Interfictions 2—where are the paranormal cowboy romances?

Wed 15 Sep 2010 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Two reviewers look at Interfictions 2 and wonder whether interstitial is a reading protocol, a limitation, or . . . what? Is every story interstitial as Paul Di Filippo suggests in Asimov’s?

Imagine that you reprinted the entire contents selected by editors Delia Sherman and Christopher Barzak, but without any identifying matter as to its origins, and then wrapped it inside covers labeled Eclipse 3, or The Solaris Book of New Fantasy, or the January/February issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, or even The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories for 2010. Then you gave this camouflaged book to any literate yet unsuspecting reader. Would the nominated reader, after carefully perusing X number of stories, look up and say, “Wait one darn minute! These hybrid stories are too odd for their genre label! I’m really reading interstitial fiction! Not pure fantasy or pure SF or pure mimetic fiction, as advertised!

Paul goes on to ask:

One final thought experiment. The interstices explored in this volume are exclusively those between literary fiction and SF/Fantasy. Where are the stories that lie in the uncanny valleys between, say, the espionage and nurse genres, the western and the paranormal romance?

and over at The Short Review Steven Wingate likes the book . . .

Many of the stories have a devil-may-care brio to them—the verve of knowing that their experiments might not hold completely together—and that gives the book a freshness and insouciance that many “best of”-type anthologies don’t have.

and asks the same question:

There are many interstices in the world of fiction; claiming just one as “interstitial fiction” may help gain territory for one group of writers on the cusp between the mainstream and the speculative, but what does it do for those writers who labor at one of many, many other fault lines?

Since the IAF emerged from the sf&f field, it may be natural for it to have some bent toward that genre but the stories in Interfictions 2 came from an open submission period so the answer to the above question is either in the editors’ preferences or in the population that submitted work. One of the simplest yet hardest part of editing is that you can only publish what you’re sent. Gordon Van Gelder has a great take on this. He advises writers not to edit his magazine: in other words, don’t think you know what he wants, send your story along and let him decide.

And now the book is out, it’s up to the readers to decide!



ad op

Fri 26 Jun 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 3 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

we’ve been offered a spot in an ad with some other publishers — it will be 4 books on a page with some text and the covers — in a national pop culture mag. Cost is $9,100. Anyone want to pay up? Come on, what else are you going to do with Aunt Aggie’s bequest?

(We will give you some books, and, er, stand you a drink or two when we next see you.)



Tue 11 Nov 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Listen to Ben Parzybok on kboo.fm today at 1.30 EST (10.30 PST).

  • SciFi Dimensions is having their annual auction—so you can go pick up some good books and support the site, including Couch and The King’s Last Song.
  • Tamora Pierce on Pretty Monsters; PM is a Staff Pick at Powell’s; Creative Commons blog; what about that YA label; a book collector writes about PM and The Serial Garden;  an illustration for Stranger Things Happen.
  • A week late: slow zombies, please: “Zombies are our destiny writ large. Slow and steady in their approach, weak, clumsy, often absurd, the zombie relentlessly closes in, unstoppable, intractable.”
  • Go on: declare yourself Indiebound.
  • Leslie & the Badgers “Old Timers” is sweet.
  • Garrison Keillor (sorry Alan!) gives the Pres-Elect some good advice.
  • A review of LCRW 21 on Xerography Debt. The good news from Davida is that the print edition will keep going by partnering with Microcosm for printing and distribution (so keep sending zines in for review!):
  • “I very much enjoyed reading LCRW #21; it’s primarily fiction but also includes poetry, nonfiction, and comics. The layout and design is impeccable: crisp, clean, beautifully formatted. Carol Emshwiller is a regular contributor and the material itself covers a wide range, from odd boarding schools to a strange co-worker writing code (I don’t want to say much more for fear of giving it away), and there isn’t a single wrong note in here.”
  • Michelle Tea, Jess Arndt, Andrea Lawlor, Miel Rose, Sara Jaffe read in Northampton on Friday, 11/14, 8 PM, at Pride & Joy.

Circuit City: why does none of the coverage of CC’s bankruptcy cover the part where they fired all their long-term staff and hired people who didn’t know anything about what they were selling and sales, duh, fell?

