That’s it.

Thu 29 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The Unreal and the Real is out of stock at the distributor. If you want copies for the holidays, order them now. (Powells have plenty.)

We think they were two of the best books published this year—no matter what other lists say! Wait a couple of years and try and see. Of course we feel the same about all the books we publish (otherwise, sang the chorus, what would beeeeee the point?) so if you miss them, may we suggest:

a deep and dark collection of strange stories . . . half a dozen stories of earth and air . . . a debut collection that Adam Roberts mentioned in the Guardian . . . that Armitage family . . . a guidebook to 26 fantastic cities . . . a first of its kind anthology of contemporary Mexican stories . . . nine stories of science, aging, and imagination . . . a pageturning science fiction thriller . . . the Sykes’s children’s find their mother and she is no longer who they thought she was!

       



Tomorrow in Northampton

Thu 29 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Did I ever post this? I’m on a panel tomorrow morning at our lovely local library (handy, I can pick up the 2 books I have on hold!) with Susan Stinson—whose Northampton novel, Spider in a Tree, we will publish next year, Nancy Felton, co-owner of one of our local bookshops, Broadside (who carry LCRW, yay!), and an amazing book artist, Daniel E. Kelms. Come on by!

The State of the Book in the Digital Age

Friday November 30, 2012
10:00 AM


A CHAT WITH FOUR LOCAL BOOK PEOPLE

What’s up with books these days? Books are ordered online, created on demand, and distributed in digital form to individuals and libraries. Many bookstores have closed in recent years, and publishers have had to drastically downsize, retool or go out of business.How have individuals and businesses responded to this new environment? Are books giving a last gasp or being reinvented? An author, a book artist, a publisher and a bookstore owner will give their thoughts on the changing environment for books.

Panelists:

Susan Stinson is the author of three novels and a collection of poetry and lyric essays. Writer in Residence at Forbes Library, she is also an editor and writing coach.

Daniel E. Kelm is a book artist who enjoys expanding the concept of the book. In addition to creating his own projects he offers consultations, bindery services, and rental of his studio and equipment.

Gavin J. Grant is the publisher of Small Beer Press. He co-edits the zine Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet with his wife, Kelly Link, and runs an the independent press ebooksite, http://weightlessbooks.com, with a friend.

Nancy Felton is a co-owner of Broadside Bookshop, where she has worked since 1980 in a variety of capacities, including children’s book buyer, sales clerk and bookkeeper. She has been an active member of NEIBA (New England Independent Booksellers Association) and Pioneer Valley Local First.

Come to Forbes Library on Friday, Nov. 30 at 10 am to hear these local book lovers talk about their own experiences, and give their visions of what books might look like in the future.There will be plenty of time for questions from the audience.



The Unreal and the Real: Publication Day

Tue 27 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

It is amazing to sit here and think about these two books being out in the world. The Unreal and the Real: Selected Stories of Ursula K. Le Guin Volume One: Where on Earth and Volume Two: Outer Space, Inner Lands.

There are many people we owe thanks to for their help and patience as this rather big book came slowly into sight: Ursula K. Le Guin, of course, and her agent, Vaughne Lee Hansen of the Virginia Kidd Agency; John D. Berry for designing the covers; Tugboat Printshop for the use of their art; and Michael J. DeLuca, Julie Day, Kelly Lagor, Anne Horowitz, Julia Patt, and Georgiana Lee for last minute help.

Should you wish signed copies, you should keep an eye on Ursula’s calendar. Her next reading is at Powell’s City of Books on January 6, 2013.

Now the books are out and getting read and reviewed widely, selling like hot cakes, and generally behaving as if, yes, it is incredibly obvious that such books would be well received, it is an immense relief and a hell of a way to end the year on.

Because, besides an upcoming issue of LCRW, this (these!) is (are!) the last book(s!) from us for 2012. (Ok, ok, so we’re well into our 2013 books and buying books for 2014, what’s your point?) Whether you read these books in their lovely hardcover editions or download them as ebooks, I hope you enjoy them as much as we have.

The Unreal and the Real: Where on Earth cover - click to view full size The Unreal and the Real: Outer Space, Inner Lands cover - click to view full size



The Unreal and the Real: Where on Earth

Tue 27 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Books, Ursula K. Le Guin | 5 Comments| Posted by: intern

Selected Stories Volume One
Second Printing: January 2013
9781618730343 · trade cloth · 281pp · $24
9781618730367 · ebook · $14.95
Audio book available here from Recorded Books.
[See Volume 2 here.]

New: Now available in one volume from Simon & Schuster/Saga.
— Four Questions from Publishers Weekly

Don’t miss Ursula K. Le Guin’s acceptance speech upon receiving the 2014 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters from the National Book Foundation.
— Profiles in: Boston Globe · The Guardian · NPR · Los Angeles Times · New Yorker · Salon ·

Read the Paris Review interview.

Oregon Book Award winner.
World Fantasy and Locus award finalist.

“There is no better spirit in all of American letters than that of Ursula Le Guin,”wrote Choire Sicha in November. This two-volume collection of her masterful short stories – one book of science fiction, the other of the mundane – “guns from the grim to the ecstatic, from the State to the Garden of Eden, with just one dragon between.”
Slate Top 10 Books of the Year

“Ursula K. Le Guin is a gift to the world, to the cosmos even. Her works have inspired generations of readers to imagine the endless possibilities of the universe and our own imaginations. Nowhere is the power of Le Guin’s voice more evident than in the nearly forty stories selected for these stunning collections. The first volume includes terrestrial stories full of magical realism and satirical wit. The second volume covers the celestial and the fantastical, straying to the stars and beyond. Both volumes leave the reader in awe of Le Guin’s range and craftsmanship. A perfect addition to any library.”
—Casey Stryer The Elliott Bay Book Co.

“A century from now people will still be reading the fantasy stories of Ursula K Le Guin with joy and wonder. Five centuries from now they might ask if their author ever really existed, or if Le Guin was an identity made from the work of many writers rolled into one. A millennium on and her stories will be so familiar, like myths and fairytales today, that only dedicated scholars will ask who wrote them. Such is the fate of the truly great writers, whose stories far outlive their names.”
The Guardian

For fifty years, National Book Award winner Ursula K. Le Guin’s stories have shaped the way her readers see the world. Her work gives voice to the voiceless, hope to the outsider, and speaks truth to power. Le Guin’s writing is witty, wise, both sly and forthright; she is a master craftswoman.

