser—who knew it was so indispensable?), and, yes, more. RSS feeds available, you know what to do.

Also:

Jennifer Stevenson hops on the blogoplane.

Vice Magazine shouldn’t be good but after the Appalachian issue a while ago I’m converted. (Although they’re stopping with the theme issues, ah well.)
Latest ish has a tiny report from someone who went to check out Sudan. Sudan in a pop culture mag? (Or you can download the Iraq issue.) Ok, it’s not Playboy interviews or Rolling Stone looking at voting irregularities but there is something of unexpected weight in every ish.

William Gibson’s Spook Country — a caper novel! More on that later this summer. Summer? Eek!

We are planning for WisCon (here’s everyones’ schedule!) and Book Expo. We are planning on 2008. We are planning on dinner. Don’t suppose you’re cooking?



Mon 14 May 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Birnbaum on Generation Loss (where he notes our antecedents and gets a plug in for AVH Books). GL was also mentioned in Sarah Weinman’s Dark Passages column on the LA Times:

Cass is a marvel, someone with whom we take the difficult journey toward delayed adulthood, wishing her encouragement despite grave odds.

Very much enjoying the friction in the reviews that comes from the book being a page turner about a superficially unlikable character. Must gather the quotes on Cass at some point.

We have good news about an ’08* title which we will spill (the news, not the title) at some point soon. (In other words: we have a new book coming, yay! 1 of 3 we’re planning so far. Hello future.)

Mr. William Smith, writer of an occasional film column for our august journal, has a bookity bloggity thing here where much pro-zombie writing will no doubt be posted.

LCRW, that journal, that zine, is in progress: we have a cover and it can be ordered (although there is no page for the zine yet). The final contents will not be known until WisCon or so. We are far behind in our LCRW reading, sorry writers. 3 months reply? Nope. Not any more. Not for a while.

* Updated to say: stupid WordPress. Putting an apostrophe before 08 (as: ’08) gives the wrong apostrophe. A quick look at a fave reference (Thanks Webmonkey!) gives the correct character (’) for it. Pah. We defeats the internet.



Mon 14 May 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Birnbaum on Generation Loss (where he notes our antecedents and gets a plug in for AVH Books). GL was also mentioned in Sarah Weinman’s Dark Passages column on the LA Times:

Cass is a marvel, someone with whom we take the difficult journey toward delayed adulthood, wishing her encouragement despite grave odds.

Very much enjoying the friction in the reviews that comes from the book being a page turner about a superficially unlikable character. Must gather the quotes on Cass at some point.

We have good news about an ’08* title which we will spill (the news, not the title) at some point soon. (In other words: we have a new book coming, yay! 1 of 3 we’re planning so far. Hello future.)

Mr. William Smith, writer of an occasional film column for our august journal, has a bookity bloggity thing here where much pro-zombie writing will no doubt be posted.

LCRW, that journal, that zine, is in progress: we have a cover and it can be ordered (although there is no page for the zine yet). The final contents will not be known until WisCon or so. We are far behind in our LCRW reading, sorry writers. 3 months reply? Nope. Not any more. Not for a while.

* Updated to say: stupid WordPress. Putting an apostrophe before 08 (as: ’08) gives the wrong apostrophe. A quick look at a fave reference (Thanks Webmonkey!) gives the correct character (’) for it. Pah. We defeats the internet.



LCRW newsletter

Thu 10 May 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Table of Contents

1. Oh, Happy Day: Awards News
2. Exquisite Memoir: And Now We Are Going to Have a Party by Nicola Griffith
3. More New Releases: A t-shirt and two prints
3. Meet Us: P&S at Wiscon 31
4. Last Copies: Mecca|Mettle by Thomas M. Disch and BlöödHag; “Postcards of Doom” by 30 illustrators
5. Upcoming Projects: Matthew Hughes and Thomas M. Disch

***

Yes, that Table of Contents is actually from the Payseur & Schmidt newsletter, which you can subscribe to here and is full of interesting books that you should snap up because they are 1) beautiful 2) wow 3) unique 4) not usually reprinted 5) must be encouraged so that they keep this crazy stuff up long enough for us to finish our Epic poem on the Post Industrial Age titled Wooden Wheel Types, A Spoken History.