Duh again: The government doesn’t want to prop up the car companies: yay! These same companies have been selling more fuel-efficient cars in Asia and Europe than here. And now they’re surprised to find that this may have been a mistake.



Tue 11 Nov 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | 5 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

Listen to Ben Parzybok on kboo.fm today at 1.30 EST (10.30 PST).

  • SciFi Dimensions is having their annual auction—so you can go pick up some good books and support the site, including Couch and The King’s Last Song.
  • Tamora Pierce on Pretty Monsters; PM is a Staff Pick at Powell’s; Creative Commons blog; what about that YA label; a book collector writes about PM and The Serial Garden;  an illustration for Stranger Things Happen.
  • A week late: slow zombies, please: “Zombies are our destiny writ large. Slow and steady in their approach, weak, clumsy, often absurd, the zombie relentlessly closes in, unstoppable, intractable.”
  • Go on: declare yourself Indiebound.
  • Leslie & the Badgers “Old Timers” is sweet.
  • Garrison Keillor (sorry Alan!) gives the Pres-Elect some good advice.
  • A review of LCRW 21 on Xerography Debt. The good news from Davida is that the print edition will keep going by partnering with Microcosm for printing and distribution (so keep sending zines in for review!):
  • “I very much enjoyed reading LCRW #21; it’s primarily fiction but also includes poetry, nonfiction, and comics. The layout and design is impeccable: crisp, clean, beautifully formatted. Carol Emshwiller is a regular contributor and the material itself covers a wide range, from odd boarding schools to a strange co-worker writing code (I don’t want to say much more for fear of giving it away), and there isn’t a single wrong note in here.”
  • Michelle Tea, Jess Arndt, Andrea Lawlor, Miel Rose, Sara Jaffe read in Northampton on Friday, 11/14, 8 PM, at Pride & Joy.

Circuit City: why does none of the coverage of CC’s bankruptcy cover the part where they fired all their long-term staff and hired people who didn’t know anything about what they were selling and sales, duh, fell?

Duh again: The government doesn’t want to prop up the car companies: yay! These same companies have been selling more fuel-efficient cars in Asia and Europe than here. And now they’re surprised to find that this may have been a mistake.



Sun 20 Jul 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Amusing and impressing us:

The image “http://www.steveschofield.co.uk/images/galleries/scifi/lotf_new_007.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.



Sun 20 Jul 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Amusing and impressing us:

The image “http://www.steveschofield.co.uk/images/galleries/scifi/lotf_new_007.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.



KJF

Wed 20 Feb 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Inferno CoverKGB reading tonight features many mighty fine writers from Ellen Datlow’s Inferno: P.D. Cacek, John Grant, Jeff Ford, Elizabeth Bear, and Nathan Ballingrud.

Karen Joy Fowler’s new novel is just a fantastic read. More on it when the pub date comes round. There’s a small piece on her worth reading at the NBCC blog.

Border’s have mashed-up (says Ed Nawotka) the real and virtual worlds in their new Ann Arbor store. Looks like fun. Burn a Neko Case CD, download something or other, have a cup of tea, then go buy some books (and maybe LCRW) at Shaman Drum—Mary Doria Russell is on their front page. Now that’s a good bookshop.



Happy Spiderwick Day

Thu 14 Feb 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Today most people in the western world are celebrating the 42nd* anniversary of the decimalization of the Australian currency.

Besides reading Garth Nix and Margo Lanagan, drinking some decent wine, and wishing it were summer, we’re also celebrating the release of the Spiderwick movie from the ton of fun books by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black.

* Pre-decimalization it would have been the 4 pun, twa shillin an sixpence anniversary.



Lazy update without links

Mon 4 Feb 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

We are behind! Not you, you paranoiac fool. More along the lines of behind and with you. Or something. Especially if you have sent us something to read. Because there is an awful lot of stuff waiting to be read for

  1. LCRW — we are behind! Will we catch up by the end of the month? Only time will tell!
  2. Small Beer submissions: we are buying a book that came in on a quer, which we think may be the first time we’ve done this. Which means that for now we will keep reading queries. (Unsolicited advice to writers: target those queries!)
  3. The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror: we have decided (as we are the deciders) that we will reprint the 2008 speeches of George W. Bus. No, wait, that’s the horror half. Will check with Ellen and see if she will go for it. Really: we are nearly done reading. Just the damn honorable mentions, introductions, and summary to do. Cough.
  4. Review: Jo Graham’s Black Ships is fun.

