Year’s Best ToC

Fri 29 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

More table-of-contenty goodness. This is for the fantasy section of The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror 2007: Twentieth Annual Collection edited by Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant. Ellen Datlow will post her horror selections on her Amazon blog (don’t call it that!) and various message boards. We’ve sent in our picks to the man behind the book, Jim Frenkel, who is doing the permissions and contracts and so on.

We’re just received the ARC (which includes all the summations and the Honorable Mentions)—Powell’s doesn’t have the cover for some reason and only has Kelly’s name. Amazon has the cover and only Ellen’s bio. Ingram has Ellen and Kelly. Gavin = the invisible man!

The reason posting this took so long was the trying (and failing) to track down rights to Mark Haddon’s excellent poem “The Seventh Circle” from his collection The Talking Horse and The Sad Girl, The Village Under the Sea. Ah well, can’t win them all.

Looking forward to seeing what people think.

Nathalie Anderson, “Tell“, (poem) The Journal of Mythic Arts, Summer/Autumn
Jeanne Marie Beaumont, “Is Rain My Bearskin?”, (poem) Fairy Tale Review, Green Issue
Josh Bell, “Yep, I Said Camel, (poem) Ninth Letter, Vol. 3, No.1
Paul Di Filippo, “Femavillle 29”, Salon Fantastique
Jeffrey Ford, “The Night Whiskey”, Salon Fantastique
Ben Fountain, “The Good Ones are Already Taken”, Brief Encounters with Che Guevara
Jeannine Hall Gailey, “Persephone and the Prince Meet Over Drinks” and “Becoming The Villainess” (Poems) Becoming the Villainess
Frances Hardinge, “Halfway House”, Alchemy 3
Minsoo Kang, “A Fearful Symmetry”, Of Tales and Enigmas
Ellen Klages, “In the House of the Seven Librarians”, Firebirds Rising
Tim Pratt, “Cup and Table”, Twenty Epics
M. Rickert, “Journey into the Kingdom”, F&SF, May
Benjamin Rosenbaum, “A Siege of Cranes”, Twenty Epics
Christopher Rowe, “Another Word for Map Is Faith”, F&SF, August
Geoff Ryman, “Pol Pot’s Beautiful Daughter”, F&SF, Oct/Nov
John Schoffstall, “Fourteen Experiments in Postal Delivery”, Strange Horizons, June 5
Ira Sher, “Lionflower Hedge”, ParaSpheres
Delia Sherman, “La Fee Verte”, Salon Fantastique
Ysabeau S. Wilce, “The Lineaments of Gratified Desire”, F&SF, July
Caleb Wilson, “Directions”, Diagram 6.4



The day’s mail

Thu 28 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The last issue of Punk Planet (order) came in — which is always a great read and is incredibly frustrating that it had to stop. There’s a great review of Liz Hand’s Generation Loss (any other music mags want a copy? email us)

“A literary page-turner of impressive thematic heft and cohesion, illuminating surprising insights on the relationship between art and imitation, death and photgraphy, and art and madness.”

Part of the frustration with losing the zine is the ads. There aren’t that many places where you see ads from tiny bands and zines, so this was one way to keep up (interested or not) with what other people are doing out there.

The Privilege of the Sword CoverOk, so. Next exciting thing: the mass market paperback of Ellen Kushner’s The Privilege of the Sword. This is the original mannerpunk Young Trollopian interstitial novel. Katherine’s uncle invites her to live with him in the city. While she envisions dancing the night away the reality is quite different. Ellen’s take on the unexpected ways the adolescent years can take you is quite wonderful. Also, Ellen reports the trade paperback has just gone back to press, which is lovely news. Our hardcover edition is puttering along nicely. Doubt we’ll ever reprint it, but it sure is fun to make books like that.

Lastly, not actually in the mail pile, just finished Nancy Farmer’s brilliant follow up to The Sea of Trolls, The Land of the Silver Apples. More on this book later. Just to say, if you liked the first this one is—without denigrating the first—even better. Farmer enriches the world, folds back unexpected corners of history, and joins threads of stories in the most beautiful and unexpected ways.



Tithe?

Thu 28 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Has anyone seen our copy of Tithe? I could swear it was around here somewhere!



