It’s Not About the Burrito

Thu 24 Sep 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Awesome story: social media meets the burrito and Broadway Books lives.

More good book news: from now on the San Francisco Chronicle Bestseller list is the Indie Bestseller list.

We like indie bookshops, too!Buy local



Keep it green, chum

Wed 22 Jul 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 3 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

From The Regulator, another great bookshop in North Carolina:



Stop motion art hanging

Tue 16 Jun 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

at the Morris Book Shop in Lexington, KY:



widgety

Mon 15 Jun 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

IndieBound just added a list widget so that people can have multiple wish lists (one for family, one for, er, friends?).

Of course we abused it right away to make a list of Small Beer books. Actually, Small Beer Press books, will have to go back and make a small beer booklist later. Copy and paste at will.



Bugger Bugger Bugger

Tue 9 Jun 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Shaman Drum Bookshop is closing. It really is a fantastic bookshop: well designed, great choices, superb staff. Fuck.



Get your summer read on

Mon 4 May 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Benjamin Parzybok, CouchAwesome news: Couch is on the Spring/Summer 2009 Indie Next List for Reading Groups. We’ll have a reading guide for Couch up within the next few weeks and if anyone wants to contribute, you know what to do. We haven’t seen the paper version of the list yet, but we like that Couch is in #9—and that the recommendation comes from Florida, yeah! (That’s a long way for a Portland-based couch to travel….)

Other recs include a couple of Kelly’s fave books, Molly Gloss’s bestseller The Hearts of Horses and Tana French’s In the Woods, and, in the YA guide, Kelly’s collection!

9. Couch by Benjamin Parzybok
Couch follows the quirky journey of Thom, Erik, and Tree as they venture into the unknown at the behest of a magical, orange couch, which has its own plan for their previously boring lives. Parzybok’s colorful characters, striking humor, and eccentric magical realism offer up an adventuresome read.” –Christian Crider, Inkwood Books, Tampa, FL

The Hearts of Horses by Molly Gloss
(Mariner Books, $13.95,  / 0547085753)
“Molly Gloss tells a heartwarming story of a young woman who earns her way as a ‘horse gentler’ on the eastern Oregon frontier during the early 1900s.” –Sandra Palmer, Wy’east Book Shoppe & Art Gallery, Welches, OR

In the Woods: A Novel by Tana French
“This is a contemporary murder mystery set in Ireland with just the right hint of spookiness and great layers of psychological suspense, as a pair of detectives seek to solve the murder of a young girl in an ancient stand of woods. The current murder is foreshadowed by a crime against three young children many years ago that may hold a key to the new mystery.” –Sandra Palmer, Wy’east Book Shoppe & Art Gallery, Welches, OR

And here are some suggestions of great titles for reading groups of younger readers…

The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume II: The Kingdom on the Waves by M.T. Anderson

Chains by Laurie Halse AndersonThe Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Pretty Monsters: Stories by Kelly Link, Shaun Tan (illus.)



#amazonfail

Tue 14 Apr 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Pity we missed the latest Amazon debacle due to chocolate consumption and losing a couple of days to a cold. Whether it was a cataloging error, hack, or whatever, it sure did make (heads up for a late Easter reference) keeping all one’s eggs in one basket sound like a bad idea.

Perhaps readers might take note that Amazon’s annual sales are over $10 billion and that books are only a small part of that total, which make Amazon more of a Wal-Mart than a bookshop. And we know what Wal-Mart wants to do to your town: rip out its heart and make you drive out to the periphery to buy cheap stuff made abroad in factories where people are paid pennies.

Women & Children FirstHappily Indiebound is easier to use than it used to be (we just ordered a couple of books from there which went out through one of our fave bookshops in Chicago, Women & Children First) so we 100% encourage everyone to keep a multitude of voices alive and Shop Local!



Pretty

Fri 27 Mar 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Look: Indiebound gets on the crafty/etsy/pretty bus! Local bookshops celebrate spring, yay! (Now if they could only help our snowdrops come up, that would be excellent.)