This two-volume selection of almost forty stories taken from her eleven collections was made by Le Guin herself, as was the organizing principle of splitting the stories into the nominally realistic and fantastic.

Where on Earth focuses on Le Guin’s interest in realism and magic realism and includes eighteen of Le Guin’s satirical, political, and experimental earthbound stories.

Highlights include World Fantasy and Hugo Award winner “Buffalo Gals, Won’t You Come Out Tonight,” the rarely reprinted satirical short, “The Lost Children,” Jupiter Award winner, “The Diary of the Rose,” and the title story of her Pulitzer Prize finalist collection Unlocking the Air.

Stories in this volume were originally published in venues as varied as Playboy, TriQuarterly, Orbit, Redbook, and The New Yorker. 

Companion volume Outer Space Inner Lands includes Le Guin’s best known nonrealistic stories. Both volumes include new introductions by the author.

The Unreal and the Real is a much-anticipated event which will delight, amuse, and provoke.

New: Ursula K. Le Guin interviewed on The Millions.

Listen to Ursula K. Le Guin on BBC’s The World.

Robin Morgan interviews UKL, Women’ Media Center live.

Listen to an interview with Ursula K. Le Guin on the Writer’s Voice.

Read an interview with Ursula K. Le Guin on Wired.

LA Times Holiday Gift Guide.

Reviews for Simon & Schuster’s 2016 one-volume hardcover edition

“A truly majestic collection from one of our finest writers, The Unreal and the Real includes a wide range of Le Guin’s short fiction. Filled with keen observations and splendid storytelling, Le Guin’s prose is effortless and graceful, encompassing a multitude of worlds and the people who inhabit them.” — Mary J, Powell’s Books

“Le Guin’s storytelling talent and expressive language make every character’s choices feel true and significant, and all of the stories resonate with the reader.
Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Reviews

“Ursula K. Le Guin is the rare writer whose fiction is equally at home in the New Yorker or in Asimov’s Science Fiction. . . . Whether her stories are set in worlds beyond this one or in the building down the street, Le Guin is an astonishing creator and chronicler of communities, and an observer of the ways in which we interact, for good and for bad. These books serve as a fine reminder of that.”
—Tobias Carroll, Minneapolis Star Tribune

From Julie Phillips essay in Bookslut:

“In an email interview, [David Mitchell] spoke of how Le Guin could dream up a nonexistent world ‘and make it feel more real than the ‘real’ here and now around me, this Worcestershire I’m growing up in. Sometimes I think my writing life is the theory, practice and emulation of that same trick.'”
—David Mitchell

“I read her nonstop growing up and read her still. What makes her so extraordinary for me is that her commitment to the consequences of our actions, of our all too human frailties, is unflinching and almost without precedent for a writer of such human optimism. She never turns away from how flinty the heart of the world is. It gives her speculations a resonance, a gravity that few writers, mainstream or generic, can match.”
—Junot Diaz

“A lot of her work is about telling stories, and what it means to tell stories, and what stories look like. She’s been extremely influential on me in that area of what I, as a beginning writer, thought a story must look like, and the much more expansive view I have now of what a story can be and can do.”
—Karen Joy Fowler

 “I feel possible with her in the world. Too much else denies who I am or who I could imagine myself to be.”
—Andrea Hairston

“Le Guin’s science fiction, including The Lathe of Heaven and the antiwar The Word for World Is Forest, ‘helped shape my way of thinking about men and women, love and war. She was and remains a central figure for me.'”
—Michael Chabon

“What can be said about Le Guin that hasn’t already been said? She is one of the most iconic of all living writers, in or out of genre. This two-volume set provides an amazing look at the sheer depth and breadth of her short fiction—and should further add to her influence and her legacy.”
Omnivoracious: The Best Fantasy and Science Fiction Collections of 2012

“A career-spanning two-volume sampling of Ursula Le Guin’s short stories, in beautiful hardbacks, as chosen and introduced by the author herself. The stories add up to a masterclass in contemporary fiction, divided according to setting—the ones in Where On Earth all take place on some version of this planet, with Outer Space, Inner Lands visiting locations further afield. Even if, like me, you own all nine of Le Guin’s original collections, these books are too beautiful to resist.”
New Zealand HeraldBest Books of 2012

“The Unreal and the Real guns from the grim to the ecstatic, from the State to the Garden of Eden, with just one dragon between. (Every collection needs one dragon.) In every good career-spanning collection, you can observe an author growing into her authority. Here, every story, in its own way and from its own universe, told in its own mode, explains that there is no better spirit in all of American letters than that of Ursula Le Guin.”
Slate“No Better Spirit”

“Le Guin has a tendency to write in a fascinating style, a hybrid of minimalism and just slightly pretentious pithiness; when the story can support that kind of emotional payload, it’s powerful stuff.”
Nerds of a Feather

“Only ‘Buffalo Gals, Won’t You Come Out Tonight’ and ‘The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas’ are among the author’s well-known classics. On the other hand, read ‘Hand, Cup, Shell’ or ‘The Matter of Segri.’ Then consider that there may really be no such thing as minor Le Guin, particularly if one is disposed to savor a command of the English language that remains nearly unequaled in the ranks of English-language sf and fantasy. Equally good as an introduction to the author’s short fiction or to fill in gaps that may remain in larger collections.”
Booklist

“The first of a two-volume collection focuses on stories that are occasionally tinged with magic but remain primarily realistic…. This volume shows that SFWA Grand Master Le Guin can make as great a mark outside genre fiction as she did within it.”
Publishers Weekly

Table of Contents

Volume One: Where on Earth

“Introduction: Choosing and Dividing”
“Brothers and Sisters”
“A Week in the Country”
“Unlocking the Air”
“Imaginary Countries”
“The Diary of the Rose” [audio; BBC Radio 7, read by Laurel Lefkow]
“The Direction of the Road”
“The White Donkey”
“Gwilan’s Harp”
“May’s Lion”
“Buffalo Gals”
“Horse Camp”
“The Lost Children”
“The Water is Wide”
“Texts”
“Sleepwalkers”
“Hand, Cup, Shell”
“Ether, OR”
“Half Past Four

Praise for Ursula K. Le Guin’s short story collections:

“An important writer. Period.”—The Washington Post

“Witty, satirical and amusing. Yet it is the author’s more serious work that displays her talents best, as she employs recurring themes and elements—cultural diversity, unlikely heroes and heroines, power’s ability to corrupt, love’s power to guide—and considers characters and types (women, children, the differently sexed and gendered) so often disenfranchised by other, more technologically oriented SF writers. . . . [A] classy and valuable collection.”
Publishers Weekly

