Small Beer Press Bestsellers 2012

Mon 7 Jan 2013 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: intern

According to Neilsen BookScan, our top five Small Beer Press bestsellers (excluding ebooks) for 2012 were:

  1. Maureen F. McHugh, After the Apocalypse
  2. Ursula K. Le Guin, The Unreal and the Real: Selected Stories of Ursula K. Le Guin
    Ursula K. Le Guin, The Unreal and the Real: Selected Stories of Ursula K. Le Guin
  3. Kij Johnson, At the Mouth of the River of Bees
  4. Ted Chiang, Stories of Your Life and Others
  5. Eduardo Jiménez Mayo & Chris N. Brown, eds., Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Stories of the Fantastic

All short story collections or anthologies! Our publication dates all crept into the latter half of the year, really the last couple of months, so books such as Errantry and Earth and Air didn’t get much time out there in the world to see how they’d do. Also #6? Stranger Things Happen, #7? The Serial Garden. Short stories!



Library Journal says you might like this book

Fri 30 Sep 2011 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

There was actual whooping in the office today when this came in!

Library Journal
October 1, 2011
Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Short Stories of the Fantastic
Edited by Eduardo Jiménez Mayo and Chris N. Brown, Small Beer Press,  9781931520317

“Encompassing a definition of fantasy that includes the extraterrestrial, the supernatural, the macabre, and the spectral, these stories are set in unusual locales and deal with bizarre characters. All are very short (some just two pages), and most offer a surprise twist at the end, though occasionally the only reaction these endings may elicit from the reader is “Huh?” The universal scope of the themes transcends the Mexican provenance; for example, one detects an apocalyptic influence in Liliana V. Blum’s “Pink Lemonade,” and Argentine Julio Cortázar’s “Bestiary” influences Bernardo Fernández’s “Lions.” Most of the volume’s 34 authors, half of whom are women, are relatively unknown to American readers, and for many of them, publication in this anthology represents their first exposure to an English-reading audience. The translations, several of which were done by the editors, convey the individuality, if not idiosyncrasies, of these tales. VERDICT This collection will appeal mostly to fans of fantasy and sf and, to a lesser degree, those interested in contemporary Mexican literature.”



To read pile and oops

Mon 28 Mar 2011 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Flurb has a new issue, guest edited by Eileen Gunn which features three authors who also have stories in Three Messages and a Warning: Contemporary Mexican Stories of the Fantastic: Bef, or, Bernardo Fernández, Pepe Rojo, and Alberto Chimal. And, the stories are available in English or Spanish: nice.

If you’re in the Easthampton area, the Garage Annex runs some lovely classes including this weekend letterpressing class with Art Larson that Kelly and I did a couple of years ago.

The Tiptree Award! You have, I hope, gone and read this post already but if not: go on! After being a juror a couple of years ago I know the work that goes in to making the honor list so that now, even more than before, I think the honor list is a real honor and makes for a great reading list.(And: Meeks is on the long list, so yay!)

In the Wiscon newsletter they noted that the James Tiptree, Jr. Award Motherboard “was selected as the recipient of the 2011 Clareson Award. . . . The award is presented at the annual SFRA conference, which will be held this year in Lublin, Poland. Founding members Karen Joy Fowler and Pat Murphy will travel to Poland in July 2011 to accept the award.” I’d never heard of this award but this is lovely new!

And: my laptop died. Oops. So if you try and contact Small Beer/Weightless and don’t hear back it’s because I am doing my damndest (sacrificing chocolate bars, weeping in my beer) to rescue the damned drive and/or get a new one. Yes, I do seem to have a mildly deleterious effect on technology, why do you ask?