On memory

Fri 20 Feb 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

When we asked Vincent McCaffrey for a bio (since we’re publishing his book in September, it seemed the polite thing to do), this is one of the variations he sent:

“I have conveniently forgotten everything I did before I started my bookshop. This allows me to make things up as need be. A writer’s prerogative, according to Mark Twain, who should know. My first professional memory is selling a book on the morning of October 15th, 1975. It felt good so I kept doing it, just like any baby-boomer would.”



Kindle King

Tue 10 Feb 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The news that Stephen King has an exclusive story for the Kindle is 1) not surprising: the man cannot resist a new channel and 2) depressing as all get out. His poor core fans. If they don’t have a $359 object they can’t read it. Wonder exactly how fast it will be 1) torrented and 2) in print.

When did Amazon acquire the One Ring? Amazon take such a huge cut that having books there is almost a loss leader ad for our books in stores. (People still like to pick up and see what they’re buying—and our books are all printed on pretty pretty recycled paper.)

When talking heads say not to worry about bookstores/chain stores/distributors dying because Amazon will save us all, I think: ok, I can find a job that will actually pay me because if it’s all Amazon all the time, this job won’t.



Want to buy a bookstore in Portland, OR?

Fri 2 Jan 2009 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

23rd Ave Books is for sale. Or it’s going to close.

Go on, it’s a beautiful city and you’ve always wanted to run your own bookshop.



wanted for the office

Fri 5 Dec 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

although 23″ x 46″ isn’t as big as we could really do with:

2160527-3-eat-sleep-read



Pandemonium tonight

Tue 25 Nov 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Tonight we’ll be in Boston with Benjamin Parzybok for his reading at 7 PM at Pandemonium Books (ok, Cambridge) then Ben will take his tour back to the west coast. So far no one on the east coast has brought a couch to a reading. Boston couch carriers, represent! (We do have some nice pics of couches, will get those online soon.)

Kelly is being interviewed by Lizzie Skurnick at the 21st Annual Indie and Small Press Fair in a couple of weeks in NYC:

Sat. Dec 6th, 5:00 PM: Author and Indie Publisher Kelly Link interviewed by Lizzie Skurnick
Kelly Link has built a serious cult following with her uncanny and affecting fiction. She flirts with fable, fantasy, and horror and stands among the best of short-story writers. After two collections, Link’s new book, Pretty Monsters, is targeted at young adults — though she hasn’t turned down her sublime strangeness one bit. Link is also the co-publisher of Small Beer Press. Lizzie Skurnick is a writer, editor, poet, and, according to Forbes.com, “one of the smartest bloggers on the Web.”

The Table of Contents for Jonathan Strahan’s The Best SF and Fantasy of the Year Vol. 3 is out and includes Joan Aiken’s “Goblin Music” from The Serial Garden, the title story of Pretty Monsters. Looks like another great book in the series.

Ben Rosenbaum interviewed on Sci Fi Wire (is there a Fantasy Wire?):

“My feeling, after reading Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, that its protagonists, the Dashwoods, have so much verve, aplomb and admirable self-control that they are a bit underchallenged by merely arranging for matrimony in Georgian England, and that if, say, they were living on the body of a colossal naked giant who was living on a fractal series of ever-larger naked giants…”

Wish Christopher Barzak’s new book a happy birthday!

Shelf Awareness had a note on Powell’s new solar array which will provide 25% of the power for their warehouse—another reason to support this amazing indie bookstore. In our town there’s a fantastic toy store, A2Z, which installed something like 40 panels to (again) provide about 25% of their power. You can see a snapshot of the power generation system every 15 minutes or so—not quite yet as it’s a bit dark and rainy here this morning.



Surprises

Thu 30 Oct 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

  • Down in Greensboro, NC, the News-Record reports on a new bookshop we’re looking forward to visiting, Glenwood Community Bookshop—check out the pic of the owner (via Shelf Awareness).
  • Great interview in the Twin Cities Daily Planet (what a great name!) with Allan Kornblum of Coffee House Press—a stand up guy who has helped us out in a jam more than once or twice.
  • If you’re wondering what to get us for Christmas (or Halloween), one of these pieces by Eva_Rønnevig would be much appreciated (via the acknowledgements in Couch!). They are just fabulous and perhaps just out of our range. Oh well.
  • William Smith, one of le fave bloggers, found “an interesting bit of NYC ephemera. This edition of Treasure Island was published by and given gratis to guests of Hotel Taft.” (We are very open to any hotels who want to do special editions of our books.)
  • Just the other day listened to Terri Windling and Howard Gayton reading at the KGB Bar in June on Veronica Schanoes’s guest hosted Hour of the Wolf. (MP3 link)
  • Very sad that the Christian Science Monitor has stopped its print edition (via everywhere). That there is a good paper that deserves a wide readership.
  • Listening to Sam Phillips in concert on NPR, how lovely.