This week is a biggie for Small Beer, too. It’s Alan DeNiro week at the Lit Blog Coop, Monday was the publication day for Endless Things, yellow tulips came up then were eaten by bunnies in the backyard, and Generation Loss received a stunner of a review in the Washington Post (and a starred review in Booklist: buy, librarians, buy!). And we are trying to remember the recipe for LCRW. More on this stuff (and more) below. More. Losing the meaning now. More.

Hot! We are planting fruit trees. How about you?

Another TOC

Liz Hand
John Crowley
LCRW
Interfictions
Laurie J. Marks
Kelly Link

++++++

Generation Loss is the first book we’ve published by Elizabeth Hand. Yay! It is dark, unremitting, looks at art and says What the Hell? and pops a few pills on the way. Is Maine weird? Sometimes.

Liz is about to go out on tour. Hear her here. Read.
Interview on Bookslut.
Washington Post
Largehearted Boy
EW

Tonight: Thursday May 10 7 PM
Olsson’s, 7th Street NW, Washington DC 20004, 202.638.7610

Thursday May 17 7 PM
Artifacts, 28 North Maple Street, Florence, MA 01062, 413-320-9480
—reading with John Crowley, Paul Park,& others, & music from Flora Reed & Philip Price (of the Winterpills).

Friday May 18 Time TBA
Hiram Halle Memorial Library, 271 Westchester Avenue, Pound Ridge, NY 10576, (914) 764-5085

Saturday May 19 2 PM
Borders, 162 E Main St., Mt Kisco, NY 10549, (914) 241-8387

Wednesday May 23 7 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, (800) 542-READ

Megan Sullivan of Harvard Book Store recommends Generation Loss in the Boston Globe:
“This smart, dark, literary thriller will keep you up at night. A photographer who has been drinking, doing drugs, and alienating everyone around her since the ’70s goes to Maine to interview a legendary photographer and gets caught up in the case of a missing girl.”

Sunday May 27 7 PM
Sherman’s Books, 8 Bay View Street, Camden, ME 04843, 1-207-236-2223

BookExpo America
Jacob Javits Center, New York City
Signing: Sat. June 2, 12-12.30 PM
Reading: Sun. June 3 10.30 AM (Foreword Second Stage)

June 23+24
Maine Festival of the Book, Portland, ME (Reading and panel participant)

+++++++

John Crowley’s 4-part novel Aegypt is completed in Endless Things, a beautiful book that manages to end many strands of story without being elegiac or closing down the narratives — a feat few authors could handle and few readers of the series might have believed. It is a deep, sometimes hilarious, and hopeful novel that readers will be able to dig into and enjoy for long stretches of the summer.

The cover is an irresistibly attractive photograph by Rosamond Purcell from Bookworms.

John reads (with Sarah Langan) at KGB Bar in New York City on May 16 and on the 17th at Artifacts in Florence (Northampton), MA.

The first three books in the Aegpyt series are being reprinted in trade paperback by the Overlook Press beginning in autumn.

Reviews of Endless Things:
Book Forum
Green Man Review

+++++++

Want to see some neat art coming out of the Vermont Center for Cartoon Studies? Here’s a neat site from Colleen Frakes and Jon-Mikel Gates: Cowboy Orange.
We went up for a visit (in a snow storm, hard to believe now) and were blown away by the concentration of good art and artists. We’ll post more links as time goes by.

+++++++

Alan DeNiro’s collection Skinny Dipping in the Lake of the Dead is the Spring Read This! Pick (thanks, Pinky!) this week at the Lit Blog Coop.

If you loved the book or hated it, go tell them, link to it, post about it and then post about your post and call your local radio and tell them. These Lit Bloggers are the book reviewers of today and tomorrow and they are looking to talk to the whole interewebs — and get the internet talking. Their combined voices (and individually on their blogs) are an interesting strand in the cross-all-genres conversation of the moment.