“Her characters are complex and haunting, and her writing is remarkable for its sinewy grace.”
Time

“Le Guin’s prose is so luminous and simple, and she always tells the truth, and when I’m with her people, I’m with living people, on worlds as solid and real as my own. Le Guin has a gift, which is to transform words into worlds.”
—Molly Gloss

“There is no writer with an imagination as forceful and delicate as Ursula Le Guin’s.”
—Grace Paley

“[Le Guin] examines the most public of politics and the most intimate of emotions, constantly challenging her readers to reconsider what it means to be human and humane.”
—Mary Doria Russell

“Le Guin brings reality itself to the proving ground.”—Theodore Sturgeon

“A master of the craft.”—Neil Gaiman

“[E]verything Le Guin does is interesting, believable, and exquisitely detailed.”—Los Angeles Herald Examiner

“Delicious . . . her worlds are haunting psychological visions molded with firm artistry.”—Library Journal

“There is no more elegant or discerning expositor than Le Guin.”—Kirkus Reviews

“‘Beauty’ is the word for what Ursula K. Le Guin has wrought here. She explores ways in which we can be foreign and alien to each other, yet still love. Sometimes I don’t even know why the tears had sprung to my eyes: I just knew that I was deeply moved.”—Nalo Hopkinson

“I don’t know anyone else who can do what Le Guin does. Her work is simple and brilliantly clear, like a Buddha’s laugh: joyfully serious, delighted with the joke that is life. Le Guin writes about love, pure and simple—love and all the ways in which it refuses to be bound—and she does so beautifully.”—Nicola Griffith

“Le Guin’s writing touches on something ancient in all of us—something atavistic, of folktales and sagas, that comes from deep inside.”—Carol Emshwiller

“Le Guin is a writer of enormous intelligence and wit, a master storyteller with the humor and the force of a Twain.”
The Boston Globe

Cover by John D. Berry.
Cover art: “Wildcat” copyright 2010 by Paul Roden & Valerie Lueth, Tugboat Printshop.

Ursula K. Le Guin has published twenty-one novels, eleven volumes of short stories, four collections of essays, twelve books for children, six volumes of poetry and four of translation, and has received the Hugo, Nebula, Endeavor, Locus, Tiptree, Sturgeon, PEN-Malamud, and National Book Award and the Pushcart and Janet Heidinger Kafka prizes, among others.

In recent years she has received lifetime achievement awards from World Fantasy Awards, Los Angeles Times, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association, and Willamette Writers, as well as the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Grand Master Award and the Library of Congress Living Legends award. Le Guin was the recipient of the Association for Library Service to Children’s May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award and the Margaret Edwards Award.

Her recent publications include the novel Lavinia, The Wild Girls, an essay collection, Cheek by Jowl, and Finding My Elegy, New and Selected Poems. She lives in Portland, Oregon.




The Unreal and the Real: Outer Space, Inner Lands

Tue 27 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Books | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Selected Stories Volume Two
Second Printing: January 2013
9781618730350 · trade cloth · 333pp · $24
9781618730374 · ebook · $14.95
Audio book available here from Recorded Books.
[See Volume 1 here.]

New: Now available in one volume from Simon & Schuster/Saga.
— Four Questions from Publishers Weekly

Don’t miss Ursula K. Le Guin’s acceptance speech upon receiving the 2014 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters from the National Book Foundation.
— Profiles in: Boston Globe · The Guardian · NPR · Los Angeles Times · New Yorker · Salon ·

Read the Paris Review interview.

Oregon Book Award winner.
World Fantasy and Locus award finalist.

For fifty years, National Book Award winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist Ursula K. Le Guin’s stories have shaped the way her readers see the world. Her work gives voice to the voiceless, hope to the outsider, and speaks truth to power. Le Guin’s writing is witty, wise, both sly and forthright; she is a master craftswomen.

This two-volume selection of almost forty stories taken from her eleven collections was made by Le Guin herself, as was the organizing principle of splitting the stories into the nominally realistic and fantastic.

Outer Space, Inner Lands has twenty stories, including such modern classics as “The Ones Who Walked Away from Omelas” and “Nine Lives” (both of which have been reprinted more than twenty times); Tiptree Award winner “The Matter of Seggri”; Nebula Award winner “Solitude”; and the secret history “Sur,” which was included in The Best American Short Stories.

Le Guin’s stories range from somber (“Small Change”) to hilarious (“The First Contact With the Gorgonids”), from fairy tales (“The Poacher”) to the quiet end of the world (“She Unnames Them”).

Stories in this volume were originally published in venues as varied as Amazing Stories, Playboy, Universe, The New Yorker, and Omni, and received the Hugo, Tiptree, Nebula, Asimov’s, and Locus awards.

Companion volume Where on Earth explores Le Guin’s satirical, political and experimental earthbound stories. Both volumes include new introductions by the author.

The Unreal and the Real is a much-anticipated event which will delight, amuse, and provoke.

Reviews

“Ms. Le Guin, though, has matured from the vividness and imagination she had from the beginning into wisdom and a clearsightedness that reaches past sympathy.”
—Tom Shippey, Wall Street Journal

“The Unreal and the Real guns from the grim to the ecstatic, from the State to the Garden of Eden, with just one dragon between. (Every collection needs one dragon.) In every good career-spanning collection, you can observe an author growing into her authority. Here, every story, in its own way and from its own universe, told in its own mode, explains that there is no better spirit in all of American letters than that of Ursula Le Guin.”
Slate“No Better Spirit”

“The metaphorical language of fantasy has the capacity to touch us in the most profound ways. But many otherwise great fantasy writers, including JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis, fall too easily into the traps of dogma and moral superiority, making their medicine sometimes hard to swallow. The stories of Ursula K Le Guin manage the sublime trick of touching our hearts while also satisfying our cynical, modern minds. For this reason her stories will pass into legend, to touch many generations to come.”
The Guardian

“Consistently excellent.”—Nerds of a Feather

“Only ‘Buffalo Gals, Won’t You Come Out Tonight’ and ‘The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas’ are among the author’s well-known classics. On the other hand, read ‘Hand, Cup, Shell’ or ‘The Matter of Segri.’ Then consider that there may really be no such thing as minor Le Guin, particularly if one is disposed to savor a command of the English language that remains nearly unequaled in the ranks of English-language sf and fantasy. Equally good as an introduction to the author’s short fiction or to fill in gaps that may remain in larger collections.”— Booklist

