On Carol Emshwiller (from 2007, and belatedly celebrating her 92nd birthday!)

Wed 24 Apr 2013 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Darn! I meant to post this to in celebrate Carol’s 92nd birthday earlier on April 12th. Ach! Well hell, here’s for celebrating Carol any time or any where.

Written for the 2007 World Fantasy Convention:

Working with Carol Emshwiller is one of the most unexpected and wonderful benefits of the foolishness that is our dance through the world of independent publishing.

Carol is everything that I could hope author to be: brilliant, hard working, gracious, polite, deeply knowledgeable and informed within and without her field, determined, willing to compromise, absolutely single-minded, intelligent, a teacher, and always open to learning. She is an inspiration—not only for her writing, in which she takes on the most trenchant problems of the day in politics, gender (and genre) relationships, and the ambiguities of everyday life—but also in her uncompromising dedication to others. For many years she has taught and taken part in workshops where she has shown her generosity and ability to see other writers’ visions of their stories. All the while, her own enthusiasm and commitment to writing burn ever brighter. Her latest novel, The Secret City, is a beautiful play on many of her favorite themes: innocence, how to live—alone or with others, and the simple and complex difficulties of communication.

These are salad days for fans of Carol’s work. In the last five years she has published three novels, The Mount (2002), Mister Boots (2005), and The Secret City (2007), as well as two collections, Report to the Men’s Club and Other Stories (2002) and I Live with You (2005). And in that time she has been awarded the Philip K. Dick Award for The Mount, two Nebula Awards for short stories, “Creature” and “I Live with You” (both F&SF, 2002 and 2006), and a World Fantasy Life Achievement Award.

In other words: if you like science fiction and fantasy and you haven’t read her, perhaps now is the time?

Carol hasn’t been resting on her laurels. Her most recent publication (that I know of, she’s hard to keep track of) is “At Sixes and Sevens” in the October/November Asimov’s. She says she is too impatient to send stories out to magazine with long reading times, so I feel we are very lucky to have one of her stories, “Sanctuary,” for LCRW.

This covers only Carol’s recent years. I first remember reading her work when I read a Women’s Press edition of Carmen Dog in the UK and by the time I met her in the 1990s in New York, she was already in her seventies. (And she is still more energetic than most people I know.)

Other writers and friends will need to fill in her earlier years. I am very happy to have spent some time with Carol (although as yet I have not gone hill climbing with her!) and I hope that everyone who attends this convention will be able to spend at least a couple of minutes with her.



Travel, updates

Tue 7 Feb 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Kelly and I (and our daughter, Ursula) will (fingers crossed) be in Australia and New Zealand from Feb. 8th to March 17th, followed by a trip to Orlando for ICFA (itinerary below the cut). There will be people in the office (Geoff! Dusty! Julie! Jenny! Even Michael!) one or two days a week but shipping will slow down and reading and responding to manuscripts will slow to a halt. Submit work elsewhere or be ready to wait a long time (sorry about that) if you send it our way.

I’m more sad than I can say after hearing that two very different writers I loved have died, John Cristopher and Wislawa Szymborska. I loved John Christopher’s Tripods and Prince in Waiting/Sword of the Spirits books—read in Argyll in the early 1980s, so running away into the mountains or across the moors seemed both possible and desirable. I had no idea he had so many pseudonyms! Then when I worked at Avenue Victor Hugo Bookshop in the mid-90s and met Kelly I think she introduced me to Wislawa Szymborska’s poetry—and then Szymborska received the Nobel Prize (so we sold a lot of her books, yay!). She was so down to earth, so much fun, she was an anecdote to flat writing and a real reminder to enjoy life. She obviously did and I’m glad we have so much of her poetry.

More internety things: Members of the Carol Emshwiller Appreciation Society (me!) are happy to note that Carmen Dog is on this Geekdad/Wired list of books for your ereader.

Maureen McHugh’s After the Apocalypse has a great review by Chris Moriarty in the upcoming issue of F&SF as well as in SF Revu. From now on we will get Maureen to title all our books. Or maybe we will get her to write more stories! One of her stories, “Useless Things” is reprinted in the new issue of Apex Magazine – which also features a story from David J. Schwartz, so yay for that.