That Sam Phillips link reminded us to go check the All Songs Considered Podcast. Up until now there was one show in the list that had been downloaded: Jenny Lewis a while ago. Today, went to iTunes, chose Refresh after making sure the Preferences were to include all the missed shows. Rather than download them all, they all came up as a choice to download: plethora of riches! Right now being downloaded: Antony and the Johnsons, Byrne & Eno (should we go see them on December 2 here?), Tilly & the Wall, Circulatory Sustems, Thom Yorke’s guest dj spot (listening to a Radiohead concert, although it’s not on the auto-download list), Dengue Fever, Iron and Wine, Robert Plant & Alison Krauss, Rilo Kiley, Bjork, and a Few More.

Jens Leckman is doing a solo show at Northampton High School on Saturday November 1 as a fundraiser to help with costs not covered for a local teenager who was hit by a drunk driver.



Harvard Book Store/Books of Wonder

Wed 22 Oct 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The former of these just called asking if we had lots of copies of Joan Aiken‘s book in stock…. Which has to be good news and is as good a time as any to mention an event we’re sending out invitations to (consider yourself served with an invitation):

The Serial GardenMichael Dirda, Lizza Aiken, and Charles Schlessinger
Celebrate Joan Aiken’s Armitage Stories

Sunday, November 16th 1-3 pm

Books of Wonder
18 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011
212-989-3270

We will celebrate the publication of The Serial Garden with a conversation between Michael Dirda and Joan Aiken‘s daughter Lizza Aiken and Joan’s lovely and esteemed long-time US literary agent, Charles Schlessiger of Brandt & Hochman.

This event is free and readers of all ages are welcome.



Some of our books not crossing into Borders

Fri 10 Oct 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Cover ImageA note to our readers who might be out there in the wilds of the world (or at least the USA) hoping to snag their copies of our books at Borders: well, some of those books just won’t be there.

As ever, the best choice is your local bookshop—they can order it fast from Consortium or Ingram—but if you’re looking for Geoff Ryman’s The King’s Last Song or Joan Aiken’s Complete Armitage Stories or to get your copy of Ben Parzybok’s Couch (one couch to rule them all!) from Borders: at the moment you are out of luck.

Borders has sold a ton of copies of some of our books, Stranger Things Happen and Perfect Circle, for example, but while the indies, A*azon, and Barnes & Noble have ordered a nice chunk of our new books’ print runs, so far Borders, as Greg Frost also found, is sitting tight, not ordering books, trying not to go bust. So, best of luck on the not going bust, might be a bit hard if they’re not actually carrying the books people are expecting to find.



Bookshow followup 2

Mon 22 Sep 2008 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Pretty Monsters: Stories CoverLast week we dropped by the NEIBA indie booksellers association trade show in Boston where Kelly signed real and actual (and so pretty!) hardcover copies of Pretty Monsters—mostly for happy booksellers and librarians. If you’re crazy, you can get one straight off of Bookfinder right now from the peeps who took the freebies, got them signed, and want to overcharge you.

However, we’ll be getting this in stock here for Kelly to sign and selling it the way we regularly sell books: regular price and free shipping.

Jedediah Berry was also there signing a huge stack of early galleys of The Manual of Detection which comes out in February from the Penguin Press. More on that as the date approaches.

One of the more exciting books to see on the floor was the first US edition of Iain Banks’s The Crow Road, which is an Indie Bound pick (which maybe means you can read it at your local coffee shop and get a high five from the barista). The Crow Road is a great big novel—we’d have published it if we’d realized it hadn’t come out here, oops! It was made into a TV series a couple of years ago but, what do you know, the book, it is better. The rec here comes from a bookshop that we used to frequent (along with Curious and Archives) whenever we were in East Lansing, MI, for Clarion, and who at one point carried LCRW, so lots of love for Schuler Books:

“This delightful and complicated novel begins, ‘It was the day my grandmother exploded,’ and just gets better from there. Weaving between two generations of family secrets, with an innocence and charm that’s rare in modern fiction, I can’t remember the last time I enjoyed a book this much!”
–Carol Schneck, Schuler Books & Music, Okemos, Mich.