“Second of a two-volume set, this bare-bones collection focuses on SFWA Grand Master Le Guin’s overtly fantastic visions. Settings of 20 stories, all previously anthologized, include both the science fictional Ekumen, a community of worlds populated by humans shaped by the hubristic Hain of the distant past, to such fantastical realms as the West Reach, “where dragons breed on the lava isles.” Le Guin’s imagination ranges widely; the most interesting sequence involves the world Seggri, whose gender politics are charmingly different from ours but equally constrained. This short collection, offering samples from across Le Guin’s career to date, shows why she has been a major voice in science fiction and fantasy since the 1960s.”
Publishers Weekly

Table of Contents

Volume Two: Outer Space, Inner Lands

“Introduction”
“The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”
“Semley’s Necklace”
“Nine Lives”
“Mazes”
“The First Contact With the Gorgonids”
“The Shobies’ Story”
“Betrayals”
“The Matter of Seggri”
“Solitude”
“The Wild Girls”
“The Fliers of Gy”
“The Silence of the Asonu”
“The Ascent of the North Face”
“The Author of the Acacia Seeds”
“The Wife’s Story”
“The Rule of Names”
“Small Change”
“The Poacher”
“Sur”
“She Unnames Them” [podcast, read by the author]

Praise for Ursula K. Le Guin’s short story collections:

“She is the reigning queen of…but immediately we come to a difficulty, for what is the fitting name of her kingdom? Or, in view of her abiding concern with the ambiguities of gender, her queendom, or perhaps—considering how she likes to mix and match—her quinkdom? Or may she more properly be said to have not one such realm, but two?”
—Margaret Atwood, New York Review of Books

“She is a splendid short-story writer…. Fiction, like Borges’s, that finds its life in the interstices between the borders of speculative fiction and realism.”
San Francisco Chronicle

“Ursula Le Guin’s prose breathes light and intelligence. She can lift fiction to the level of poetry and compress it to the density of allegory.”
—Jonathan Lethem

“Like all great writers of fiction, Ursula K. Le Guin creates imaginary worlds that restore us, hearts eased, to our own.”
The Boston Globe

“Admirers of fine literature, fantastic or not, will cherish this rich offering.”—Publishers Weekly

“She wields her pen with a moral and psychological sophistication rarely seen… and while science fiction techniques often buttress her stories they rarely take them over. What she really does is write fables: splendidly intricate and hugely imaginative tales about such mundane concerns as life, death, love, and sex.”
Newsweek

“Le Guin’s powerful work illustrates that fantasy need not be escapist, that gender studies need not be dry or strident, and that entertainment need not be mindless.”
The Onion

Cover by John D. Berry.
Cover art: “Golden Apple Tree” copyright 2010 by Paul Roden & Valerie Lueth, Tugboat Printshop.

Ursula K. Le Guin has published twenty-one novels, eleven volumes of short stories, four collections of essays, twelve books for children, six volumes of poetry and four of translation, and has received the Hugo, Nebula, Endeavor, Locus, Tiptree, Sturgeon, PEN-Malamud, and National Book Award and the Pushcart and Janet Heidinger Kafka prizes, among others.

In recent years she has received lifetime achievement awards from World Fantasy Awards, Los Angeles Times, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association, and Willamette Writers, as well as the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Grand Master Award and the Library of Congress Living Legends award. Le Guin was the recipient of the Association for Library Service to Children’s May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award and the Margaret Edwards Award.

Her recent publications include the novel Lavinia, The Wild Girls, an essay collection, Cheek by Jowl, and Finding My Elegy, New and Selected Poems. She lives in Portland, Oregon.



Saddest email of the weekend

Mon 26 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Suffice to say, another copy of Errantry is on its way:

I write book reviews for XXXXX. You were nice enough to send a copy of Elizabeth Hand’s ERRANTRY, which I have been planning to write up for December — but today my bag went missing after a screening of Lincoln, of all things. (I’m fascinated trying to work out who it is who go to see Lincoln on a Saturday afternoon while keeping an eye out for bag-thieving opportunities.)



Friends on film & elsewhere

Wed 21 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Ok, so Gwenda Bond’s book Blackwood is (ok: may be) going to be made into a TV series! Cool? Cool! . . .

. . . and our neighbor one-town-over Cassandra Clare’s bestselling Mortal Instruments series breaks into movieworld next summer in The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones! (“Everything you’ve heard about monsters . . .  all the stories are true . . . “)

We went to see Cloud Atlas the other night. I think it was the first good film I’ve seen in ages. Ok, so I might not have seen anything in the cinema since The Avengers, but have I missed anything good? I’m glad we made the trip out to see Cloud Atlas. Even with the weird and bad choices (and I’m not just talking casting Tom Hanks here) the producers made, they did a good job of making a big, complicated book into a big, complicated film.

Meanwhile over in Chicago, The Chicago Nerd Social Club (what a great name!) are featuring Ted Chiang’s Stories of Your Life and Others at their next book club meeting:

When: Monday, December 10, 2012 – 6:30pm-7:30pm
Where: Filter, 1373-75 N Milwaukee Ave Chicago, IL
Cost: Free

And in Uppsala, Sweden (hello everyone in that lovely city!), Wired’s Noah Schachtman unwinds a fabulous story of a philologist who, gifted with a mysterious manuscript, eventually helps decode it:

. . . in January 2011, Schaefer attended an Uppsala conference on computational linguistics. Ordinarily talks like this gave her a headache. She preferred musty books to new technologies and didn’t even have an Internet connection at home. But this lecture was different. The featured speaker was Kevin Knight, a University of Southern California specialist in machine translation—the use of algorithms to automatically translate one language into another.

Then, down in North Carolina, the Charlotte Observer has a great story on Kelly’s cousin Bryan Jones who with his friend Mark “Hootie” Bowman (I never knew his name was Mark, I’ve only ever heard of him mentioned as Hootie!) are selling “interactive hardbacks that introduce children to popular colleges and universities.” In other words, if you have a sports-obsessed parent in your life, hie thee to Collegiate Kids Books and get them a book now.

Action movie!



A new LCRW

Tue 20 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 3 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

News!