It was excellent to see io9 pick up on Nisi Shawl’s Seattle Times lovely review of Three Messages and a Warning. Eduardo and Chris did such a great job with that book! They both had events in their hometowns—San Antonio and Austin, respectively—and from all accounts, a lot of fun was had—and books were sold, so yay for spreading around more weird lit from far away places.

Over on Weightless, Three Messages is doing nicely. Which is a smooooth segue into mentioning that we are excited about adding Locus subscriptions and individual issues to the site today.

What else? Two excellent interviews with Delia Sherman went up this week: the first on SF Signal, the second on the Potomac Review. Now we need to concentrate on New Orleans and get them to choose the book for their One City program or something. (Do they have one of those? And if so, have they done Poppy Brite’s Liquor yet? Hmm?)

Read more



Carol @ Strange Horizons

Tue 31 May 2011 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

This week at Strange Horizons (copied wholesale because it is fantastic):

[Reviews posted three times a week]ARTICLE: Perfectly Herself: A discussion of the work of Carol Emshwiller, by Ursula K. Le Guin, Helen Merrick, Pat Murphy, and Gary K. Wolfe

After a career of many phases, she’s found a comfortable way to synthesize all of them, making her all over again the proverbial writer to watch. I don’t know if there’s another 90 year old author anywhere about whom that could be said.

COLUMN: The Emshwillerians, by Karen Joy Fowler

Recently I’ve begun to notice elements, techniques, and viewpoints from Carol’s writing in more places than my own stories. For decades, Carol has primarily been published as a science fiction writer. My impression is that, while always admired and often beloved, her work was seen as essentially idiosyncratic. Whatever it was she was doing, she was doing it alone, and off in her own brilliant little corner of the field. She is the sort of writer to whom the word “quirky” is applied. “A writer’s writer.” “A cult favorite.”

FICTION: Introduction to After All, by Gavin J. Grant

Introduction to this week’s reprinted story.

FICTION: After All, by Carol Emshwiller

I was thinking to write a story about somebody who needs to change (the best sort of character to write about), and all of a sudden I knew it was me who had to change. Always had been, and I didn’t realize it until that very minute. So I have to be the one to go on a journey, either of discovery or in order to avoid myself.

POETRY: Waking the Red Guardian, by WC Roberts

tendrils of fiber optics from torn sheet metal / dripping visions of worlds to come

REVIEW: This Week’s Reviews, posted three times a week

Monday: The Collected Stories of Carol Emshwiller, Volume 1, reviewed by L. Timmel Duchamp
Wednesday: Carmen Dog by Carol Emshwiller, reviewed by Paul Kincaid
Friday: Ledoyt and Leaping Man Hill by Carol Emshwiller, reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller



Random start to the week

Mon 14 Dec 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | 2 Comments| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Thanks to everyone who blogged and tweeted and got the word out on our sale, it continues apace. The Mike FM radiothon raised $93,700 for Franciscan, which is just amazing. Yay and yay and yay!

And, nice segue, there’s a good review of Interfictions 2 here from King Rat, who, awesomely, donated the cost of the book to Franciscan Hospital for Children. Another review. And David Soyka @ Black Gate.

List-lovers, here’s a good one: io9.com included Carol Emshwiller’s novel The Mount in their 20 Best Science Fiction Books of the Decade. It’s another interesting list (of sf+f) and of course works as a great conversation starter. The Mount received the Philip K. Dick Award and is indeed a

deceptively simple story about humans revolting against a group of alien conquerers who love humanity – as pets they can ride on.

Hound is 20% off at RiverRun and so are all of their Forty Favorite Books of 2009—great list of books; we advise stocking up.

Nancy Pearl always has some good reading recommendations.

Rain Taxi are having their annual auction which is always good for a pressie … or maybe something for yourself.

Kaleidotrope subscriptions are on sale—grab one before Fred changes his mind!

io9 links to the must have squid + owl.



Carmen Dog in Japan

Wed 27 May 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

In all the excitement of the new year (cough), we forgot to point our Japanese readers to Carol Emshwiller’s novel Carmen Dog which came out recently from those magnificent people at Hayakawa.

