Dear Aunt Gwenda

Fri 12 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

We are putting together, slowly and so on, the new issue of LCRW and we would like some more questions for Dear Aunt Gwenda. The questions can be anonymous or not (we will mail you a copy of the zine your question is in). Please email them in or post them in the comments.



Our town needs Christopher Rowe

Thu 11 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

bike wranglerThere’s an excellent article about our favorite Yellow Bike Wrangler, Christopher Rowe, in the Lexington Weekly . . . which made us think how cool it would be if we had a Yellow Bike Program. Hmm. Wonder if we can make that happen.

Also, we’ve given many sets of Heifer‘s Bees and Trees, how cool would it be to give a town a bike?



Thu 11 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

John Freeman is writing some great posts from the Frankfurt Book Fair about the relationship of the US to the rest of the world, translations, Doris Lessing’s lovely news, and more.



Thu 11 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

John Freeman is writing some great posts from the Frankfurt Book Fair about the relationship of the US to the rest of the world, translations, Doris Lessing’s lovely news, and more.



Wed 10 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Listening to Radiohead.

Trying to do taxes.

Not missing the artwork from the CD yet.

Missing some receipts as ever.



Wed 10 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Listening to Radiohead.

Trying to do taxes.

Not missing the artwork from the CD yet.

Missing some receipts as ever.



Blog Like Me 7: One for Ned Ludd (II)

Tue 9 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 2 Comments| Posted by: Howard Waldrop

Skeptical HowardLast week I talked about typewriter ribbons in this Electronic-Cyber Age. ( These blogs, if you can’t scroll back, is written longhand, typed up on an Adler Manual Portable typewriter, and snail-mailed to Small Beer, who turn it into pixels.)

Let’s talk about the real work going on here: handwritten drafts.

As goes the typewriter ribbon ( $2.89 for all black cotton ribbons in the late 70s to bastard hybrid half-black half white ones for $4.00 in the 80s and 90s, to a now-again all usable all-black nylon one in the 00s for [email protected]), so goes the fountain pen.

(The difference: typewriters have always been working-class objects—if you’re a business person, you get a working-class person to type up what you say or write: fountain pens from the first were considered luxury items and signs of success—there’s always been a sucker-market for one-of-a-kind and designer pens—check out some books on fountain-pen collecting and see how many diamond-encrusted 24 kt gold-nibbed pens you see…)

Anyway: the pens I use more than any others are what was always a working-class pen—two Schaeffer Scripto cartridge fountain pens I got at least 25 years ago, still going strong. (I wore the nib off my oldest Schaeffer pen about 15 years ago that had been in service since just after I got out of the US Army in the early 70s…)

When cartridge-ink fountain pens came along ~1960, the fountain pen industry had the first viable challenge to the ballpoint pens that had ruled since the late 1940s (Biro, its American offshoot, Bic, and Parker) As long as fountain pens had to be filled by siphoning, or bulb reservoir or something—a messy precedure because the very instrument with which you wrote had to be submerged in an ink supply, and then cleaned, and was subject turning your new Christmas shirt into a wearable Rorsach test, the ball-point was going to be instrument of choice.

When the ink-cartridge pen appeared, all the mess was gone, and sales took off. For the first time, you had working-class fountain pens. You unscrewed the barrel of the pen, took out the empty plastic cartridge, dropped in a full one, where it was harpooned by a little hollow projection when you screwed the front end back into the barrel—voila!—you were an ink-slinging warrior once more.

The problem with ink-cartridge pens from the start was that each company had its own cartridge—there was no standardization. Its stuff only fit its pens. Mt.Blanc used itty-bitty ones that gave you around 2000 wds (because they were mostly used by executives to put their name or initials on some document): Wearever and Parker had big long ones that would dry up before an executive could use it all up; Schaeffer was the working-class choice of high-school and college students everywhere—a size cartridge halfway between the two. They came with colored barrels; transparent barrels so you could see the ink as it was used up; and translucent colored barrels for people who couldn’t makeup their minds. The two I still use have a solid blue barrel and a translucent green one.

Anyway, as electronic data took over (“the paperless office”) ink cartridges started getting scarce and expensive. (The Schaeffers were still 98¢ or $1.19 for six in 1970s.) The only Mt. Blanc I’ve ever owned was given me by friends at whose wedding I’d been Best Man. The price of cartridges killed me. Then I found that Wal-Mart marketed a substitute for it under the Stratos name. They came in a blister-pack of 6 for &2.99 (they also fit a bunch of calligraphy pens). I bought those for years and used the Mt.Blanc pen. Then suddenly you couldn’t find the 6-pack anymore—they only came in 12-packs for $5.99—twice the product for twice the price (but in my case meant I had to have $6.00 lose rather than $3.00…) I wrote the Mt. Blanc to a gallant Gallic-Swiss death: the front end of the barrel developed a hairline crack leading to great splotches of ink all over my writin’ hand, because the screw-down barrel was loosened… I buried it with full military honors, like they finally did Dreyfuss (the pen lasted longer than the marriage, by the way…).