We’ve got a table of contents for Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet 28, the one that is a little late! It should be out next month. (Have you heard that before?) Partly this was inspired by finding five new stories and poems to buy for the next issue! This issue is missing a column from our Dear Aunt Gwenda, so if you have questions for our Dear Auntie, send them along and we will see if we can bring her back for the next issue. Which may come sooner than you might expect!

Without further witherwathering, here’s the table of contents for the June December 2012 issue of LCRW:

Fiction

Michael Penkas, “Coffee with Count Presto”
Krista Hoeppner Leahy, “Killing Curses, a Caught-Heart Quest”
Kevin Waltman, “Notes from a Pleasant Land Where Broken Hearts Are Like Broken Hands”
Erica Hilderbrand, “Akashiyaki (Octopus Dumplings, serves two)”
Brian Baldi, “Springtime for the Roofer”
Andrea M. Pawley, “Vanish Girl”
Kamila Z. Miller, “Neighbors”
Helen Marshall, “The Book of Judgment”

Nonfiction

Nicole Kimberling, “Feeding Strays”

Poetry

John McKernan, “Prayer to Oatmeal”

Cover

Junyi Wu



Low stock warning

Mon 19 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

As we head into the holiday season, I’m happy to see we have some hit books that will soon be out of stock:

It looks increasingly likely that our two volume Selected Stories of Ursula K. Le Guin will be sold out by publication day (November 27).

We just got copies in of the second printing of Kij Johnson’s At the Mouth of the River of Bees so, it won’t be out of stock but for those who collect first editions, we will keep shipping them out from the office until we run out.

And although it’s now in its third printing, we still have a few first printings of Maureen F. McHugh’s collection, After the Apocalypse



Listening to Ursula K. Le Guin

Mon 19 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal. | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Right now I’m listening to Francesca Rheannon’s interview with Ursula K. Le Guin on the Writer’s Voice.



Trafalgar’s chaste light

Thu 15 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

Trafalgar cover - click to view full sizeBefore you know it we’ll be publishing our second novel by Angélica Gorodischer, Trafalgartranslated by U. of Oregon professor Amalia Gladhart. Originally published in Argentina in 1979, it’s a very light and funny book. We had some good news recently: the book is getting a small grant to help with translation costs from the “Sur” Translation Support Program of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Culture of the Argentine Republic. (Obra editada  en el marco del Programa “Sur” de Apoyo a las Traducciones del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores y Culto de  la República Argentina.) How cool is that? It is awesome.

We’re also working with Ron Guyatt on the final cover.

Trafalgar is a novel-in-stories and the first one, “By the Light of the Chaste Electronic Moon,” is more bawdy than the others, which is a funny way to set things up! But it also starts right in with Trafalgar Medrano, salesman and storyteller, who, given time and seven double coffees, will tell all about his sales trips to the farthest parts of the galaxies. Another of the stories, “Trafalgar and Josefina,” is forthcoming on Belletrista, but you can get a tiny taste of the first story here:

“By the Light of the Chaste Electronic Moon”

I was with Trafalgar Medrano yesterday. It’s not easy to find him. He’s always going here and there with that import-export business of his. But now and then he goes from there to here and he likes to sit down and drink coffee and chat with a friend. I was in the Burgundy and when I saw him come in, I almost didn’t recognize him: he had shaved off his mustache.

The Burgundy is one of those bars of which there aren’t many left, if there are any at all. None of that Formica or any fluorescent lights or Coca-Cola. Gray carpet—a little worn—real wood tables and real wood chairs, a few mirrors against the wood paneling, small windows, a single door and a façade that says nothing. Thanks to all this, inside there’s a lot of silence and anyone can sit down to read the paper or talk with someone else or even do nothing, seated at a table with a cloth, white crockery dishes, and real glass, like civilized people use, and a serious sugar bowl, and without anyone, let alone Marcos, coming to bother them.

I won’t tell you where it is because one of these days you might have adolescent sons or, worse, adolescent daughters who will find out, and goodbye peace and quiet. I’ll give you just one piece of information: it’s downtown, between a shop and a galería, and you surely pass by there every day when you go to the bank and you don’t even see it.

But Trafalgar came over to me at the table right away. 



Errantry: publication day

Wed 14 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Everyone’s favorite writer of strannnnge, uneasy, disquieting, disturbing, itchy and scratchy stories, Elizabeth Hand, has a new book, Errantry: Strange Stories (print | ebook), out today.

Errantry collects ten of Liz’s recent stories and includes the very popular “The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon” as well as Shirley Jackson Award winner, “Near Zennor.” (Between this, the forthcoming Le Guin Selected Stories and Kij Johnson‘s book, we’ve had a great year for short story fans!) And I should  mention that next year we’ll be reprinting one of our favorite of Liz’s novels, Mortal Love. More Liz, all the time!

As for Errantry, Stefan Raets writes in his review on Tor.com today:

These are stories of the overwhelmingly mystical breaking into our world in small, almost unnoticeable ways, seen from the point of view of the few people who get to witness those minor intrusions and who then have to try and process their meanings. The subtlety is deceptive: there’s something huge going on, but it’s as if we and these characters are peeking at it through a keyhole, only seeing a small glimpse of what’s on the other side and only being hit by a small portion of the light it sheds. The suggestion that that door may open further is only part of what gives these stories their “slightly sinister” atmosphere.

Liz’s stories definitely get under your skin. There’s nothing quite like reading these stories late at night with the light pooled around you and being aware that you can’t quite see what’s going on in the darker corners of the room. Is that something moving?

Errantry: Strange Stories



Errantry: Strange Stories

Wed 14 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Books, Elizabeth Hand | 5 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

November 2012 · trade paper · 9781618730305 / ebook · 9781618730312

Shirley Jackson Award finalist.

“Near Zennor” is a Shirley Jackson Award winner.
Listen to Liz reading “Hungerford Bridge.”

No one is innocent, no one unexamined in Shirley Jackson award-winning author Elizabeth Hand’s new collection of stories. From the mysterious people next door to the odd guy in the next office over, Hand teases apart the dark strangenesses of everyday life to show us the impossibilities, broken dreams, and improbable dreams that surely can never come true.