That cover is just genius. We haven’t seen copies of it yet — they are usually shipped by slow boat, literally, but when we do, give it 4-5 more months and we’ll post pics up here.

http://bookweb.kinokuniya.co.jp/imgdata/large/4309205100.jpg



Man with good taste posts about

Mon 11 May 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Carol Emshwiller. Yeah!

Short Story Month – Guest Post – Richard Grayson

SSMlogo I’d like to put in a good word for Carol Emshwiller’s wonderful short stories.  Her 1974 collection, Joy in Our Cause, published by Harper & Row, was one that influenced me a great deal.  I guess the stories could be classified as experimental, but they are all playful as well as profound.



Ed Emshwiller on YouTube

Thu 12 Feb 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Sunstone:



Bookshow follow up: 3 (of 3) [for now]

Mon 22 Sep 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Let the product do the talkingThe Brooklyn Book Festical was 1) great 2) too damn hot. In fact we’re not entirely sure we were there, it was so hot nothing quite made sense. We did catch up with innumerable friends and one of the fun things was that a certain trio of writers, Dan Braum, Nick Kaufmann, and Ben Maulbeck, kept arriving, disappearing, arriving, kvetching, disappearing, arriving (with cold drinks—saviors!), and so on.

Of course, anyone who hangs around a booth for too long is going to have to: sell books!

We sold some books, gave away button-and-tattoo sets that go with Pretty Monsters, Couch postcards, and got Vietnamese sandwiches for lunch (so that’s why people live in cities!) and at some point a reader was admiring the cover of Carol Emshwiller’s The Mount when Shelley Jackson came by and we asked her to sign the book. Shocked (hence the blinkage), Shelley obliged in a noble manner.

Shelley signingOn linking to The Mount on Powell’s, we find an irresistible urge to send people there to read the one review “ech1969″ has written one review—it’s a corker!



Carol: such hard good sentences. (and)

Wed 2 Apr 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats loves Black Sabbath (but who doesn’t) and has a book out on them soon. Interviewed on io9, he showed amazing good taste:

When I was a kid I pretty much worshiped Harlan Ellison and I still think he’s a good writer. Through his interviews & his introductions in the Dangerous Visions books I got into James Sallis & Carol Emshwiller, and I’m still a big Emshwiller fan to this day — she writes such hard good sentences.

Maybe he’s the reason The Mount has been selling so much recently?

———–

Update: Missed this until the kind people at The Stranger mailed us a real, paper copy. (We love paper, so there internets!) This was from Paul Constant’s Constant Reader column where he wrote a lovely piece about why people should go to Norwescon:

The best reason to pay attention to Norwescon is the Philip K. Dick Awards, an annual ceremony dedicated to celebrating a “distinguished original science-fiction paperback published for the first time during the award year in the USA.” Unlike most book awards, the PKD Awards almost always single out an excellent book. Of the last five years’ worth of PKD winners, three of them—Life by Gwyneth Jones, Altered Carbon by Richard Morgan, and The Mount by Carol Emshwiller—are books that, in a world unprejudiced to genre, would wind up on almost any critics’ annual best-of lists.

The Mount, particularly, is a marvel; originally published by a tiny Massachusetts art-house publisher, this novel—about a distant future wherein humans are content to be the transport animals (complete with bits and saddles) for tiny aliens who have enslaved us—is so refreshingly weird and allegorical that it evokes some of the earliest masters of the genre, like Orwell and Verne. If the PKD awards didn’t recognize The Mount, it’s doubtful that anyone else would have, either, which means that they’re possibly the only book awards in the world that actually do exactly what they’re supposed to do. recommended



Emshwiller hits the Top 20

Wed 5 Mar 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Apropos of the next item, we just bought a hilarious, poignant, excellent story by Carol Emshwiller for the next issue of LCRW. She’s getting to be a regular. We’ve had stories by her in LCRW 8, 19, 21, and even in Trampoline.