Through the years I’ve had the Mt. Blanc; Schaeffers (the workhorses), Montefiores, some red plastic 4/ $2.00 Chinese pens I got from American Sci. and Surp. ( fine until the tin nibs got scratchy when the plating wore off, and the barrels loosened and leaked…) and a Lamy.

As late as two years ago, you could get the Schaeffer cartridges for as little as $2.49 for five, and you got around 5000 wds per each one; now, since a bunch of calligraphy pens are made to fit them, they go at both Michael’s and Office Mac for 5/$5.99—Office Depot, like so many other places, has quite carrying them entirely, and only carry luxury-market Mt. Blanc and Waterman cartridges. Wal-Mart has quit carrying the Stratos Brand altogether.

Once every drugstore and Five-and–Dime in American carried the Scripto cartridges, cheap. No more.

As I quoted Norman Mailer last time: “ You either change, or your pay more for staying the same.”

Howard Waldrop



Mon 8 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

To whomever mailed us tickets to the forthcoming Led Zeppelin show in London on November 26th—and even though there has been no sign of the tickets so we are not really sure they exist, come on, surely someone out there (besides us) thought it would be a great idea to mail us a set of them?—thank you, that’s beyond awesome. And sending air tickets? That’s just too nice. We’ll never be able to thank you enough.

See you there. We’ll be the ones in bell bottoms.

Of course the tickets haven’t arrived yet. They didn’t arrive today because it was a federal holiday. So they’ll probably arrive tomorrow.

Yup. Tomorrow.

Or Wednesday at the latest.

Right?



Mon 8 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

To whomever mailed us tickets to the forthcoming Led Zeppelin show in London on November 26th—and even though there has been no sign of the tickets so we are not really sure they exist, come on, surely someone out there (besides us) thought it would be a great idea to mail us a set of them?—thank you, that’s beyond awesome. And sending air tickets? That’s just too nice. We’ll never be able to thank you enough.

See you there. We’ll be the ones in bell bottoms.

Of course the tickets haven’t arrived yet. They didn’t arrive today because it was a federal holiday. So they’ll probably arrive tomorrow.

Yup. Tomorrow.

Or Wednesday at the latest.

Right?



Sun 7 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Ed Park gets swept away to Aegypt (with more to come next week):

Now that Overlook Press has brought out “Aegypt” as “The Solitudes” (Crowley’s preferred title) and will soon dust off two other works in the “Aegypt” cycle (1994’s “Love & Sleep” and 2000’s “Daemonomania”), and Small Beer Press has issued the Aegyptian finale, “Endless Things” (the subject of next month’s Astral Weeks column), it’s as though a string of curiously beautiful planets has emerged from a long, cold shadow. As if “Aegypt” had been waiting all along for me to discover it.

The new edition of The Solitudes is out this week, Love & Sleep is due in January, and Daemonomania is due out in spring. Endless Things is out out out.



Sun 7 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Ed Park gets swept away to Aegypt (with more to come next week):

Now that Overlook Press has brought out “Aegypt” as “The Solitudes” (Crowley’s preferred title) and will soon dust off two other works in the “Aegypt” cycle (1994’s “Love & Sleep” and 2000’s “Daemonomania”), and Small Beer Press has issued the Aegyptian finale, “Endless Things” (the subject of next month’s Astral Weeks column), it’s as though a string of curiously beautiful planets has emerged from a long, cold shadow. As if “Aegypt” had been waiting all along for me to discover it.

The new edition of The Solitudes is out this week, Love & Sleep is due in January, and Daemonomania is due out in spring. Endless Things is out out out.



Fri 5 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

From Critical Mass:

Yesterday, former NBCC finalist Edwidge Danticat testified before the U.S. Congress’ Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security and International Law. It is our priviledge to publish the text of this powerful testimony — which is the basis of her new memoir, “Brother, I’m Dying” – here.

Danticat’s testimony.



Fri 5 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

From Critical Mass:

Yesterday, former NBCC finalist Edwidge Danticat testified before the U.S. Congress’ Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security and International Law. It is our priviledge to publish the text of this powerful testimony — which is the basis of her new memoir, “Brother, I’m Dying” – here.

Danticat’s testimony.