“At her best, Hand does just this: We find ourselves wrapped in an evocation without knowing fully how she got us there, shivering with fear at an image of lights or blinking with awe at the modest beauty of a small, rare creature living its life, seen from a distance.”
—Aimee Bender, Washington Post

“With grand feeling and inventiveness, Hand writes of modern life edging just into the impossible. Her ragged modern characters, often lost or stoned or just unfixed in their lives, set out over moors or into hidden parks in search of realities less dispiriting than our own.”
Village Voice

“As I was reading Errantry: Strange Stories, the phone rang. I answered it and whispered ‘Hello?’
“‘Why are you whispering?’ asked my friend.
“‘I’m reading this really bizarre book of short stories,’ I said. That was my short answer. But the long answer is this: I’m whispering because as I was reading Hand’s stories in my quiet house on a cold December day, the threads of my reality frayed a bit along the edges and it would take more than a telephone’s ring for me to pull myself back together. I’m whispering because I’m scared to disturb the intricate and delicate worlds that Hand has created in this collection of stories that alternately draw me in and scare me away.”
—Meganne Fabrega, Minneapolis Star-Tribune

I thought of this tendency a lot when reading Elizabeth Hand’s collection Errantry: Strange Stories. Though I know that Hand’s background is in work that’s less overtly realistic, I know her best through her kinda-mystery Generation Loss, which is as much a meditation on art and the passage of time, and an evocative description of an isolated coastal town in Maine, as it is a book in which someone must solve something. What makes Hand’s collection notable are those moments where the fantastical (or at least the surreal) briefly collides with the mundane, but doesn’t necessarily lead to transcendence. A couple of the stories involve brief encounters with the strange, but it’s less about the existence of the supernatural than it is on the effects of having one’s worldview fundamentally altered. In the two stories that open the collection, “The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon” and “Near Zennor,” strange things occur, but they’re within the larger contexts of memory and grief, and they’re as difficult for their characters to put together as more earthly mysteries.”
— Tobias Carroll, Vol. 1 Brooklyn

“Hand’s strangeness is redolent of the sort of disturbing, uncanny children’s books that gave you nightmares at the age of nine (for me, Alan Garner): books with malevolent forces lurking under sunny hillsides, where adults aren’t going to save our heroes, and whose endings are staggeringly bleak.”
— Nic Clarke, Strange Horizons 

“Hand’s stories here are more expansive, yet have that undercurrent of a formless force closing in, be it weather, or birds gathering in a falling evening sky.”
—Helen McCrory, Pank

“The stories confound yet delight, blurt unanswerable questions yet hold their tongue. Each will leave you scratching your head and asking, “Well, what if . . . ?” Overcoming the constraints of genre, Errantry is strange fiction at its finest.”
Rain Taxi

“No writer has cornered the market on darkly beautiful, unsettling stories. But it’s a niche that Elizabeth Hand inhabits with uncanny ease.”
Maine Sunday Telegram

“Talented Hand has won the World Fantasy Award, the Shirley Jackson Award, the Tiptree Award and the Nebula Award, among many others. The reason for this lies less in her imaginative worlds, as impressive as they can be, and more in her skill at crafting words, each phrase and each sentence carefully shaped and laid in place to create the singular diadem that is a Hand story. The tales here are all recent, and are all evidence of Hand’s prolific, fertile imagination. Hand enthusiasts should, of course, have already pre-ordered this collection; those new to her work should acquire it as soon as possible.”
Romantic Times Book Review

“Explores the odd and impossible dreams that can motivate and dishearten people in everyday life.”
Bangor Daily News

Omnivoracious: The Best Fantasy and Science Fiction Collections of 2012
“Just more evidence of the self-assurance and complexity Hand has brought to fiction in the middle part of her career.”

“When novelist and short story author Hand (“Available Dark; Generation Loss”) subtitled this collection “Strange Stories,” she gave readers a hint about what to expect. Lord Byron said “what a strange thing man is…” and it is true, everyone is a little strange, life is a little strange. This original, varied, collection of stories is not strictly fantasy, and certainly not horror, for Hand is more subtle than that. The stories are so different from each other it is hard to find a common theme or thread, but whether reading about ordinary people sharing peculiar experiences, people undergoing fantastic transformations, a young woman with supernatural powers, or a pair of witches, each story leaves the reader curious, thinking about what they read, but disquieted, with a lingering, though not necessarily unpleasant, sense of unease. VERDICT An enjoyable trip to the dark side, certainly worth a try for those who enjoy short stories but not necessarily elements of fantasy, and a must for fans of Hand’s previous work.–Shaunna Hunter, Hampden-Sydney Coll. Lib., VA
Library Journal

“Ten evocative novellas and stories whisper of hidden mysteries carved on the bruised consciousness of victims and victimizers. Memories and love are as dangerous as the supernatural, and Hand often denies readers neat conclusions, preferring disturbing ambiguity. The Hugo-nominated “The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon” marries science fiction and magical realism as three men recreate a legendary aircraft’s doomed flight for a dying woman. A grieving widow in “Near Zennor” unearths a secret of spectral kidnapping in an ancient countryside. “Hungerford Bridge,” a lesser piece, shares a secret that can only be enjoyed twice in one’s life. Celtic myth and human frailty entangle in the darkly romantic “The Far Shore.” The vicious nature of romantic love is dissected with expressionistic abandon in the dreamlike “Summerteeth.” Hand’s outsiders haunt themselves, the forces of darkness answering to the calls of their battered souls. Yet strange hope clings to these surreal elegies, insisting on the power of human emotion even in the shadow of despair. Elegant nightmares, sensuously told.”
Publishers Weekly

Table of Contents

The Maiden Flight of McCauley’s Bellerophon
Near Zennor
Hungerford Bridge [audio]
The Far Shore
Winter’s Wife
Cruel Up North
Summerteeth
The Return of the Fire Witch
Uncle Lou
Errantry

Cover image “The Hunt in the Forest” by Paolo Uccello by permission of the Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford.

Read more



P&W article

Fri 9 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Did you see the huge lovely article by Michael Bourne featuring family-run presses in the current issue of Poets & WritersThere’s a big old photo of Kelly and me (we’re the stern ones!). The article features Ig, Two Dollar Radio, and Small Beer, and looks at the joys and sorrows (er, pros and cons?) of running a publishing house together. First up: Ig Publishing, run by Robert Lasner and Elizabeth Clementson (their photo is nice and cheery!). Ig have a nice line of Dive Bar books but are perhaps best known for their popular politics titles. Next: Two Dollar Radio, run by Eric Obenauf and Eliza Wood-Obenauf—who have a fab, informal photo!—who published Grace Krilanovich’s The Orange Eats Creeps along with other books you may know. You may want to get your Two Dollar tattoo now—they’ll send you free books for life. But seventeen people have already done it and they are capping the offer at 25!