Last week the io9 blog picked a list of

The Twenty Science Fiction Novels that Will Change Your Life

which so far has been seen 93,718 times. And one of those novels (which was a pretty good list as lists go) was

The MountThe Mount (2002), by Carol Emshwiller
After human civilization is destroyed by a group of invading aliens, the survivors become the ponies of their new alien overlords. Generations later, our hero is a happy mount to the alien prince, but slowly begins to realize that the life of a pampered pet is not all he wants.

That’s right! It will change your life! Changed ours. Won an award, went back to press, sold some books, sold mass market paperback rights to Penguin, sold to Spain and some other countries. And, oh yes, it is awesome.

More about The Mount:

More about Carol:

  • Carmen Dog, Chapter 1.
  • Mrs. Jones” from Report to the Men’s Club and Other Stories
  • A letter to Carol Emshwiller from James Tiptree, Jr. (Alice Sheldon) written in 1975. You can see a scanned version of the letter here or read the letter here.


Carol Emshwiller reading and Albany-Schnctady-Troy, NY

Wed 16 Jan 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

The MountCan someone in the Albany-Schnctady-Troy region of New York explain to us what’s up with the (very nice!) bump in sales of Carol Emshwiller’s The Mount?

We’re very happy and are wondering if a local bookshop has it as a staff pick,or if the whole city is reading it, or it has been assigned to a class or it’s some kind of cruel trick or . . . something?

Also: Carol will be reading in New York City next month:

Wed., Feb 13, 8-10 PM
Carol Emshwiller, Ellen Kushner, Delia Sherman, Veronica Schanoes
Think Coffee, Cup & Pen Presents Small Beer Press
248 Mercer Street
(between 3rd and 4th streets)
New York, NY
(212) 228-6226

Here’s the most recent sales figures for the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY region:

This week: 21
Last week: 14
2 weeks ago: 15
3 weeks ago: 0
4 weeks ago: 15
5 weeks ago: 9
6 weeks ago: 9
8 weeks ago: 6
9 weeks ago: 7
10 weeks ago: 4
11 weeks ago: 0
12 weeks ago: 7



New LCRW

Tue 30 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

The image “http://lcrw.net/images/lcrwcovers/lcrw21-200.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.The new LCRW is at the printer—so we should have it (fingers stiff from still being crossed) in Saratoga. In the table of contents there are names familiar and surprising (as per).

In fiction we have stories from authors new (to us) such as Adam Ares, Alice Sola Kim (whose story “The Mom Walk” is also fantastic) the Stephanie Brady Tharpe (first publication!), the redoubtable Garbo (aka Matt Cheney), Corie Ralston, Benjamin Parzybok, and Kirstin Allio (whose novel Garner appropriately garnered much praise).

Returning to us are Jeanette Westwood (LCRW 18), Brian Conn (LCRW 10), and Carol Emshwiller (LCRW 8, 19)—who will be a guest of honor this coming weekend at the World Fantasy Convention in Saratoga Springs and who we think is completely fabby.

We only have one poet (again, new to us) this time, Lauren Bartel. Happily Dear Aunt Gwenda is back and we have a short piece from the World Sci Fi Convention in Japan. We twisted Abby Denson’s arm until she sent us a comic with cats and dolls and we have Suzanne Baumann’s tiny drawings all through.

The cover is by the fantastic Tatsuro Kiuchi.

There is a lack of zine reviews, so maybe they will appear on the site later.

We updated the subscription page for this issue and added the Google Map of LCRW stores (so few! won’t your store carry this zine?) to the main LCRW page.

And as an aside, you can order it (and now The Best of LCRW as well as many other things) here.

LCRW 21 should be mailing out to authors, artists, poets, subscribers, shops, shoppes, and preorderers, in the first week of November. Chocolate is actually here ahead of time and if it isn’t eaten first will be in your happy hands within 2 weeks. Or so. You know mailing on time is our weakness.

Fiction
Alice Sola Kim, The Night and Day War
Adam Ares, The Curmudgeon
Matthew Cheney, The Lake
Stephanie Brady Tharpe, On a Dark and Featureless Plain
Jeannette Westwood, Two Variations
Kirstin Allio, Clay
Brian Conn, The Postern Gate
Benjamin Parzybok, The Coder
Corie Ralston, Maps to God
Carol Emshwiller, Sanctuary

Poetry
Lauren Bartel, Two Poems

Nonfiction
Gwenda Bond, Dear Aunt Gwenda
Mamoru Masuda, A Primer on New Wave and Speculative Fiction in Japan

Comics
Suzanne Baumann, The Blokes of Ball Point
Abby Denson, The Mysterious Mr. M.