Fri 5 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Thank you Yoana — our first LCRW subscriber from Bulgaria!

Maybe she is a reader of the Del Rey Internet Newsletter which just posted the Preface from The Best of LCRW. Or maybe she is a reader of the Romantic Times and saw this review. They know we are old (old!) romantics at heart.

Found a great review we had missed (how!?) by Adrienne Martini in the Baltimore City Paper—Baltimore, city of the awesome Atomic Books. Plus, look at that great illo by Deanna Staffo—it’s definitely worth putting a book out to get illustrations like that. Now, more! Can’t wait to see how the NYT book review illustrates it.

Cough.

The Best of Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet Cover THE BEST OF LADY CHURCHILL’S ROSEBUD WRISTLET
by Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant, eds.
RT Rating: ½


Fri 5 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Thank you Yoana — our first LCRW subscriber from Bulgaria!

Maybe she is a reader of the Del Rey Internet Newsletter which just posted the Preface from The Best of LCRW. Or maybe she is a reader of the Romantic Times and saw this review. They know we are old (old!) romantics at heart.

Found a great review we had missed (how!?) by Adrienne Martini in the Baltimore City Paper—Baltimore, city of the awesome Atomic Books. Plus, look at that great illo by Deanna Staffo—it’s definitely worth putting a book out to get illustrations like that. Now, more! Can’t wait to see how the NYT book review illustrates it.

Cough.

The Best of Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet Cover THE BEST OF LADY CHURCHILL’S ROSEBUD WRISTLET
by Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant, eds.
RT Rating: ½


Wed 3 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Kelly’s story “Magic for Beginners” is a nominee for the Le Grand Prix de l’Imaginaire. (Wow!) (via)

And: Kelly has a new story, “Light'” in the new issue of Tin House. She is reading with Lucy Corin, Shelley Jackson, and Samantha Hunt at 7 PM on Friday in New York City.

It looks like an amazing issue, check out the ToC. Also, you can read the whole of “Light.” (Thatlink will change in a couple of months.)



Wed 3 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Kelly’s story “Magic for Beginners” is a nominee for the Le Grand Prix de l’Imaginaire. (Wow!) (via)

And: Kelly has a new story, “Light'” in the new issue of Tin House. She is reading with Lucy Corin, Shelley Jackson, and Samantha Hunt at 7 PM on Friday in New York City.

It looks like an amazing issue, check out the ToC. Also, you can read the whole of “Light.” (Thatlink will change in a couple of months.)



Wed 3 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

10/30: Mark the day on your calendars for an Interfictions event at McNally Robinson in NYC with Delia Sherman, Matt Cheney, K. Tempest Bradford, and Veronica Schanoes.

There’s a great review by Laird Hunt of Interfictions in the new issue of Rain Taxi, which makes for fascinating reading, more so than quoting. Besides, Rain Taxi is well worth seeking out. Most indie book stores carry it (it’s free) or you can subscribe. Seek!

And: There’s also a review of Endless Things in Rain Taxi. Since Aegypt the 1st (aka The Solitudes) is coming out this week in paperback—kicking off the whole series being reprinted in pb—expect a number of high profile reviews of the whole series.

John Joseph Adams digs for the truth behind The Best of LCRW.



Wed 3 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

10/30: Mark the day on your calendars for an Interfictions event at McNally Robinson in NYC with Delia Sherman, Matt Cheney, K. Tempest Bradford, and Veronica Schanoes.

There’s a great review by Laird Hunt of Interfictions in the new issue of Rain Taxi, which makes for fascinating reading, more so than quoting. Besides, Rain Taxi is well worth seeking out. Most indie book stores carry it (it’s free) or you can subscribe. Seek!

And: There’s also a review of Endless Things in Rain Taxi. Since Aegypt the 1st (aka The Solitudes) is coming out this week in paperback—kicking off the whole series being reprinted in pb—expect a number of high profile reviews of the whole series.

John Joseph Adams digs for the truth behind The Best of LCRW.



Blog Like Me 6: One For Ned Ludd

Tue 2 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 3 Comments| Posted by: Howard Waldrop

Skeptical HowardEverybody knows, I hope, these blogs are written in longhand, typed up on the last Adler manual portable typewriter ever produced (1975) and sent via US Mail to your capable Editors.

Then they do whatever it is they do, some arcane magic, and it turns into photons delivered to your house.

People (especially publishers) keep asking me when I’m going to get a word processor or computer or whatever.

“I produce words on paper,” I say. “ You print words on paper. How it gets from one to the other is not my bowl of rice.”

A tres charmant blend of practicality and Luddism, I think.