One part of our contribution is an interview with Alan recorded while he was in town for the UMass Amherst Juniper Festival (he’s a good reader and a great panelist, please consider adding him to you festival!). We waited until Alan was hungry, tired, and looked like a greyhound, then got out the difficult questions. (Alan’s signature drink it…?)
Here.

+++++++

LCRW links

The new one is in the pot and getting ready to boil. Or something. The latest store to add LCRW to its backroom stores:

Magers and Quinn Booksellers
3038 Hennepin Ave. S.
Minneapolis, MN 55408

Which is a great and groovy store.

The Best of LCRW is on track for a September release from Del Rey. Wacky, no? It should be called The Best of LCRW (So Far), but that didn’t fit on the jacket. So please write that on the cover (or title page) when you get your copy.
It is an excellent book, or at least the parts not written by us are brilliant. Will the world be shaken when it comes out? It will shake with joy at Dan Chaon’s introduction. Then it will be assigned to classes and become part of the Harold Bloom-approved Western Canon. Then kids will start writing haiku as protest and we will be first up against the wall when the revolution comes. We will escape on our jetpacks. We don’t know what future you’re living in, but in ours: we have jetpacks.

+++++++

Huge local event!

A Speculatively Spectacular Evening with:

Elizabeth Hand (Generation Loss)
John Crowley (Endless Things)
Paul Park (The White Tyger)
Flora Reed & Philip Price (of the Winterpills)
& a selection of interstitial material (i.e. in the breaks) from Michael DeLuca, Jedediah Berry, Diana Gordon, &c.

Celebrate spring with Small Beer Press’s Speculatively Spectacular evening of art, readings, music, and perhaps a little more. Beginning at 7 p.m. on May 17, the event will be held at Artifacts, a new gallery at 28 North Maple Street in Florence, MA. Artifacts is housed in a converted warehouse, where guests will be able to meet the authors, listen, dance if they are so inclined, and mingle as three bestselling authors showcase their latest offerings.
John Crowley, Elizabeth Hand, and Paul Park will headline the event. Crowley, who lives in Conway and teaches at Yale, and Hand, who lives on the Maine coast, will be reading from their recently published novels. Park, who teaches at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, will read from his latest novel, The White Tyger.
A variety of other local authors will read their work, including a number of contributors to Small Beer Press’s tiny lit zine, LCRW.
The evening will be topped off by Flora Reed and Philip Price (of the critically-acclaimed Winterpills), who will provide musical entertainment.
Guests will be expected to peruse the art, be polite to the authors, provide good conversation, and, on leaving, remember where they parked their jetpacks.

————————————————————————————————————————

When: Thursday, May 17, 7 PM

Where: Artifacts
28 North Maple Street
Florence, MA 01062
413-320-9480

Art: Appropriately for Maine author Elizabeth Hand’s post-punk lit thriller Generation Loss, Artifacts will hold over the photographs from Susie J. Horgan’s Punk Love.

Music: Flora Reed & Philip Price (of the critically-acclaimed Winterpills).

Refreshments: Will be provided. As will seats, walls, windows, and doors.

Tickets: This is not a ticketed event and entrance is free.

Books: The authors’ books will be available on the night at a table manned by stalwart booksellers from Amherst Books.

+++++++

Interfictions

Ther first Interstitial Arts Foundation anthology, Interfictions, is out online and in the real world. 19 new stories at a buck a piece plus a freebie—you read it and tell us here which story is the the bonus one! The authors include newer writers as well as a few who are more well known. Adding to the depth of the book are three translations — one each from Spanish, French, and Hungarian — which goes a tiny way to filling the translation gap.

The authors involved are: Anna Tambour, Catherynne M. Valente, Christopher Barzak, Colin Greenland, Csilla Kleinheincz, Holly Phillips, Jon Singer, Joy Marchand, K. Tempest Bradford, Lea Silhol, Leslie What, Matthew Cheney, Michael J. DeLuca, Mikal Trimm, Rachel Pollack, Vandana Singh, and Veronica Schanoes.