LCRW map

Wed 11 Jul 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

lcrw wrestles with the future Here’s a map of the bookshops that carry LCRW. Not many! Any help appreciated and followed up in an incredibly slow manner. Hello again Google! We’ve been waiting to map this for 15 years—long before we started the zine. Maybe that’s why we started the zine? Who can remember?

Anyway. How can we take over the world with The Best of LCRW if we have fallen to this few bookshops? Remember the days you could buy LCRW at the checkout at Target? Or when Isaac Miyake designed the free zine bag gotten with a Nordstrom Level LCRW subscription?

God those were either good days or good drugs. And of course we are a drug free environment (barring naturally occurring endorphins and alcohol) here at Small Beer, so they must have have been great days.

So many non-LCRW states!

Come on shops d’books: wouldn’t you like a twice-a-year stack of stapled, no spine, b&w zines? This is the best collection of short fiction gathered in the slowest time in a zine named after an American emigrant. It’s the ultimate impulse buy… James Patterson writes for it… It’s all wonderful but ultimately tragic stories about puppies… It has a few Secrets in every issue…

What’s that? No booksellers read these pages. Darn.



Wed 18 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Linkfarming:

  • Tonight at the KGB Bar Fantastical Fiction series: Kit Reed and Jon Armstrong read from the color opera: Bronze and Grey.
  • Thursday, Kelly Link reads at the 11th annual Mad RiverLiterary Festival at Northwestern Connecticut Community College. (Magic for Beginners review from an interesting point of view.) Meanwhile a screenwriting class is working on “a STRONG ADAPTATION, not a freewheeling one” of “The Specialist’s Hat” for their final assignment. And at some point there will be tiny films based on “The Girl Detective” from a grad program. More news from Kelly soon. Besides the story “Magic for Beginners” appearing in Fiction—the French edition of F&SF.
  • Friday: Yo La Tengo play at the Academy of Music in Northampton, MA.
  • Birnbaum notices Endless Things. Does he need to read it? Oh yes.
  • A truly-worth-reading review on Rain Taxi of Skinny Dipping in the Lake of the Dead:

    DeNiro’s range and the suppleness of his voice would set him apart even minus the compassion that drives Skinny Dipping.

  • Jennifer Stevenson on the addictive and sometimes helpful madness of writing a book in a week. (Jennifer’s up to Chapter 17 in her podcast of Trash Sex Magic.)
  • Congratulations to this year’s crop of Young Lions (check out their NYC events):

Chris Adrian, The Children’s Hospital
Kevin Brockmeier, The Brief History of the Dead
Tony D’Souza, Whiteman
Olga Grushin, The Dream Life of Sukhanov
Karen Russell, St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised By Wolves

  • Sharp-eyed folks will remember Karen Russell from LCRW 15 — her story “Help Wanted” will be reprinted in this autumn’s surprise Costco Book of the Year and Costa Award Winner The Best of LCRW.
  • St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves: Stories Cover2 of Karen’s stories from her collection also appear on the Tiptree Honor List — congratulations to winners, Shelley Jackson for Half Life and Catherynne M. Valente for The Orphan’s Tales: In the Night Garden and all the honorees:

Andrea Hairston, Mindscape (Aqueduct Press 2006)
Betsy James, Listening at the Gate (Atheneum 2006)
Ellen Kushner, The Privilege of the Sword (Spectra 2006) [HC]
James Morrow, The Last Witchfinder (Morrow 2006)
Michaela Roessner, “Horse-Year Women”; (Fantasy and Science Fiction, January 2006)
Karen Russell, “Ava Wrestles the Alligator”; (Granta 93, April 2006; St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves (Knopf 2006))
Karen Russell, “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” ( Zoetrope: All-Story, Summer 2006; St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves (Knopf 2006))
Karen Traviss, Matriarch (Eos 2006)
Mark von Schlegell, Venusia (Semiotext(e) 2005)