Norman Mailer ( who said a lot of crap, some of it very true indeed) wrote once years ago: “ You change, or you pay more for staying the same.”

Boy, did he have that right.

Just before they stopped making typewriters ( a fine tradition for @ 110 years) they got it exactly right. They began making true Universal typewriter ribbon spools—ones that fit almost every typewriter made after about 1920. They had two sets of perforations in the tops and bottoms of the spools, one side or the other fit the projections in the spool-carriers of almost anything. The ribbons were all-black cotton, and when you’d use them so long the ink was fading, you turned the spools upside down and used the part of the ribbon that had only been used when you pushed the “shift” key heretofore. If that didn’t work, you unspooled the ribbon, turned it over and respooled it to get at the new ink. With an all-black ribbon you got twice the usefulness.

They cost @ $2.89 in 1977 money.

But wait—when typewriters started getting scarce, the namby-pambies who didn’t want to ever see what was in a typewriter, demanded of the office suppliers they wanted Universal correcting typewriter ribbons; so for a while all you could find were half-white/ half-black ribbons that fit all typewriters. ( I cried out “ That’s what White-Out was made for! You effete snobs!”—but no one listened.) Or, horror of horrors, half black/half red, useless for a writer.

It was bad enough getting a half-correcting/ half-black ribbon when they first came out ( you were getting half the useful ribbon for a higher price, than formerly when they were still made of cotton. About ten years ago they changed them to nylon.)

That would have been a semi-viable alternative EXCEPT the ribbons tended to split and separate, jamming up in the ribbon guides sometimes, but most often being torn apart and jamming right in the business part where the keys strike.

Enough, enough I said. I went looking for something I could use.

I had spare sets of Universal spools—when even the second side of the ribbon became faint, I’d disconnect one of the spools, put the spool with the ribbon on it back in the box and writer –Used,  6/99 –or whatever on it, so I’d know how old it was.

(Many a time, finishing some mss on a deadline, I’d have to dig an old used ribbon out and finish the last three pages or so of a story—it was sharper and clearer than the ribbon that had just died on me while pounding out “ The Wolf-Man of Alcatraz” or “ The Bravest Girl I Ever Knew”—in fact, nearly all the xeroxes of my mss lately are sharper and clearer than the original typescripts.)

I found that OkiData, who still made ribbons for its printing calculators, used an all-black cotton ribbon for them, and that Carters—who were the people who had invented the Universal ribbon spools, were still making the replacements.

You guessed it: I bought the OkiData 62 Carters spools, unwound them and respooled them on the universal spools, a messy process, but one that left me with a ribbon that could be used twice, like in the old days. They cost, in the 90s, about $4.00 a ribbon, and they were about 15’ shorter than the typewriter ribbons had been.

Now, once again, there are so many Luddites still with typewriters, their voices have been heard, Carters is now making once again an all-black ribbon ( nylon now) on a Universal spool ( the kind men like!) They cost $5.95 @, or more than double what you paid in the 1970s for a better product.

But it is a lot easier than unspooling calculator ribbons on a cold winter’s night, and having to wash your hands in Go-Jo five times afterwards….

Next time : Pens!

Howard Waldrop



Mon 1 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sign your name, maybe help the Burmese? Who knows. Worth a try. Sign, forward, etc.

—– Original Message —–
From: Ricken Patel –  <mailto:[email protected]> Avaaz.org
To: [email protected]
Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 1:50 PM
Subject: Burma: Stop the Bloodshed

Dear friends,

The worst is happening – over the last few days, Burma’s generals have unleashed terror on the peaceful monks and protesters: shooting and beating many to death, and taking others away to torture chambers where at this moment they must be enduring the unbearable.

We can stop this horror. Burma’s powerful sponsor China can halt the killing, if it believes that its international reputation and the 2008 Olympics in Beijing depend on it. To convince the Chinese government, Avaaz is launching a major global and Asian ad campaign on Tuesday that will deliver our message and the number of signers. Our petition has exploded to over 200,000 signers in just 72 hours, but we need 1 million voices to be the global roar that will get China’s attention. If every one of us forwards this email to just 20 friends, we’ll reach our target in the next 72 hours. Please sign the petition at the link below -if you haven’t already- and forward this email to everyone you care about:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/stand_with_burma/p.php

The petition will also be delivered to the UN Secretary-General, and we will broadcast the news of our effort over radio to Burma’s people, telling them not to lose hope, that the world is with them.

The Burmese people are showing incredible courage in the face of horror. The fate of many brave and good people is in our hands, we must help them – and we have hours, not days, to do it. Please sign the petition and forward this email to at least 20 friends right now.