Stuff for Bostonians:

  1. Boskone will be going on soon and we will have books for sale. Whoopee, you say, as do we. Maybe we will surprise you and have John Kessel’s book for sale. Just kidding, because we won’t.
  2. Here is something more interesting: go see the Massachusetts Book Awards this Thursday at 1.30 PM on the Grand Staircase at the State House. An event on a staircase has all kinds of possibilities for sweeping entrances, banister hijinks, slips, falls, chandelier swinging, etc.
  3. Vericon: hey, that was a fun convention!

Stuff for New Yorkers:

  1. New York is Book Country has moved their book festival to Sept. 21—the week after the Brooklyn Book Fair (see you there on Sept. 14th). They have booths, not tables so it doesn’t look like we’ll be there.
  2. We will be at Think Cup Cafe on Feb 13 with Carol Emshwiller (who you can also hear tomorrow night with John Langan at the NYRSF reading) with Ellen Kushner, Delia Sherman, and Veronica Schanoes.
  3. Ok, so we will be at KGB Bar on Feb 20th with everyone in the world, even the seen-it-all Mr. Richard Bowes.
  4. And we might be at The New School on Feb 27th for the Story Prize night: Tessa Hadley, Vincent Lam, and Jim Shepard are up this year.

That, as Mr. Hodgman is wont to say, is all.



Cut the meat

Tue 29 Jan 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

In the NY Times Mark Bittman (who writes the Minimalist column in the Dining sections, is the author of “How to Cook Everything Vegetarian” and is not a vegetarian) stumbles over his place in time and refers to “growing meat” instead of raising animals.

That cook book is great—picked it up in Oberlin at (maybe?) Mindfair Books—and it has already seen some use. (Not bad around here where cookbooks can lie around uncracked for centuries.)

However Mr. Bittman must be thinking of the near future when “meat” is grown in vats or tubes or whatever and its production doesn’t involve a slaughterhouse. At the moment when someone eats meat, it’s likely they’re eating one of 10 billion animals (this year) that will cross the definitional line from animal meat on the killing floor.

Hopefully this is thought-provoking stuff:

Americans eat about the same amount of meat as we have for some time, about eight ounces a day, roughly twice the global average. At about 5 percent of the world’s population, we “process” (that is, grow and kill) nearly 10 billion animals a year, more than 15 percent of the world’s total….

…. an estimated 30 percent of the earth’s ice-free land is directly or indirectly involved in livestock production, according to the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization, which also estimates that livestock production generates nearly a fifth of the world’s greenhouse gases — more than transportation.

…. Animal welfare may not yet be a major concern, but as the horrors of raising meat in confinement become known, more animal lovers may start to react. And would the world not be a better place were some of the grain we use to grow meat directed instead to feed our fellow human beings?

Real prices of beef, pork and poultry have held steady, perhaps even decreased, for 40 years or more (in part because of grain subsidies)….



Gavin’s daemon

Tue 11 Dec 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

A little late, as per usual, with the memes. Thought the film was quite good, although the rhythm of the ending was all wrong, but c’est la vie. Armored bears!



Evolutionary reading

Tue 20 Nov 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: intern

Hope you are enjoying Michael’s posts on literary beer. (Mmm, beer.) More posts from Howard Waldrop are expected in a while—he’s got some stories to write which pay even better (cough) than this gig.

And in the meantime here’s something from intern, Margaret Kinney:

It is holiday time. People will be telling you that you, that we, have forgotten the true meaning of Christmas. They may mean Jesus, or pure giving or love, or something vague like that. Nowadays, they will also be telling you that, by forgetting this meaning and engaging instead in an orgy of materialism, you are destroying the environment and contributing to our wasteful, consumerist culture. But more people will be telling you that Christmas is a time for giving, abundant giving, and that you need to come to their store and spend, spend, spend on whatever it is that will assuredly make you and everyone you love so happy. And I believe them. And so do you. And we will buy things and wrap them in wasteful, shiny papers, and set them in heaps until we unwrap them together and glow with happiness just like the ads promised. Those naysayers above offer various reasons for this; we are sinful, greedy, taken in by modern temptations, we are shortsighted, our culture is irredeemably materialistic. Yes, probably. But maybe there is something else.