  • Ed Park‘s novel Personal Days got pre-empted by Jonathan Cape. That’s pretty exciting news.
  • Final covers for all our books are up. Books are all either at the printer or somewhere in flight between the Moon and You.
  • Women & Children FirstDo everyone a favor and put your next book order (or three) in to Women & Children First in Chicago. This is an amazing bookshop that for huge community resource. Like many other city center bookstores it is fighting for survival due to rising rents (in part due to the increased foot traffic the bookshops bring to an area) and of course internet book sales. They sell some of our books and stock LCRW, which is amazing. But that’s not the reason it’s worth sending some of your hard-earned their way. W&CF work for the community as much as for themselves. Look at their Organization of the Month and the Women’s Voices Fund. Anyway, enough: here are some recs to get there: The Cottagers, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Ironside.
  • More TK. TBA. To come. To Be Arranged. TBS. To Be Shelved. TSPTD. To sleep, perchance to dream.
  • This space above for useless comments on recent events.


Wed 18 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Linkfarming:

  • Tonight at the KGB Bar Fantastical Fiction series: Kit Reed and Jon Armstrong read from the color opera: Bronze and Grey.
  • Thursday, Kelly Link reads at the 11th annual Mad RiverLiterary Festival at Northwestern Connecticut Community College. (Magic for Beginners review from an interesting point of view.) Meanwhile a screenwriting class is working on “a STRONG ADAPTATION, not a freewheeling one” of “The Specialist’s Hat” for their final assignment. And at some point there will be tiny films based on “The Girl Detective” from a grad program. More news from Kelly soon. Besides the story “Magic for Beginners” appearing in Fiction—the French edition of F&SF.
  • Friday: Yo La Tengo play at the Academy of Music in Northampton, MA.
  • Birnbaum notices Endless Things. Does he need to read it? Oh yes.
  • A truly-worth-reading review on Rain Taxi of Skinny Dipping in the Lake of the Dead:

    DeNiro’s range and the suppleness of his voice would set him apart even minus the compassion that drives Skinny Dipping.

  • Jennifer Stevenson on the addictive and sometimes helpful madness of writing a book in a week. (Jennifer’s up to Chapter 17 in her podcast of Trash Sex Magic.)
  • Congratulations to this year’s crop of Young Lions (check out their NYC events):

Chris Adrian, The Children’s Hospital
Kevin Brockmeier, The Brief History of the Dead
Tony D’Souza, Whiteman
Olga Grushin, The Dream Life of Sukhanov
Karen Russell, St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised By Wolves

  • Sharp-eyed folks will remember Karen Russell from LCRW 15 — her story “Help Wanted” will be reprinted in this autumn’s surprise Costco Book of the Year and Costa Award Winner The Best of LCRW.
  • St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves: Stories Cover2 of Karen’s stories from her collection also appear on the Tiptree Honor List — congratulations to winners, Shelley Jackson for Half Life and Catherynne M. Valente for The Orphan’s Tales: In the Night Garden and all the honorees:

Andrea Hairston, Mindscape (Aqueduct Press 2006)
Betsy James, Listening at the Gate (Atheneum 2006)
Ellen Kushner, The Privilege of the Sword (Spectra 2006) [HC]
James Morrow, The Last Witchfinder (Morrow 2006)
Michaela Roessner, “Horse-Year Women”; (Fantasy and Science Fiction, January 2006)
Karen Russell, “Ava Wrestles the Alligator”; (Granta 93, April 2006; St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves (Knopf 2006))
Karen Russell, “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” ( Zoetrope: All-Story, Summer 2006; St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves (Knopf 2006))
Karen Traviss, Matriarch (Eos 2006)
Mark von Schlegell, Venusia (Semiotext(e) 2005)

  • Ed Park‘s novel Personal Days got pre-empted by Jonathan Cape. That’s pretty exciting news.
  • Final covers for all our books are up. Books are all either at the printer or somewhere in flight between the Moon and You.
  • Women & Children FirstDo everyone a favor and put your next book order (or three) in to Women & Children First in Chicago. This is an amazing bookshop that for huge community resource. Like many other city center bookstores it is fighting for survival due to rising rents (in part due to the increased foot traffic the bookshops bring to an area) and of course internet book sales. They sell some of our books and stock LCRW, which is amazing. But that’s not the reason it’s worth sending some of your hard-earned their way. W&CF work for the community as much as for themselves. Look at their Organization of the Month and the Women’s Voices Fund. Anyway, enough: here are some recs to get there: The Cottagers, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Ironside.
  • More TK. TBA. To come. To Be Arranged. TBS. To Be Shelved. TSPTD. To sleep, perchance to dream.
  • This space above for useless comments on recent events.