ALA

Tue 26 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Back from the ALA conference in DC which was great. (Also: Ah, Amtrak.)

Librarians are so damned engaged and passionate. They go to this huge shindig not only for the free books and parties, but also for the panels — which were quite formal in their set up and fascinating to see.

  • Red Spikes CoverIt was pointed out by star librarian David Wright that not a ton of libraries have subscriptions to The Believer, McSweeney’s, or indeed many new lit mags. We popped over to the McSweeney‘s/Bomb table soon afterward and there were librarians queueing up to subscribe. Thought = action, baby. (In a sentence that will only make sense to librarians and a few others, LCRW is available through SWETS, by the way.)
  • Exciting books spotted: an appropriately Huge stack of ARCs of Margo Lanagan’s collection, Red Spikes, which just gets better and better the more its read.
  • Other books of interest: The Dud Avocado by Elaine Dundy given to us by someone lovely at the New York Review of Books. (Everyone we have met from there has been lovely, not a coincedence, methinks.) Looks like a great summer read, a fun thing about two young women pottering around Europe in the ’50s. Should go great with a glass of Monkey Bay.
  • Also got a copy of Derrick Jensen’s Thought to Exist in the Wild: Awakening from the Nightmare of Zoos which is full of black and white pictures and thoughtful text and which will be on our gift list to a couple of people
  • Thought to Exist in the Wild: Awakening from the Nightmare of Zoos CoverIf anyone would like to send us all the NYRB books, that too would be lovely.
  • Should you be wandering a book convention and not able to find any good books go find Theo Black and he will lead you.
  • Completely missed (due to not reading the program book, doh!) Scalzi and the VanderMeers and the whole sci-fi contingent.
  • Program book and exhibit book were in fact 2 separate heavy things. Hmm.
  • Stayed at the Watergate Inn and took spy photos. Was too lazy to carry the camera otherwise.
  • DC in June was more like DC in September so we had beautiful walks across the city with friends. (Now we are back in Northampton and someone has draped a hot, wet towel across the whole town, yuck.)
  • Baltimore Library has a great zine library. No, didn’t get there but did meet Miriam DesHarnias and Google says it’s true. They have a great handout for new zine librarians.
  • Witnessed the glory of the book cart drill teams. The Texans won again and we concurred that those librarians knew how to drill with carts.
  • Exotic BirdsChronicle Books have an absolutely great giveaway to go with their book on Florence Broadhurst. If you win this print you must lend it to us. Or at least send us an email syaing, Ha ha!
  • Abby Bass (from awesome Seattle bookshop Bailey/Coy) was one of many librarians who stopped and said hello. Since we are newish to the world of librarian events we are most happy when people lead us around. For which: thank you!

Surely there was more? Yes. But that’s more than enough for today.



    No iPhone here

    Tue 26 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    Good golly it is a pretty thing and we wants it.

    So at first it was about the memory: 4 MB, 8 MB. Not numbers to inspire $600 purchases. These are numbers for keyrings, not intermodular future devices.

    Today comes the monthly price: $60, $80, $100.

    Ah well. Hope someone we know gets one so that we can lean over their shoulder and watch us some fantastic films.



    General update

    Thu 21 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    Added reviews to a bunch of pages. It’s too exciting.

    You have until tomorrow to send in your haiku to win a copy of the new edition of The Solitudes (aka the book previously known as Aegypt) from the Overlook Press. This is one of the best uses of video seen on the net (well, except the blurry text — but we know all about digital cameras being used for video). Ok, maybe not, but it made us laugh. Bonus tip for all the businesses out there, we highly recommend salesforce CRM software, you can manage your customers better and in every business, customers matter.

    Recognize this picture? (Here’s a hint.)

    John Crowley writes about Rosamond Purcell’s awesome new book Bookworm in the Boston Review. (There’s an interesting part on the difficulty of writing about something that the artist writes so well about herself.)