Cover
Tatsuro Kiuchi



Mon 26 Mar 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Last Wednesday some of us here trundled down the glorious winter roads to New York to the KGB Bar to see Carol Emshwiller and David Louis Edelman read. Both readers were worth getting the matched pair out and the (somewhat long) curricle ride. And is there anything more beautiful than the rural fields of Stamford and the rolling hills of New Haven on the approach to the glittering metropolis of New York?

However, despite the lovely readings and the feast following the reading, we left with something unexpected: a “Devil Bug of Doom” (copyright Gwenda Bond) which had us shaking like Elvis for a couple of days. Or maybe just Shakin’ Stevens.

Things You the Reader Could Do*:

Send us the new Adobe Creative Suite…? MacRumors says the pricing will be released tomorrow — which is far enough ahead of the software packages’ ship dates (which run April to June) for us to get over the sticker shock. We are using new (for us, maybe 6 months old now) MacBooks (tiny, cute computers!) and PhotoShop and InDesign run a bit slow so these upgrades are much anticipated. The Design package is what we’re looking at:

CS3 Design Premium (up) $1799.95
CS3 Design Standard $1199.95

…although we might be able to get an upgrade from PhotoShop 7 for only $900. So, Johnny, you know how we promised to take you to DissMeLand for your birthday this year? Small Beer says, Sorry Kid, maybe next year, maybe never. Don’t cry kid. Aw.

* If you were perhaps either stuck in traffic for 36 hours and bored out your head. Or just a little more than tipsy. Or a crazy stalker**. Or just wealthy. Or just plain crazy.

** We don’t have any of these, yay!

In other news:

  • John Crowley’s Endless Things received one of its first big reviews in Book Forum: “With Endless Things and the completion of the Ægypt cycle, Crowley has constructed one of the finest, most welcoming tales contemporary fiction has to offer us.”
  • Liz Hand (whose novel is will shipped from the printer next week) is part of a new group blog, the inferior 4 +1.
  • Matt Cheney posted the contents for the first Best American Fantasy anthology which includes Kelly’s “Origin Story” from A Public Space, Liz Hand’s “The Saffron Gatherer”, as well as a ton of other great stories.
  • Happy to see that Michael Dirda’s Washington Post piece was run by the Austin American Stateman this weekend.
  • Did Scotland actually win at football? Reports say the final score in some kind of European tourney was Scotland 2, Georgia 1. But we were in Georgia recently, in Atlanta, and while the accents were strong, they did not seem to be Europeans (and I could have sworn we drove, so how did we cross the water?). Scotland play Italy on Wednesday. You never know. Unless you’re a Scotland fan.


Mon 26 Mar 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , , , | 4 Comments| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Last Wednesday some of us here trundled down the glorious winter roads to New York to the KGB Bar to see Carol Emshwiller and David Louis Edelman read. Both readers were worth getting the matched pair out and the (somewhat long) curricle ride. And is there anything more beautiful than the rural fields of Stamford and the rolling hills of New Haven on the approach to the glittering metropolis of New York?

However, despite the lovely readings and the feast following the reading, we left with something unexpected: a “Devil Bug of Doom” (copyright Gwenda Bond) which had us shaking like Elvis for a couple of days. Or maybe just Shakin’ Stevens.

Things You the Reader Could Do*:

Send us the new Adobe Creative Suite…? MacRumors says the pricing will be released tomorrow — which is far enough ahead of the software packages’ ship dates (which run April to June) for us to get over the sticker shock. We are using new (for us, maybe 6 months old now) MacBooks (tiny, cute computers!) and PhotoShop and InDesign run a bit slow so these upgrades are much anticipated. The Design package is what we’re looking at:

CS3 Design Premium (up) $1799.95
CS3 Design Standard $1199.95

…although we might be able to get an upgrade from PhotoShop 7 for only $900. So, Johnny, you know how we promised to take you to DissMeLand for your birthday this year? Small Beer says, Sorry Kid, maybe next year, maybe never. Don’t cry kid. Aw.

