Boom! New Books for 2017

Wed 7 Dec 2016 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Should democracy survive in this sometimes lovely country in 2017 we will publish these books:

1. Sofia Samatar, Tender: Stories
This is a ridiculously good book. Twenty stories including two new stories which — POP! there goes my mind.

2. Laurie J. Marks, Fire Logic and Earth Logic in paperback. The ebooks are out but these trade paperbacks coming out is us building toward publishing the fourth and final Elemental Logic novel, Air Logic.

3. Kij Johnson, The River Bank: A sequel to Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willows. Illustrated throughout by Kathleen Jennings.
A book that came to us out of the blue and a reminder that there can be joy in the world.

4. Christopher Rowe, Telling the Map: Stories
Sometimes you wait a long time and then a good thing happens. This book ranges out from now in Kentucky to who knows where or when. And: wow.

5. Sarah Rees Brennan, In Other Lands: a novel
This is the funniest epic-not-epic fantasy you’ll read next year.

None of the covers are 100% final.

And, fingers crossed, there will be more books later in the year.

I owe an apology and a great debt of thanks to the authors for their immense patience as work slowed and stalled during and after this most recent election. Sorry. Putting out a new issue of LCRW helped with getting me back into doing things and not just calling senators and despairing.

I feel silly and melodramatic to be worried about democracy — not perhaps the best form of government, but the best I’ve seen yet — and to think that I and others can work to keep this country from becoming a militarized plutocracy/kleptocracy. This election that among others things was influenced by the Russian government…

…(oh that that were a conspiracy theory), this convulsion away from liberalism and toward a much darker, narrower future is horrifying and must be fought.

For now, we will fight one book at a time.



Tom Canty art, signed books by Kelly, more more more

Thu 20 May 2010 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , , | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

Here is a tiny note to ignore. In fact, skip this para and go right to the next one. If you do read this, please don’t go bid against us for the Thomas Canty-illustrated copy of Water Logic—which is part of the auction to raise money for Laurie J. Marks’s wife, Deb Mensinger’s liver transplant.

Ok, so you skipped that paragraph. Thank you! But before you read on to find out what exciting things are happening here (alchemy! we turn art into commerce!) how about bidding on this copy of Water Logic customized with an original drawing by Thomas Canty ? Yay!

Bid!

And, they just posted this offer: all of Kelly’s collections either signed or personalized to you. You know we’re not going anywhere for a while so if you’d like a signed copy, this is your best chance for, what, a year at least?

Today’s featured (starred!) review on Booklist is Karen Lord’s Redemption in Indigo! That cover is not the actual cover, everyone will be relieved to know. The final cover is almost done, the interior is done (sorry, not being printed in indigo ink), so off to the printer it will go. This is the first novel you’re going to love and you will be so happy to be one of the readers who can say I was there when . . .

New Zealanders—this one is for you! “Next week (May 24 – 28) ‘Good Morning‘ book reviewer Laura Kroetsch is looking at Pretty Monsters by Kelly Link (Text, 9781921656361)” + 2 other books! (Thanks Renee!)

Edward Gauvin is fighting a valiant battle against those who think Georges-Olivier Châteaureynaud is a Kurt Vonnegut literary game.

The strenuousness of these assertions–mine and publisher Small Beer’s–should not, I repeat, decidedly not be construed as protest, or evidence of insincerity. That is all.

In the meantime, A Life on Paper has shipped from the printer and will be hitting stores in a week or two—reviews should then pile in. Who isn’t going to review a major French author’s first work in English? Here’s a story from the book, “The Excursion,” in (the fantastically named) Joyland.

Over there in October (since all time exists at all times if you look sideways from here you can see October) we’re in the middle of publishing Kathe Koja’s Under the Poppy—and part of the fun is the stage show which will debut next February (look a bit more to the side, there it is! Phew, sexy!). Kathe’s joined Kickstarter to raise some knicker money (so that the knickers can later be dropped? There’s a vaudeville joke in there somewhere) for the girls Under the Poppy, which is, natch, a Victorian brothel.

Inside baseball time: we just presented our autumn and winter titles to our sales reps and it was fun to see the reactions from the sales reps so yay for that. We’re lucky in that we have a team of sales reps (Consortium’s) who read a ton (some of them had already read some of these books from early ebook versions we’d sent ahead) and like the slightly weird stuff we give them.

Also: how many times a book is sold:

  1. By the author to the agent
  2. agent to editor
  3. editor to publisher and sales team and whoever else
  4. sales team to sales reps
    1. publicist to reviewers/editors
    2. reviewer to editor (or vice versa)
  5. sales reps to the booksellers (or to the bookstore chain buyers)
  6. bookseller to you

There are probably a few more steps in there!