Read more



Ethical credit cards?

Tue 6 Nov 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

In the UK the link between personal spending and personal ethics are openly acknowledged and talked about in articles on the MSN, the Thrifty Scot (ahem), and in The Guardian:

This week the Co-op Bank launched a new credit card called “think”, which offers a lower rate of interest for designated ethical purchases via a link-up with partners including Ikea, cosmetics firm Lush, green electricity company Ecotricity, bikes giant Raleigh and fair trade organisation Traidcraft.

The first time the card is used, the bank will arrange for half an acre of Brazilian rainforest to be bought and protected in the customer’s name. Also, for every £100 spent on the card, 25p will be donated to the charity Cool Earth, which protects rainforests.

In the US there are “affinity” cards where donations in the range of  0.25 – 0.75% of spending go to the charity (or whatever) the individual wants to support.

Of course there’s also Working Assets but their credit card program is run by FIA, who are formerly MNBA—associated or owned or the same thing as the massive and depressingly willing to squeeze the last drop of air from your dying throat, Bank of America. Which isn’t really a friendly happy company.

After looking at some comparison websites and so on, there don’t yet seem to be ethics-slanted credit cards on the US market. So what’s left? Cash rewards and donations to charities of choice? Give it up and just go for the airline miles? Hmm.



Year’s Best Fantasy ’06

Mon 22 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

We completely missed the best fantasy of 2006: The Amazing Mrs. Pritchard. It was shown in the UK in 2006 and just started on PBS.

[Spoilers] Jane Horrocks plays a supermarket manager who starts a new political party and pulls off a democratic revolution basically replacing all the grey old men in power with women and not really commenting on that aspect of it.[/Spoilers]

Wikipedia says it could be all down hill from the first couple of episodes, but who cares? Some reviews like it. Could there be a independent revolution in the USA? Um, only dreaming, guv, no need to bring up Guantanamo Bay.

Other stuff:
Also: saw The Jane Austen Book Club the other day. Hey, not bad! And someone pointed us to this picture of the author, the screenwriter, and that guy from Buffy.

United Airlines has a nice call out to Interfictions in their inflight mag Hemispheres. (Thanks Ellen!)

A review of Iain Banks’ new novel The Steep Approach to Garbadale.

Magic for beginners by Kelly LinkOn Library Thing someone has the pretty pretty Romanian cover of Magic for Beginners.And Mario Guslandi  flexes his brain around The Best… in the Agony Column.

Somehow missed Colleen Cahill‘s review of The Best of LCRW in SF Revu (found due to noodling around Library Thing!). She notices our penchant for:

“. . . poetry with intriguing titles, as in Sunshine Ison’s “The Posthumous Voyages of Christopher Columbus,” and “Lady Shonagon’s Hateful Things” by Margaret Muirhead. . . .

Eclectic, heart-warming, cautionary, funny, informative, and most of all enthralling best describe this book. You will find no better place to explore this outstanding and unique publication: I highly recommend you pick up a copy today.”



Our town needs Christopher Rowe

Thu 11 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

bike wranglerThere’s an excellent article about our favorite Yellow Bike Wrangler, Christopher Rowe, in the Lexington Weekly . . . which made us think how cool it would be if we had a Yellow Bike Program. Hmm. Wonder if we can make that happen.

Also, we’ve given many sets of Heifer‘s Bees and Trees, how cool would it be to give a town a bike?



Fri 5 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

From Critical Mass:

Yesterday, former NBCC finalist Edwidge Danticat testified before the U.S. Congress’ Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security and International Law. It is our priviledge to publish the text of this powerful testimony — which is the basis of her new memoir, “Brother, I’m Dying” – here.

Danticat’s testimony.



