Wed 1 Aug 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 5 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

The conversation about What the Hell is Interstitial? and Maybe It’s Everything? and Hey, This Book is Ok! rolls on with a recent review at Strange Horizons (“each “interfiction” shares this sense of disjointed narrative, but in very different ways that do not lend themselves to easy genre categorization”) and today on Bookslut.

The latter characterizes Small Beer as seeking “to provide a definition for the genre of interstitial fiction.” Nope. In no way are we into defining things (except on the very satisfying good chocolate/great chocolate scale) or taking a shot at writing definitions. We leave that to the editors, the IAF, and John Clute et al. All we did was get in the editors’ ways and try and push the book out there. Which is right there at the end of the review:

The concluding interview with editors Sherman and Goss provides further insight into how these specific stories were chosen and the overall plan the editors had for the book. I found a similar sense of adventure in all the writing found within Interfictions and certainly enjoyed exploring the ideas and formats put forth by these exciting authors. There is much here to delight and confound readers of any age. Seek it out for the bedside table and decide for yourself just how successful these experiments in fiction truly are.

The new ish of Bookslut also has an interview with Matt Ruff by our pal Geoffrey Goodwin and a good review of Kelley Eskridge’s collection, Dangerous Space. And a ton of other stuff, you know.

More blog reviews due soon from those happy/unhappy readers who received free copies from the Interfictions giveaway.



Wed 1 Aug 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The conversation about What the Hell is Interstitial? and Maybe It’s Everything? and Hey, This Book is Ok! rolls on with a recent review at Strange Horizons (“each “interfiction” shares this sense of disjointed narrative, but in very different ways that do not lend themselves to easy genre categorization”) and today on Bookslut.

The latter characterizes Small Beer as seeking “to provide a definition for the genre of interstitial fiction.” Nope. In no way are we into defining things (except on the very satisfying good chocolate/great chocolate scale) or taking a shot at writing definitions. We leave that to the editors, the IAF, and John Clute et al. All we did was get in the editors’ ways and try and push the book out there. Which is right there at the end of the review:

The concluding interview with editors Sherman and Goss provides further insight into how these specific stories were chosen and the overall plan the editors had for the book. I found a similar sense of adventure in all the writing found within Interfictions and certainly enjoyed exploring the ideas and formats put forth by these exciting authors. There is much here to delight and confound readers of any age. Seek it out for the bedside table and decide for yourself just how successful these experiments in fiction truly are.

The new ish of Bookslut also has an interview with Matt Ruff by our pal Geoffrey Goodwin and a good review of Kelley Eskridge’s collection, Dangerous Space. And a ton of other stuff, you know.

More blog reviews due soon from those happy/unhappy readers who received free copies from the Interfictions giveaway.



Rachel Pollack

Fri 20 Jul 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Mythic Passages: the Magazine of Imagination has posted Rachel Pollack’s story “Burning Beard: The Dreams and Visions of Joseph ben Jacob, Lord Viceroy of Egypt” along with an introduction by Delia Sherman.

Recent Interfictions reviews include a conversation starter on PopMatters.



InterHipsterFictionBookClub

Tue 1 May 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The Interfictions giveaway yesterday was phenomenally fast and the copies will go out (to the UK, USA, Malaysia, and the Netherlands!) soonest.

In the meantime there’s a review of the book by Marie Mundaca up at the Hipster Book Club.



Interfictions Giveaway

Mon 30 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 21 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

InterfictionsToday is Publication Day for the Interstitial Arts Foundation’s first anthology Interfictions.

It’s out there in stores (even if the final cover hasn’t fully percolated through the digital update filters yet), being reviewed a story at a time by contributor(!) Michael DeLuca, and has its own blog.

To celebrate we have are giving away 2 things:

  • a space in between
  • and, a couple of copies of the anthology

5 individual copies of the anthology will be sent to readers anywhere in the world (some may be sent slower than others) who will do at least one of the following things:

  • Reply quite fast to this post
  • Review the book online or in print
  • Interview any of the contributors
  • Point us (in the comments) towards art they find interstitial.

Best of luck!


Flashback: here are a couple of pieces that the editors wrote before they put the antho together—

An Introduction to Interstitial Arts: Life on the Border
by Delia Sherman

Book01 by Mark WagnerBorders are interesting places. As debatable land, sometimes wasteland or wilderness, they can be dangerous places to visit or live in, but they are never boring. Even when a long period of peace and stability removes some of their dangerous glamour, they’re still (literally) edgy, different in essential ways from the countries they mediate.

Crossing Borders, by Night
Theodora Goss

When I was a child, I traveled with my grandmother across the border between Hungary and Czechoslovakia. In those days, all the borders behind the Iron Curtain were closed. As we approached the border, a guard came into our train compartment to check our travel papers and search our luggage. He also searched my grandmother’s purse, spilling its contents into her lap, feeling the lining.



Between shelves

Sat 27 Jan 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 6 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

Interfictions, the first book from the Interstitial Arts Foundation, has just gone off to the printer. A few review copies have gone out but most will go out closer to the pub date — let’s call the pub date Monday, April 30th. By then the book will be in the stores, sliding between shelves, cracking open heads, and warming the hearts of readers everywhere in Bookland.

Want to review it? Drop us a line.

The cover (featuring a photo of 3D art by Connie Toebe) is below as well as the full table of contents — although that’s still alphabetical, the true order will be revealed Later.

You can read a version of the introduction online but for the rest you’ll have to wait a bit. The Afterword, by hard-working editors Delia Sherman and Theodora Goss, is a great conversation on expectations, editing, definitions (and the lack or use of them), and should be kickstart further conversations of interest. Maybe that can be posted in the form of blog posts by the editors or maybe it will end up on the IAF forums.

A page for the book will appear soon(ish), it can be preordered here (or at your fave book shop), and it will be pretty.
http://lcrw.net/images/covers/IAF-200-72.gif

Heinz Insu Fenkl, Introduction
Karen Jordan Allen, “Alternate Anxieties”
Christopher Barzak, “What We Know About the Lost Families of – House”
K. Tempest Bradford, “Black Feather”
Matthew Cheney, “A Map of the Everywhere”
Michael DeLuca, “The Utter Proximity of God”
Adrián Ferrero, “When It Rains, You’d Better Get Out of Ulga” (translated from Spanish)
Colin Greenland, “Timothy”
Csilla Kleinheincz, “A Drop of Raspberry” (translated from Hungarian)
Holly Phillips, “Queen of the Butterfly Kingdom”
Rachel Pollack, “Burning Beard – The Dreams and Visions of Joseph Ben Jacob, Lord Viceroy of Egypt”
Joy Marchand, “Pallas at Noon”
Anna Tambour, “The Shoe in SHOES’ Window”
Veronica Schanoes, “Rats”
Léa Silhol, “Emblemata” (translated from French)
Jon Singer, “Willow Pattern”
Vandana Singh, “Hunger”
Mikal Trimm, “Climbing Redemption Mountain”
Catherynne Valente, “A Dirge for Prester John”
Leslie What, “Post hoc”
Delia Sherman and Theodora Goss, “Afterword: The Space Between”



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