Tiptree

Fri 18 Apr 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Marks, Water LogicCongratulations to Sarah Hall for the Tiptree Award for The Carhullan Army. (published in the US as Daughters of the North.) It’s an excellent book and Gavin hopes there will be something that good this year as he is one of the judges!

We mentioned the other day that Interfictions was on the Honor List and we are incredibly proud and happy to note that Laurie J. Marks‘s novel Water Logic was also on the Honor List: pick up the book from us, by mail order, or Powells, BookSense.com, or on Fictionwise.

It’s been fun to see the reaction to the question “are awards worthwhile?” over the last week. How about: it depends? (The answer to everything!) It depends on: whether you trust the jury for some awards; if you follow the will of the populace (online or otherwise); whether you think a self-limited interest group of some sort will produce an interesting list of books. The Tiptree Award seems worthwhile in that the jury redefines the definition every year and produces some great reading lists—as well as the occasional head scratcher.

Laurie’s book—and the rest of the Honor List—is a book which, besides being a dark, thoughtful , entertaining pageturner, makes people think. It’s a noisy world and anything that encourages people to stop and think is excellent.

Here’s the full Honor List (via Gwenda):

  • “Dangerous Space” by Kelley Eskridge, in the author’s collection Dangerous Space (Aqueduct Press, 2007)
  • Water Logic by Laurie Marks (Small Beer Press, 2007)
  • Empress of Mijak and The Riven Kingdom by Karen Miller (HarperCollins, Australia, 2007)
  • The Shadow Speaker by Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu (Hyperion, 2007)
  • Interfictions, edited by Delia Sherman and Theodora Goss (Interstitial Arts Foundation/Small Beer Press, 2007)
  • Glasshouse by Charles Stross (Ace, 2006)
  • The Margarets by Sheri S. Tepper (Harper Collins 2007)
  • Y: The Last Man, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Pia Guerra (available in 60 issues or 10 volumes from DC/Vertigo Comics, 2002-2008)
  • Flora Segunda by Ysabeau Wilce (Harcourt, 2007)


Crowley in London, L.A.

Sat 3 Nov 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

and other disingenuous titles. Actually, the London Review of Books. Has to be read on paper, one copy of which John will receive in, yes, Saratoga. Where much swapping of paper will occur.

Tomorrow in Ed Park’s L.A. Times column, Astral Weeks, he writes about Endless Things and the conclusion of the whole shebang:

The “Aegypt” cycle has always been about its own slow process, its private alchemy, its impossibility, but in the brisk “Endless Things” Crowley dismantles the machinery while dazzling us, showing how each part gleams.

Also, Strange Horizons are reviewing all the World Fantasy Award novel finalists—including The Privilege of the Sword.

More reviews:

Interfictions at Fantasy Book Spot.

Water Logic at the Feminist Review.

LCRW 20 at Horrorscope.



The Top 11 Lesbian/Bi Moments in Sci Fi and Fantasy

Tue 16 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Ok, this is cool. Someone — who just joined After Ellen a couple of days ago and was a Tiptree judge (so we could probably work out who, but where’s the fun in that? —has a list of The Top 11 Lesbian/Bi Moments in Sci Fi and Fantasy and after Xena, Buffy, and so on, the top one is

Fire Logic Cover1. Zanja Awakens Karis Fire Logic (2002)

Who hasn’t felt the earth move in that first explosive skin-to-skin meeting with a lover? For Zanja and Karis in Laurie J. Marks’ Fire Logic, the earth not only moves, it actually begins to heal, and I’m not talking about metaphor here. That’s why this scene tops my list of the best lesbian/bi moments in science fiction and fantasy.

Cool!



Mon 16 Jul 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

On SF Site Margo MacDonald writes:

I have just finished reading the second and third books in Laurie J. Marks’ Elemental Logic series (which began with Fire Logic in 2002) and I am now sitting here asking myself why her books aren’t on everybody’s shelves, holding a place of honour right up there with Robin Hobb and Kage Baker? Despite having written eight novels since the 80s, Marks still remains somewhat on the fringes of the SF world, embraced by a dedicated group of fans but a relative stranger to the SF community at large. True it doesn’t help that some of her best work is out of print (Dancing Jack, for one), but with the publication of Water Logic by Small Beer Press (and the fact that the first two books in the series are still available from Tor), no one now has an excuse to avoid discovering this marvelous author.

And it got me to wondering: who is reading Water Logic?A quick search finds the following: See Light, Coffee & Ink, Heather (tea still TK, Sorry!), Meghan, Plaid Adder, Liz Henry, and a Melissa.

See what’s missing? The guys. But . . . why? These are amazing books, smart, sexy, political fantasy. So here’s a challenge for guys who read fantasy—novels and series—read these books!