With hope and determination,

Ricken, Paul, Pascal, Graziela, Galit, Ben, Milena and the whole Avaaz Team

PS: if you would like to join in the massive wave of demonstrations happening around the world at Burmese and Chinese embassies, scroll down our petition page for details of times and events.

_____________________________________
Please add [email protected] to your address book to make sure you keep receiving emails from Avaaz. Avaaz.org is staffed by a global team of campaigners operating on 3 continents. We have administrative offices in London, New York, and Rio de Janeiro. Please direct mail to our NY office at 260 Fifth Avenue, 9th floor, New York, NY 10001 U.S.A.



Mon 1 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sign your name, maybe help the Burmese? Who knows. Worth a try. Sign, forward, etc.

—– Original Message —–
From: Ricken Patel –  <mailto:[email protected]> Avaaz.org
To: [email protected]
Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 1:50 PM
Subject: Burma: Stop the Bloodshed

Dear friends,

The worst is happening – over the last few days, Burma’s generals have unleashed terror on the peaceful monks and protesters: shooting and beating many to death, and taking others away to torture chambers where at this moment they must be enduring the unbearable.

We can stop this horror. Burma’s powerful sponsor China can halt the killing, if it believes that its international reputation and the 2008 Olympics in Beijing depend on it. To convince the Chinese government, Avaaz is launching a major global and Asian ad campaign on Tuesday that will deliver our message and the number of signers. Our petition has exploded to over 200,000 signers in just 72 hours, but we need 1 million voices to be the global roar that will get China’s attention. If every one of us forwards this email to just 20 friends, we’ll reach our target in the next 72 hours. Please sign the petition at the link below -if you haven’t already- and forward this email to everyone you care about:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/stand_with_burma/p.php

The petition will also be delivered to the UN Secretary-General, and we will broadcast the news of our effort over radio to Burma’s people, telling them not to lose hope, that the world is with them.

The Burmese people are showing incredible courage in the face of horror. The fate of many brave and good people is in our hands, we must help them – and we have hours, not days, to do it. Please sign the petition and forward this email to at least 20 friends right now.

With hope and determination,

Ricken, Paul, Pascal, Graziela, Galit, Ben, Milena and the whole Avaaz Team

PS: if you would like to join in the massive wave of demonstrations happening around the world at Burmese and Chinese embassies, scroll down our petition page for details of times and events.

_____________________________________
Please add [email protected] to your address book to make sure you keep receiving emails from Avaaz. Avaaz.org is staffed by a global team of campaigners operating on 3 continents. We have administrative offices in London, New York, and Rio de Janeiro. Please direct mail to our NY office at 260 Fifth Avenue, 9th floor, New York, NY 10001 U.S.A.



Mon 1 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

This is awesome.  Go get a free, cheap, expensive (you choose) Radiohead album. (Album because it’s not really a CD or record—unless you want to pop for the $80 edition).

Meanwhile, Apple keep locking away their phone and mp3 players (and no doubt every other device they have planned) while Nokia are pulling a Radiohead and saying Go ahead, do what you want. Really hope Nokia do well with this because for all their great design and easy use (this post being written on a Mac), Apple’s corporate ethos is crap. Sorry, Apple, we have many of your products, but the love, well…. Defending your bad behavior? It’s getting old and so are we. Who has time for crap relationships? So maybe we will buy the machines, but sign out of the religion.

On Wednesday, go listen to Maureen talk about Alt. Reality Games.

A nice Best of LCRW review at SF Site.

The stories Link and Grant have selected over the past ten years are deserving of a broader readership and, with The Best of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet now in bookstores, they will, it is hoped, achieve that readership.

Interfictions podcasts.



Mon 1 Oct 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

This is awesome.  Go get a free, cheap, expensive (you choose) Radiohead album. (Album because it’s not really a CD or record—unless you want to pop for the $80 edition).

Meanwhile, Apple keep locking away their phone and mp3 players (and no doubt every other device they have planned) while Nokia are pulling a Radiohead and saying Go ahead, do what you want. Really hope Nokia do well with this because for all their great design and easy use (this post being written on a Mac), Apple’s corporate ethos is crap. Sorry, Apple, we have many of your products, but the love, well…. Defending your bad behavior? It’s getting old and so are we. Who has time for crap relationships? So maybe we will buy the machines, but sign out of the religion.

On Wednesday, go listen to Maureen talk about Alt. Reality Games.

A nice Best of LCRW review at SF Site.

The stories Link and Grant have selected over the past ten years are deserving of a broader readership and, with The Best of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet now in bookstores, they will, it is hoped, achieve that readership.

Interfictions podcasts.



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