It was fun to be interviewed for the article. I always want people to talk about the books, not the press—Wait, what’s that you said about us? Oh, do tell! Let me not protest too much—and it’s hard to talk about the press without talking about our lives since the public/private split in indie press publishing can be near nonexistent.

That said, there was a fabulous article written in alternating first person by two poets, Brenda Shaughnessy and Craig Morgan Teicher, in the summer issue, Enduring Discovery: Marriage, Parenthood, and Poetry.” The couple are married and are both published poets with new books out this year. Everything went well until:

“After a healthy pregnancy with no complications, our son suffered a catastrophic brain injury at delivery…. Our beautiful, amazing boy is now five years old and he has severe cerebral palsy. He’s nonambulatory, nonverbal, and has a smile that lights up a room like nothing else. Yes, we’ve been through hell, but we’ve had this angelic, loving, marvelous child with us the whole time.”

Both poets speak about their own lives, their family, and their work so clearly and strongly that I had to stop and read the whole article at once and then put their new books on the To Be Read list. So I like other people talking about their lives! Thanks for the write-up, Poets & Writers!<



Beers of WFC 2012

Fri 9 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Michael

newlogo03Fermented Adventures was well represented at World Fantasy Convention in Toronto this past weekend. As you can imagine, we went at it in earnest, like the semipro drinkers…er, writers…we are.

I bought and saved up beers over a couple months until I had 24 bottles of really good Michigan beer. I muled it (legally) over international lines. Then Scott, Raj and I and a crowd of other writers sampled and shared them all weekend alongside Toronto microbrews liberally provided by con staff, hotel bar and friends.

1_107309126_3It all went (gloriously) something like this:

  • Mill Street Organic, Toronto – a yellow lager, meh
  • Steam Whistle Pilsener, Canada – very nice, crisp and authentic-tasting
  • Frankenmuth Pilsener, Michigan – Not quite as authentically German-style but I like it
  • Arcadia Loch Down, Michigan – a very nice scotch ale, 7% alcohol, round, easy drinking
  • Bells Double Cream Stout, Michigan – reviewed earlier by Scott, decent but not mind-blowing.
  • Growler of IPA from some local Toronto brewpub – spicy, earthy, citrusy, medium bitter, a kitchen sink IPA
  • Smithwicks – Not nearly as good as the Arcadia scotch ale.
  • Rickard’s Red, Molson – Not bad. Middle o’ the road.
  • OGH-S10-GGG_SteamWhistle1

  • Bells Cherry Stout – We love the sour/stout combo. This as far as I’m concerned is the exemplar.
  • Founders Breakfast Stout, Michigan – the gold standard
  • Pilgrim’s Dole Wheat Wine, New Holland, Michigan – a huge 12% alcohol wheat wine with currant, plum flavor notes. Amazing, but would have been 100x better if I’d aged it 3 years first.
  • Dark Horse Blueberry Imperial Stout, Michigan – The blueberry is almost all in the nose, so not quite a sour stout but still delicious.
  • Mill Street Coffee Porter, Toronto – A tiny bit too much coffee for me in a porter this light.
  • Atwater Block Bourbon Barrel Porter, Michigan
  • A different growler of IPA from some local Toronto brewpub – Super-citrusy, aggressively bitter, a bit much for me but nice to sample.
  • Motor City Brewing Works Hard Cider, Detroit – Best Detroit area cider I’ve had, dry, strongly effervescent, acidic, strong in tannin, with funky earthy notes from the yeast. Must buy more….
  • 1_105182134_3-214x300

  • 2012 Hot Pepper Chocolate Stout, my homebrew – This one had a pepper in the bottle, very fiery indeed
  • 2011 Sweet Fern Scotch Ale, my homebrew – A 70 shilling ale flavored with a pinch of wild-harvested sweet fern, a spicy, woody perennial
  • 2011 Cyser, my homebrew
  • 2011 Honey Porter, my homebrew

And that’s just the ones I can remember!



The Diary of a Young Monster Hunter

Thu 8 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Cover Image: Emma Tupper's DiaryNext year we are reprinting Peter Dickinson’s novel Eva Tupper’s Diary. Guess who did the cover? Kathleen Jennings, yay! Publishing being what it is, we’re telling the sales reps about the book now so that they can take it to the booksellers and then when you wander into your local bookshop next May, boom! there it is. Emma arrives in Scotland to spend the summer with her cousins, the McAndrews. The McAndrews have the typical kid’s book family: a late mother, a distant father, and an assortment of cousins four years apart from 14 onup.

There’s also a mini-submarine and perhaps more. Here’s an excerpt from early on in the book:

“Creature?” said Emma. “Do you mean a monster?”

Andy laughed.

“Oh yes, we’ve got one of those,” he said. “It’s made of rafts of weed which get carried up from the bottom by gases from decaying stuff underneath them. They make black hummocks, quite long sometimes, so that you see several things in line that might be the humps of a sea-serpent, and then the gas gets out and they sink again. That’s what all the monsters really are—Loch Ness and Loch Morar as well as ours. How long since anybody saw its head, Mary? Mouth, eyes, teeth?”

“Och, you’ll not see them and live,” said Mary placidly. “But there was poachers came up from Glasgow when you were in your cradle, Master Andy—an ignorant class of men, as everybody knows there’s no fish worth poaching in our loch. But they brought two boats by night, and nets, and by morning both boats were overturned and three of the men vanished. Those were the last poachers I heard of coming this way.”

“And the first,” said Roddy, “if everyone knows there’s no fish worth poaching. Hey!”

Mary had walked round behind his chair while he was talking, and now biffed him hard on the ear with her open palm; then she nodded to Emma and walked out smiling. Roddy rubbed his ear and went on eating his toast.

“Even if there’s only a story about a monster. . .” said Emma. “I mean there’s only a story about Loch Ness.”

“That one’s had two hundred years to spread,” said Andy.

“But things happen so much faster now,” said Emma. “I mean if only you could get your story on television . . .”

“Cousin Emma,” said Andy, lordly and handsome, “you have only just reached civilisation after a formative childhood in the desert. Understandably you are besotted by the television set. But you will later learn that it cannot do everything—in particular it cannot make one stretch of water which might have a monster in it look more interesting than another stretch of water which might not.”

“He’s the expert,” said Roddy. “His girl’s in the Glasgow studios.”

 

 



A Better Day

Wed 7 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal. | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

After a shorter night than expected, this is a better day than expected. Mitt Romney’s speech, when at last it came, was gracious. At some point soon perhaps he will be relieved to be off the campaign trail for the first time in many years.