Fri 5 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

From Critical Mass:

Yesterday, former NBCC finalist Edwidge Danticat testified before the U.S. Congress’ Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security and International Law. It is our priviledge to publish the text of this powerful testimony — which is the basis of her new memoir, “Brother, I’m Dying” – here.

Danticat’s testimony.



Mon 1 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sign your name, maybe help the Burmese? Who knows. Worth a try. Sign, forward, etc.

—– Original Message —–
From: Ricken Patel –  <mailto:[email protected]> Avaaz.org
To: [email protected]
Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 1:50 PM
Subject: Burma: Stop the Bloodshed

Dear friends,

The worst is happening – over the last few days, Burma’s generals have unleashed terror on the peaceful monks and protesters: shooting and beating many to death, and taking others away to torture chambers where at this moment they must be enduring the unbearable.

We can stop this horror. Burma’s powerful sponsor China can halt the killing, if it believes that its international reputation and the 2008 Olympics in Beijing depend on it. To convince the Chinese government, Avaaz is launching a major global and Asian ad campaign on Tuesday that will deliver our message and the number of signers. Our petition has exploded to over 200,000 signers in just 72 hours, but we need 1 million voices to be the global roar that will get China’s attention. If every one of us forwards this email to just 20 friends, we’ll reach our target in the next 72 hours. Please sign the petition at the link below -if you haven’t already- and forward this email to everyone you care about:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/stand_with_burma/p.php

The petition will also be delivered to the UN Secretary-General, and we will broadcast the news of our effort over radio to Burma’s people, telling them not to lose hope, that the world is with them.

The Burmese people are showing incredible courage in the face of horror. The fate of many brave and good people is in our hands, we must help them – and we have hours, not days, to do it. Please sign the petition and forward this email to at least 20 friends right now.

With hope and determination,

Ricken, Paul, Pascal, Graziela, Galit, Ben, Milena and the whole Avaaz Team

PS: if you would like to join in the massive wave of demonstrations happening around the world at Burmese and Chinese embassies, scroll down our petition page for details of times and events.

_____________________________________
Please add [email protected] to your address book to make sure you keep receiving emails from Avaaz. Avaaz.org is staffed by a global team of campaigners operating on 3 continents. We have administrative offices in London, New York, and Rio de Janeiro. Please direct mail to our NY office at 260 Fifth Avenue, 9th floor, New York, NY 10001 U.S.A.



Mon 1 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sign your name, maybe help the Burmese? Who knows. Worth a try. Sign, forward, etc.

—– Original Message —–
From: Ricken Patel –  <mailto:[email protected]> Avaaz.org
To: [email protected]
Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 1:50 PM
Subject: Burma: Stop the Bloodshed

Dear friends,

The worst is happening – over the last few days, Burma’s generals have unleashed terror on the peaceful monks and protesters: shooting and beating many to death, and taking others away to torture chambers where at this moment they must be enduring the unbearable.

We can stop this horror. Burma’s powerful sponsor China can halt the killing, if it believes that its international reputation and the 2008 Olympics in Beijing depend on it. To convince the Chinese government, Avaaz is launching a major global and Asian ad campaign on Tuesday that will deliver our message and the number of signers. Our petition has exploded to over 200,000 signers in just 72 hours, but we need 1 million voices to be the global roar that will get China’s attention. If every one of us forwards this email to just 20 friends, we’ll reach our target in the next 72 hours. Please sign the petition at the link below -if you haven’t already- and forward this email to everyone you care about:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/stand_with_burma/p.php

The petition will also be delivered to the UN Secretary-General, and we will broadcast the news of our effort over radio to Burma’s people, telling them not to lose hope, that the world is with them.

The Burmese people are showing incredible courage in the face of horror. The fate of many brave and good people is in our hands, we must help them – and we have hours, not days, to do it. Please sign the petition and forward this email to at least 20 friends right now.

With hope and determination,

Ricken, Paul, Pascal, Graziela, Galit, Ben, Milena and the whole Avaaz Team

PS: if you would like to join in the massive wave of demonstrations happening around the world at Burmese and Chinese embassies, scroll down our petition page for details of times and events.