Elliott Bay

Fri 6 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Bookshop T-shirt tour: Elliott Bay in Seattle, WA. Nice rich color, good for autumn.

There are tons of great bookshops in Seattle. Some of them probably don’t force you to turn your back to people to show off the wonder of their graphic design dept. But Elliott Bay is confident that you will. Or, that you’re a leader and people behind you will suddenly realize that they should pop off to the original E.Bay and get a book.

A book? How about something naughty and futuristic for the weekend? Such as Sex in the System: Stories of Erotic Futures, Technological Stimulation, and the Sensual Life of Machines. (That’s, er, a mouthful.) Edited by Cecilia Tan, it has stories from Sarah Micklem, Steve Berman, Jennifer Stevenson, Scott Westerfeld (reprinted from Say…), Gavin J. Grant (reprinted from Singularity a while back), at least one pseudonymous author, and an orgy of others. (“Orgy” being the collective term for erotica writers, no?) Funny cover, too. Don’t know if there are Seattle writers in this, or if there’s a Seattle event planned, but you can always go read it aloud at a park and see what happens.



home

Thu 17 Aug 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Posted by: Gavin

Home-ish. Sort of. Back in the office after a trip to Minneapolis and NYC. Photos may appear if the downloading thingy can be worked. (Unlikely anytime soon. If you would like to hold your breath until this happens, feel free. If you would like to come over and download the things: Away! To speak to a human customer service agent, please press Control-Alt(or Apple)-Delete on your keyboard.)

It had been a while since we’d been to DreamHaven Books — wow. And woe-is-me because it is so far away. Happily they send is their monthly catalog but being there is an inspiring experience. So many good books to read! (And they have copies of zines like Say… and JPPN.) Kelly read there (with Bryan, see next) on Thursday night to a standing room only crowd. We also managed to get to Wild Rumpus (a bookshop with chickens), the Wedge (a huuuge coop: local, baby, local!), and some good eateries, as well as visit the Diane Arbus exhibit at the Walker and meet the Rain Taxiers….
Diversicon is a lovely convention — readers and writers (in the Midwest especially) should go if possible. It’s sort of in the same headspace as WisCon, smaller, but smart people talking about interesting things. Bryan Thao Worra, the Special Guest, is a suave, smart poet (download a pdf chapbook, Monstro) and activist whose writing is as funny as he is. He gave a great presentation on mysterious places in Laos (so says Alan — we saw the preview). Books were sold (yay!), the Mall of America was avoided (uh huh!), and a couple of trips into the Twin Cities were made. The hotel, a Holiday Inn Select (selected for oddness?) was just weird — hear that hoteliers? we will seek revenge! Petty revenge, at that. Reservation? Nope. Uh. Help? Maybe. Buggers. Fortunately the con folks had all the info at their fingertips (even when woken after midnight (sorry Rick!) — it really did take the hotel a while to get us in a room). Who cares?

Elizabeth Bear and Bill Shunn read at KGB, fantastic fiction was read, fantastic food at Grand Sichaun was had, and loud music was sung along to on the way home.

Let’s see: Beginning. yes, did that. Middle? Sort of. End? Uh, no. Maybe next time.



Silly bugger

Mon 15 May 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Some opinionist at Slate (in an attempt to get web traffic, therefore no link) says indie or local bookshops aren’t that important. We sell a lot of books at Amazon and in the chains but Small Beer Press basically wouldn’t exist without the support of indie bookshops. Park Road Books in Charlotte, NC, has sold 50+ copies of Mockingbird. Bailey/Coy has sold 200+ copies of Stranger Things Happen. These are booksellers who will read a new writer, such as Alan DeNiro, and put his book into customers hands — not everyone, but everyone who might appreciate it. Read more



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