We recently did a giveaway for copies of Interfictions. Copies went to the following readers who will paint or sing their reviews on subways near you:

Hannah Wolf Bowen
Bob Scheffel
Hyowon Kim
Nin Harris
Steph Burgis

Look out for (or instigate) interstitial events in the summer months.

+++++++

It’s Mother’s Day in the USA on May 13th. Isn’t that nice? Aren’t you going to send her chocolates? Or books? Especially as the US postal rates rise the next day. Seems like a great opportunity. Here’s one idea:

The mother of all Mother’s Day gifts–Mothers & Other Monsters.
Anyone can send Mother’s Day flowers. Mother has always said you aren’t just anyone.
A book for everyone who has ever had a mother.
Celebrate the little monster in every mom.
Mother’s Day flowers wither and candy melts. But with proper storage, Mothers & Other Monsters will last forever.

+++++++

Laurie J. Mark’s third Elemental Logic novel, Water Logic, is the first novel we’ve published in a fantasy series. So, they must be good, right? Yes. They’re right up your street. They’re smart, sexy, and political. These books use some of the familiar tropes of pastoral fantasies, but they don’t rely on them. It’s not a standard military fantasy series, it’s subversive and electric. Good things happen. Bad things happen, too. The costs of magic are high.
If you haven’t been reading and want to dive in, start with Fire Logic then Earth Logic. Water Logic, coming in June, is a knockout.

Laurie J. Marks is a Guest of Honor (with Kelly) at WisCon 31. We will have a launch party with special Things to go to those who buy the book — pre-orders will receive the one that is easier to mail. (More on these secret things later.)

Laurie has recorded a podcast (ahem) of the first chapter: Part 1, 2 — or read it here.

Laurie is reading in Albany, June 16, 2007, at Flights of Fantasy Bookstore, 488 Albany-Shaker Rd, Loudonville, NY 1221.

If you work at a bookshop and are interested in a reading copy of this, send us an email!

+++++++

Are you playing this game?

+++++++

Secret giveaway for the readers who go this far. How about you tell us which book you want? We will say no and come back to you with an offer of a Peapod Threesome for a review of at least one? A couple of these sets (tied up in a pretty ribbon) are available. Love to hear from you sweetie.

+++++++

Live in Australia? Or somewhere else? Or, nowhere, you ghost, you? How about this:

Independent Publishers – The Brave New World
Join Gavin Grant (Publisher of the US-based Small Beer Press) at 12 noon AEST on Tuesday 15 May to discuss the dynamics of US, international, and independent publishing.

+++++++

Ah, respite.

+++++++

Link links

Missed Kelly on her tour last September? Catch up with her now-not-so-super secret Authors@Google visit with Karen Joy Fowler.

This week Nancy Pearl included Magic for Beginners in one of her NPR lists (online, not on the radio): Under the Radar: Books Not to Miss, saying, “It’s intricate, wildly imaginative and totally wonderful.”

Kelly sold a young adult collection to Sharyn November at Viking. It will contain many of the stories she has been publishing in young adult anthologies as well as one new story and, since this is her first young adult collection, a couple of stories from her other books. (This last because her previous collections contain stories like Catskin which make it hard for some adults to give to young adults.) Should come out next year and will be followed by a tour (with support from the reformed Guns’n'Roses (shhh, it’s a secret) and the usual Today Show for Kids, Young Letterman!, and other age-appropriate media.

Kelly is a Guest of Honor (with Laurie J. Marks) at WisCon 31. (Hope to see you there!)

Kelly will also be at BookExpo America, Readercon, Worldcon in Japan, a Best of LCRW reading at KGB, World Fantasy in Saratogo Springs in November. Und so weiter.

This is the best way to keep up.

+++++++

We alphabetized our Shopping page which might make it easier to use. Do tell if and when you are unhappy with our website.

+++++++

Exeunt.



Paisley & McGuinness

Wed 9 May 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Ian Paisley laughing—did you ever think you’d see the day? The ongoing peace process is an amazing piece of work and everyone who has ever worked on it deserves a pint. On us, if we ever see you. Gives us hope for many other messed up places.