_____________________________________
Please add [email protected] to your address book to make sure you keep receiving emails from Avaaz. Avaaz.org is staffed by a global team of campaigners operating on 3 continents. We have administrative offices in London, New York, and Rio de Janeiro. Please direct mail to our NY office at 260 Fifth Avenue, 9th floor, New York, NY 10001 U.S.A.



Thu 27 Sep 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Futurama Wall Calendar CoverWe’ve been picking up the Futurama calendars for a couple of years (they match the Greenpeace ones surprisingly well) and really enjoying the notes (such as the one on April 3, 2008: “Read Jeffrey Ford’s The Empire of Ice Cream“).

We kept the 2007 edition open at the centerfold (huge bees!) and missed looking at the actual months until yesterday when we picked up the 2008 edition and found that one of Kelly’s hopes and dreams had been fulfilled and she hadn’t known it. Her birthday is listed in the calendar. Wow, is all that can be said.



Thu 27 Sep 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 4 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

Futurama Wall Calendar CoverWe’ve been picking up the Futurama calendars for a couple of years (they match the Greenpeace ones surprisingly well) and really enjoying the notes (such as the one on April 3, 2008: “Read Jeffrey Ford’s The Empire of Ice Cream“).

We kept the 2007 edition open at the centerfold (huge bees!) and missed looking at the actual months until yesterday when we picked up the 2008 edition and found that one of Kelly’s hopes and dreams had been fulfilled and she hadn’t known it. Her birthday is listed in the calendar. Wow, is all that can be said.



Barzak

Tue 28 Aug 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

chris barzak catches me catching himBarzakian Secrets of the Barzakian Plan for Barzakian Galactic Domination:

1. Wear great shirts.

P1030381.JPG2. Get on the Colbert Report.

3. If (2) does not work: Dance them to death. However. There has to be dance practice. And perhaps karaoke. But no mp3s of the performance, please!

Higgins, Lanke, Martocci, Barzak4. Get old before everyone else and get photographed at a party or a wedding to prove it. Pick him out if you can!

Blow Em Out!5. Then surprise and horrify everyone by becoming younger and younger every year.

6. Favor sloth but practice the opposite.

7. Design (but have someone else host) A Mad Tea Party.

8. Live on the edge of a verb. A noun. Or an adjective.

9. Get your international freak on.

10. Have local pop star write a song about you. (Wait, he already did that.)

11. Write a novel.

12. Publish novel today.

13. Take over blogosphere for 24 hours. Have the print and TV media in your town pick it up. Become a star. Shine, baby, shine.



Tue 21 Aug 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 5 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

Something for New Yorkers from Keith Snyder:

The NYC premiere of I LOVE YOU, I’M SORRY, AND I’LL NEVER DO IT AGAIN will be Saturday, August 25 at the ACE Film Festival in Manhattan.

This is the short crime musical I wrote and directed that I’ve been working on for the last two years. Admission is $12, and that gets you into all the films at the ACE Film Festival that day, not just this one. The only place that price is available is at my website: http://www.woollymammoth.com/iloveyou. I bought a big block of these day passes so I could offer them at a price that made sense. (If you just show up that day, they’re $40 at the door.)

August 25
3:00 PM
Broad Street Ballroom
41 Broad Street (across from the New York Stock Exchange)
New York City
Cast/crew/friends hang afterwards: Ulysses, 95 Pearl Street

You’ll receive an email after the purchase with all the will-call details, etc.



Tue 21 Aug 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Something for New Yorkers from Keith Snyder:

The NYC premiere of I LOVE YOU, I’M SORRY, AND I’LL NEVER DO IT AGAIN will be Saturday, August 25 at the ACE Film Festival in Manhattan.

This is the short crime musical I wrote and directed that I’ve been working on for the last two years. Admission is $12, and that gets you into all the films at the ACE Film Festival that day, not just this one. The only place that price is available is at my website: http://www.woollymammoth.com/iloveyou. I bought a big block of these day passes so I could offer them at a price that made sense. (If you just show up that day, they’re $40 at the door.)

August 25
3:00 PM
Broad Street Ballroom
41 Broad Street (across from the New York Stock Exchange)
New York City
Cast/crew/friends hang afterwards: Ulysses, 95 Pearl Street

You’ll receive an email after the purchase with all the will-call details, etc.



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