President Obama’s speech was strong. He won the popular vote and the electoral college. He speaks to everyone, not only just communities. In immediately reaching across the aisle and offering to work together in government with the Republican party he offered a way forward for a polarized nation.

I am proud of this country’s continued ability to peacefully run elections and transfer power. That said, I’d vote for election day being a paid, Federal holiday at the drop of a hat. In a participant democracy, voting should be easy, not hard. The NYTimes says the country drifted rightward. No matter which way the country leans, I hope it will continue to tack toward a future where health care, inclusiveness, and the common weal—looking after the 100%—is in the forefront.

As hundreds of thousand of people are still without power—the latest victims of ever worsening weather—I recommend that the PACs and SuperPACs on all sides of the political spectrum send what is left of their funds here:

Red Cross.

First Books.

(Further suggestions welcome!)

Also: yay!



Endorsing President Obama

Thu 1 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal. | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

On Election Day, I am voting for President Obama. I hope you will, too.

Hurricane Sandy really brought home to me the differences between the two candidates and how important it is that Mr. Romney is not elected. He would close FEMA (because New Jersey and New York—like Louisiana before them—can pay for all the damage themselves?) and believes that 47% of the country is outwith his remit. He seems not to realize that the President is the President to all Americans, regardless of party affiliation.

Given that the Republican Party’s strategy of government has been to try to stop any bills with presidential support being passed instead of trying to work with the elected government, I don’t suppose he is just toeing the party line. For four years they’ve tried to block any actual governing from happening. The GOP would rather the country ground to a halt instead of having Obama as president. It is hard to believe that a party would seriously choose this strategy and expect to be elected.

Hurricane Sandy only meant high winds and some rain in Western Mass. We were very lucky. We have spent the last 3 years and 8 months feeling lucky. Our daughter, Ursula, was born prematurely in February 2009 and spent her first 14 months in the hospital. We were lucky that the emergency generators kicked in during the worst storms while she was in hospital. We didn’t have to carry her (or watch while the nurses did it) out of the hospital while attached to all her tubes and machines. Reading about the kids and patients being evacuated from NYU Hospital was horrifying. While Ursula was in hospital we walked along beside her on the way from one room to another while nurses hand pumped her ventilator. It was no fun in a bright, daylit hospital. I cannot imagine in at night, without power, in a hurricane. Those nurses are fantastic.

Sometimes a person needs taken care of by someone other than themselves and their family. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has looked after Ursula in ways that we never expected and for which we will be eternally grateful. Ursula’s care has cost somewhere around a couple of  million dollars. We would be bankrupt and homeless if we had had to pay for it. So I am extremely grateful to Governor Romney for the work he did to instill safety nets and to widen the health care coverage in Massachusetts. If he had the courage of his convictions and was supporting extending this very successful plan nationwide, I would consider supporting him. Instead he intends to cut these programs and continue the transfer of wealth to his own people, the 1%.

Sometimes a group of people need to be taken care of by someone other than themselves and their family. Hurricane Sandy illustrated that even New York State (with almost 20 million people) and New Jersey (8.8 million) need help.

In The New Yorker‘s endorsement of Obama they included this:

“A visitor to the F.D.R. Memorial, in Washington, is confronted by these words from Roosevelt’s second Inaugural Address, etched in stone: ‘The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide for those who have too little.'”

I don’t want a nanny state. I don’t want government health care to be the only option. But I want it to be an available option. If people have the money or will to pay for private health care, that option should be available. But in a civilized country there should not be 44 million people without health insurance.

The last four years, following directly on a terrible financial crash, have been hard. The eight before that were desperate: two wars kicked off, off-the-record prisons around the world, the USA used (uses?) torture as an everyday tool, individual rights were trampled, the people’s voices were ignored. Going back to that, but adding on contempt for the middle and working class (never mind the working poor, homeless, and all other disenfranchised groups) and a focus on money flowing to the monied over the weal of the common people is a nightmare that would send this country into the past, rather than into the future.

This country was founded by a bunch of individuals who managed to get together, despite their differences, and form a government. That government has been a living changing idea ever since. I believe that this country deserves a government who will look after the people first, not the corporations, and that is why we will be voting for President Obama on Tuesday.

Gavin J. Grant
Kelly  Link

 

 



2012 Holiday Shipping deadlines

Thu 1 Nov 2012 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Here are the last mailing dates before Christmas/your holiday of choice from the US Post Office.

Media Mail shipping is included in all our prices and Priority Mail can be added.

Remember that all mail slows down at the holidays. Media Mail packages are only included by the post office if and when there is space so they can languish for days during the holidays. If you are ordering after December 1st, 2012, and you would like your books to arrive for Christmas we recommend choosing Priority Mail.

You can also buy Gift Certificates to Small Beer or Weightless.

Holiday Dates for Domestic Mail

Calculated for December 25, 2012.

Domestic Mail Class/Product Dates
First-Class Mail® Service Dec. 20
Priority Mail® Service Dec. 21
Express Mail® Service* Dec. 22
Parcel Post® Service Dec. 14
Destination Network Distribution Center (DNDC) Drop Ship Dec. 19
Destination Delivery Unit (DDU) Drop Ship Dec. 21

* Some Express Mail destinations may have extended service commitments.

Holiday Dates for International Mail

Calculated for December 25, 2012.

Destination Priority
Mail® Service
First-Class
Mail
International®
Service
Africa Dec. 3 Dec. 3
Asia / Pacific Rim Dec. 10 Dec. 10
Australia / New Zealand Dec. 10 Dec. 10
Canada Dec. 13 Dec. 10
Caribbean Dec. 13 Dec. 10
Central & South America Dec. 3 Dec. 3
Mexico Dec. 10 Dec. 10
Europe Dec. 13 Dec. 10
Middle East Dec. 13 Dec. 10

Holiday Dates for Military Mail

Calculated for December 25, 2012.

Addressed to First-Class Mail®
Service
Priority Mail® Service
APO/FPO/DPO AE
ZIPs™ 090-092
Dec. 10 Dec. 10
APO/FPO/DPO AE
ZIP 093
Dec. 3 Dec. 3
APO/FPO/DPO AE
ZIPs 094-098
Dec. 10 Dec. 10
APO/FPO/DPO AA
ZIP 340
Dec. 10 Dec. 10
APO/FPO/DPO AP
ZIPs 962-966
Dec. 10 Dec. 10