Northern Ireland's first minister, Ian Paisley, and the deputy first minister, Martin McGuinness, smile after being sworn in at Stormont. Photograph: Paul Faith/AP

Northern Ireland’s first minister, Ian Paisley, and the deputy first minister, Martin McGuinness, smile after being sworn in at Stormont. Photograph: Paul Faith/AP

Ian Paisley, the Democratic Unionist party leader who spent decades denouncing republicans, and Martin McGuinness, a former IRA commander, joined together yesterday to assume office as first and deputy first ministers at the head of a new power-sharing government.



Fri 20 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Julie Phillips pointed us toward this page of Alice Sheldon’s paintings.



Fri 20 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Julie Phillips pointed us toward this page of Alice Sheldon’s paintings.



Wed 18 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

UK family and friends are issued an open invite to come and visit as it looks less and less likely that we will go there as the dollar falls lower and lower. The exchange rate just hit £1 = $2.0133 Eek!

We’ve a slight hope of travelling to a lit fest in the UK in August, but good golly! The USA is a cheap place for everyone else right now, so come stay!



Wed 18 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

UK family and friends are issued an open invite to come and visit as it looks less and less likely that we will go there as the dollar falls lower and lower. The exchange rate just hit £1 = $2.0133 Eek!

We’ve a slight hope of travelling to a lit fest in the UK in August, but good golly! The USA is a cheap place for everyone else right now, so come stay!



Thu 5 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Notes from the road: we handed in the finished draft of our Year’s Best introduction. It’s huge! And we are setting off fireworks and shutting down the government tomorrow in celebration. More on that later.

  • The Albany train station has wireless, yay! Amtrak is fun — very relaxed attitude to arrival times. The St. Louis train station has been replaced by a shed. Hmm.
  • Subterranean Books in St. Louis is Awesome. Tomorrow we have to go back as they have a new exhibit, something about robot vacations.
  • Richard Butner on the renfairs.
  • The Perpetual Motion Roadshow is kaput! It was an absolute blast to go on (hi Geoffrey! hi Liisa!) and an incredible thing to be part of. Jim Munroe, who started it (and let it go, man has style!) talks lessons learned.


Thu 5 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 1 Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Notes from the road: we handed in the finished draft of our Year’s Best introduction. It’s huge! And we are setting off fireworks and shutting down the government tomorrow in celebration. More on that later.

  • The Albany train station has wireless, yay! Amtrak is fun — very relaxed attitude to arrival times. The St. Louis train station has been replaced by a shed. Hmm.
  • Subterranean Books in St. Louis is Awesome. Tomorrow we have to go back as they have a new exhibit, something about robot vacations.
  • Richard Butner on the renfairs.
  • The Perpetual Motion Roadshow is kaput! It was an absolute blast to go on (hi Geoffrey! hi Liisa!) and an incredible thing to be part of. Jim Munroe, who started it (and let it go, man has style!) talks lessons learned.


Tue 27 Mar 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 1 Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

“Grey or Gray?” someone asked recently. One of those questions that always pops up and no matter what the answer is going to leave someone unhappy (or amused at the poor choice).

Grey has that e in the middle that slides along like a car skiding on a wet street, like a cat dragging its sodden tail.

Gray has the giant space of the a encompassing the sea, the sea, and everything from ash to storms. Very overdone, very baroque, but cutting through all those down to the simplicity of itself. Gray.

Either/or, then. Depending on mood, year, weather, dinner, book last read, road last driven, election last voted on, bird just seen.

A long time ago Kelly wrote about this in The Specialist’s Hat:

Mr. Coeslak can tell the twins apart, even if their father can’t; Claire’s eyes are grey, like a cat’s fur, he says, but Samantha’s are gray, like the ocean when it has been raining.



Tue 27 Mar 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 1 Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

“Grey or Gray?” someone asked recently. One of those questions that always pops up and no matter what the answer is going to leave someone unhappy (or amused at the poor choice).