Mon 16 Jul 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

On SF Site Margo MacDonald writes:

I have just finished reading the second and third books in Laurie J. Marks’ Elemental Logic series (which began with Fire Logic in 2002) and I am now sitting here asking myself why her books aren’t on everybody’s shelves, holding a place of honour right up there with Robin Hobb and Kage Baker? Despite having written eight novels since the 80s, Marks still remains somewhat on the fringes of the SF world, embraced by a dedicated group of fans but a relative stranger to the SF community at large. True it doesn’t help that some of her best work is out of print (Dancing Jack, for one), but with the publication of Water Logic by Small Beer Press (and the fact that the first two books in the series are still available from Tor), no one now has an excuse to avoid discovering this marvelous author.

And it got me to wondering: who is reading Water Logic?A quick search finds the following: See Light, Coffee & Ink, Heather (tea still TK, Sorry!), Meghan, Plaid Adder, Liz Henry, and a Melissa.

See what’s missing? The guys. But . . . why? These are amazing books, smart, sexy, political fantasy. So here’s a challenge for guys who read fantasy—novels and series—read these books!



Tea!

Wed 20 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

In Laurie J. Marks’s fabby new novel Water Logic some of the characters have been known to sit around and drink tea. (Although Laurie says she’s more of a coffee drinker!)

And for those of them that like tea we have, as they say, just the thing: travel tins (1 ounce, that would be 28g) of Evening Escape, a blend of good black teas (with blue cornflower petals for an added dash of color). See attached pics of this morning’s brewery action for more details.

“And?” you say.

Send us a link (or mail us a copy) of your review of Water Logic and we’ll send you a tin of the tea (US + Canada only, sorry: unless your review is in The Guardian or something).

We only have a small number of these left (most have booksellers’ names on them!) but we’ll wait around and send them in a week or two to give people a chance to get their reviews out there.

Early reviews are coming in (no cribbing, naughty tea drinker!):

Frankly, it’s mind-bending stuff, and refreshing…. I haven’t read the previous two Logic books by Marks so this was like a flashback to my childhood. Interestingly, while there was some character history that I missed, from what I’ve seen of Marks’ writing style, I didn’t necessarily miss much explanation anyways. The world is presented as-is, and of course all the people in it know what is going on and why. I found the book quite intriguing, since Marks does have some unusual magic going on, and there’s certainly no overkill in the infodump department.
—James Schellenberg, The Cultural Gutter

* How gifts from the past, often unknown or unacknowledged, bless future generations; how things that look like disasters or mistakes may be parts of a much bigger pattern that produces greater, farther-reaching good results—such is the theme of Marks’ sweeping fantasy, which reaches its third volume with this successor to Fire Logic (2002) and Earth Logic (2004).
Booklist (Starred Review)



Water Logic

Fri 25 May 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Marks, Water LogicAlmost in time for WisCon (and in fact from there), we’ve got a page up for Laurie J. Marks, whose third Elemental Logic novel, Water Logic, comes out in one week.You can read an excerpt of the book on Laurie’s site — which has just had an amazing update so there are now interviews, pages on the series, a map, and there will even be a song!Last night at the author reception (at one of our favorite indie bookstores A Room of One’s Own) Laurie read one of the folk tales from Earth Logic (the second book, afer Fire Logic).Later in the convention Laurie will be doing another reading, that song mentioned above will be performed (by Rosemary Kirstein), Laurie and fellow Guest of Honor Kelly Link will interview one another, there will be desserts, some speechifying, more possibly-fascinating panels than you and your clone army can attend, and a Water Logic book release party held in the local acquarium.In the meantime PW reviewed the book:

“Marks plays the fantasy       of her unfolding epic more subtly here than in previous volumes, and       the resulting depiction of intransigent cultures in conflict, rich       with insight into human nature and motives, will resonate for modern       readers.”—Publishers Weekly

After WisCon, we’ll be off to BookExpo, where there will be copies of this book (and some of our others) available, then a couple of weeks later we’ll be at ALA for the first time (hello…!)—but more on that later.And somewhere in between there we should do a giveaway of this awesome book (or maybe a package of all 3 in the series) but we will need to come up with ideas of how and why to give the books away.Off to load books into a book room and see if the Tiptree Bake Sale is open today or if we have to wait until tomorrow.



Laurie Marks

Thu 10 May 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Marks, Water LogicPodcast Thusday. Which we will keep to when we have stuff. Mostly.

This week: not Alan DeNiro! (Although he will have an interview posted on the LBC sometime this week.)

Laurie J. Marks has recorded the first chapter of her fabby new novel Water Logic. You can go ahead and read it or listen to it in 2 parts: one, two.

We love this book. It’s the first fantasy series we’ve ever been a part of publishing and we’re very happy to say that the first and second books are available as mass market paperbacks. Haven’t read them? Read or listen to the start of each:

  1. Fire Logic: read · listen one, two.
  2. Earth Logic: read · listen.