* If you were perhaps either stuck in traffic for 36 hours and bored out your head. Or just a little more than tipsy. Or a crazy stalker**. Or just wealthy. Or just plain crazy.

** We don’t have any of these, yay!

In other news:

  • John Crowley’s Endless Things received one of its first big reviews in Book Forum: “With Endless Things and the completion of the Ægypt cycle, Crowley has constructed one of the finest, most welcoming tales contemporary fiction has to offer us.”
  • Liz Hand (whose novel is will shipped from the printer next week) is part of a new group blog, the inferior 4 +1.
  • Matt Cheney posted the contents for the first Best American Fantasy anthology which includes Kelly’s “Origin Story” from A Public Space, Liz Hand’s “The Saffron Gatherer”, as well as a ton of other great stories.
  • Happy to see that Michael Dirda’s Washington Post piece was run by the Austin American Stateman this weekend.
  • Did Scotland actually win at football? Reports say the final score in some kind of European tourney was Scotland 2, Georgia 1. But we were in Georgia recently, in Atlanta, and while the accents were strong, they did not seem to be Europeans (and I could have sworn we drove, so how did we cross the water?). Scotland play Italy on Wednesday. You never know. Unless you’re a Scotland fan.


Carmen Dog at last

Wed 21 Feb 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

http://lcrw.net/images/fries-carmen-dog.jpgThis was a picture we didn’t even realize we were waiting for until it arrived. Carol Emshwiller just forwarded us this pic that her brother, Bob Fries, took of his Newfoundland “puppy”. The puppy (surely named Carmen?) is only six months old but already huge . . . but it’s ok, the Met will feed her well when she gets that part in Carmen.



Text Edit, energy, stickers.

Tue 19 Sep 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

For anyone fed up with how slow Word can be, Jed Berry pointed us to this handy text editor: a modified version of TextEdit. Get the Ogre Kit extras too, set the preferences, and off we go.

Futurismic points to good energy news:

Since 2000, global wind energy generation has more than tripled; solar cell production has risen six-fold; production of fuel ethanol from crops have more than doubled; and biodiesel production has expanded nearly four-fold. Annual global investment in “new” renewable energy has risen almost six-fold since 1995, with cumulative investment over this period nearly $180 billion.

Cafe Press updates (very irregular):



James Tiptree. Jr.’s letter to Carol Emshwiller

Mon 11 Sep 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Recently we got the chance (you know, dark alleys, anonymous meetings in bars, dead letter boxes, the usual routine) to buy a letter to Carol Emshwiller from James Tiptree. Jr., aka Alice Sheldon (whose bio, by Julie Phillips, is burning up the book charts). Carol never replied but she kept writing and now has quite a few books out, including The Mount, Report to the Men’s Club, and Carmen Dog.

It’s a fantastic letter: over-the-top, enthusiastic, coffee-stained—although whose that is and when it happened is unknown.

We forged some ownership papers and caravaned it safely out of the country to our cold storage facility in the Arctic where it’s got a whole ice-cavern of its own.

But that didn’t seem quite right, so we’ve put up a low-resolution scan. This is how it starts:

24 May 75

Dear Carol Emshwiller:

May a stranger make known how much your book, JOY IN OUR CAUSE has been enjoyed? Weak word, meant to include admired, goggled at, occasionally genuflected to, been rivetted in entrancement by, and, not least, suffered suicidal inferiority-convictions from.

Read on



reviews, signed books

Fri 2 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Small Beer Press

Alan DeNiro news: Small Spiral Notebook review, Ideomancer interview and review of Skinny Dipping in the Lake of the Dead.

New review of Storyteller — of which we now have signed copies in stock:

“Satisfying in its own right, presenting an informative, and entertaining, blend of history, memoirs, and writing lessons.”
Steven Silver

We also have a few signed copies of our Carol Emshwiller books. (Good news there: she handed in a new novel to Jacob Weissman at Tachyon Books.)