Grey has that e in the middle that slides along like a car skiding on a wet street, like a cat dragging its sodden tail.

Gray has the giant space of the a encompassing the sea, the sea, and everything from ash to storms. Very overdone, very baroque, but cutting through all those down to the simplicity of itself. Gray.

Either/or, then. Depending on mood, year, weather, dinner, book last read, road last driven, election last voted on, bird just seen.

A long time ago Kelly wrote about this in The Specialist’s Hat:

Mr. Coeslak can tell the twins apart, even if their father can’t; Claire’s eyes are grey, like a cat’s fur, he says, but Samantha’s are gray, like the ocean when it has been raining.



Not for the squeamish

Sat 24 Mar 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Fury: Manson holds a skinned fox in the ad aimed...

Shirley Manson says: “Here’s the rest of your fur coat”:That’s the rest of a fox. Manson’s pic is for PETA and one of the best parts of this piece in The Scotsman is a quote from Frank Zilberkweit, a director of the British Fur Trade Association and owner of a London furrier:

“Peta is employing a cheap stunt by using a fox carcass. It’s a cowardly and shameful attempt to try to condemn a real industry that provides employment while regulating standards in animal welfare.”

Um, yes. In the same way perhaps that euthanasia regulates standards for the elderly?

Oh come now, that’s a bit much.

Yes, but how dumb is that statement? Could someone (Mr. Zilberkweit, perhaps…?) explain exactly how it’s “cowardly” to show a fox carcass? Aren’t fox, chinchilla, mink, dog, etc. carcasses a part of your “real” industry (as opposed to say, car manufacturing, an “unreal” industry)?

http://helpinganimals.com/images/FamkeJanssen_ad.jpg

If that poster is a bit much, you can order a print quality version of this one instead and print it in glorious full color in your zine. Ladies and gentlemen: Famke Janssen!



Monkeys & others

Mon 19 Mar 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

This week Monkeybicycle.net is featuring a hilarious piece from Rob Bloom: “A Zagat Writer Reviews Everyday Life.”

Save Short Fiction Online has an offer for online zines: they will host your site for free if your mag:

  1. publishes short fiction online that is available to the public and
  2. pays its contributors.

Terri Windling and Midori Snyder, among others, are keeping it fasinating over at the Endicott blog. They recently covered the IAF blog and Interfictions (review copies are mailing now) anthology and (great title:) Monkeys and Revelations.

It’s been four years since the US invaded Iraq under false pretences. Has the monkey boy President noticed there are no WMDs, there is was no Al Queda link? Does he care? No. Are thousands of people dead? Yes. Is he to blame? Yes.

If SFWA is your thing the idealistic young whippersnapper John Scalzi, Esq., is chatting up future here.

Gwenda and Christopher, worried that small cute dogs are not properly represented in the blogarium adopt another.

Made it to the last showing of the Ateh Theater Group’s adaptation of The Girl Detective in NYC and it was great fun. There were three big dance numbers (memo to writers: make sure you include a chorus of dancing girls in all stories) and the cast, given a play which involves a lot of talking directly to the audience, seemed to be enjoying themselves. The audience seemed to like it, too—did wonder what it would be like to see the play without knowing the story. More news on another adaptation of the story to come at some point in spring (no, not a movie or TV thing).



Odd links

Tue 27 Feb 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Forgot to post these:

Ozzy is giving it away and making the man pay! That’s got to be a go Johnny, go Johnny, go go go! Ozzfest retitled Freefest.

Steve Jobs says things out to be DRM-free and no one really argues. Until EMI say Pay for Play! And people keep not buying their CDs until they realise they are hearing the sound of no cash register ringing.
Latest issue of Words Without Borders is all comics and includes “A Bomb in the Family” by David B.

Bay Area Reporter review of Brothers of the Head, coming soon on DVD.

A piece on Howard Waldrop on the Internet Review of SF (log in required).

Spooky and fantastic Pet Shop Boys video.

Maureen McHugh is part of a group blog, Eat Our Brains. (When you’re asked to comment, just say they asked for it.)

Added our April to August catalog to this page.



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