    We’re sending Storyteller back to press, yay! Here are some reviews just added to the site:

    “Its strength, I think, lies in some of the pointers she offers to beginning writers as to help them shorten the time it takes to get published.”– New Pages

    “If you are a budding writer, please spend $16 on this book before raising the money needed to attend Clarion. You’ll get much more out of the workshop if you do.”– Emerald City

    “For such a short book — just barely 192 pages — there is a lot here, and a lot that I’ve never found in other writing books, and it’s all on-point. It’s also delivered as part of the story of one of the most significant institutions in the history of science fiction and fantasy, as told by a true storyteller.”– Green Man Review

    Aren’t the Clarions on at the moment? Hope it’s going well and that all the writers are too busy reading journals to write. Or, the other way round.

    Here’s the Live Book/Gayatri page for the Russian editions of Stranger Things Happen and Magic for Beginners.

    Ed Park on Kim Stanley Robinson’s climate books.

    A certain Japanese multi-level marketing scheme which Gavin was involved in in 1998 has been handed a partial business suspension order by the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry. Nova, one of the larger foreign Japanese language teaching companies, is good for teachers in that they organize the visa and a place to stay. No one ever called them over-friendly on the customer service side. Go students! (Thanks Naoko.)

    131 – US States Renamed For Countries With Similar GDPs

    Say good-bye to Shocklines.com and send Matt a note of thanks while you’re at it. It’s not a reflection on publishing (which we all know is boomin’!), but it is a reflection on how hard it is to organize and sell books, mags, zines, chapbooks, &c. from the small presses. Moment of thought over, bookmark Pulp Source (as well as the usual B&M’s: Atomic, Borderlands, Quimby’s, et al).



    Google book bar

    Thu 21 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    Random wigglings on Google having control of our site. Or, at least, we’ve added Google Book Bar to the front page (down a bit on the left hand side). And if you wait a minute it will change.

    We also use Google Calendar and Kelly has experimented with Google Docs (although not, as Alan DeNiro, is doing, by writing a novel in it).

    Whether we should keep this on the site is a question. Whether in fact we should drop the whole site and leave this up as a self-generating page for the books is also an interesting question.

    We have a pretty basic site which retains much of its 5 year old charm. Cough. Updating it is something we think about but don’t jump at. Companies like Google making these auto-content generating widgets may mean that eventually we won’t have a site. Just a journalling capability to centralize a source of information.

    That journalling capability, i.e. doing the site blog-style, is basically great — since the structure and archiving are built into it — but not one we’re moving to with any real haste. The front/splash page seems important as people go to websites for lots of different reasons and we like the simplicity of it.

    At least for now.



    Happy Locus Privilege News

    Thu 21 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    Ellen Kushner, The Privilege of the SwordOk, we are slow, but very groovy news for Ellen Kushner whose novel The Privilege of the Sword just added to its booty pile a Locus Award. Congrats to all the winners!

    We have signed copies here (shipping is slow over the next week or two, sorry).

    More info on the Awardiness of the Novel:

    Read more



    The Best of LCRW ToC

    Wed 20 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    At last. Seen in the wild this week for the first time as an ARC (will post pictures of its exciting little self if we see it again) this enchanting little tomb, er, tome will be released to the world in late August. Just after the doldrums to be inexact.

    In the meantime, here’s what there’s to be had: some of the best parts of the first 10 years of surprising stories, poetry worth reading, odd bits, and maybe more. Below is the Table of Contents with links to some of the contributor’s pages. Look at all those peeps with livejournals (not a single deadjournal among them) and so on. It’s like the blogospasm has them in its grasp. Not that we would know anything about that. Cough.

    So: The Best of LCRW (with the unofficial subtitle: So Far), bought by the fantastic Mr. Jim Minz at Del Rey and carried on in the best possible way (i.e. not Up the Khyber) by Mr. Fleetwood Robbins and Mr. Christopher Schleup. There are also perhaps other people at Del Rey, like D. Moench, who are working on this. All of them deserve a beer. On us, next time we see you, ok? I thought so!

    The Best of Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet CoverCover by Jacob McMurray
    Preface by Chunterers Max and Mini
    Dan Chaon
    , Introduction (yes, that is a myspace link: friend him!)
    Kelly Link, Travels with the Snow Queen, LCRW 1 (Japanese illo)
    Scotch, An Essay Into A Drink, LCRW 2
    David Findlay, Unrecognizable, LCRW 3
    Ian McDowell,
    mehitobel was queen of the night, LCRW 4
    Nalo Hopkinson, Tan Tan and Dry Bone, LCRW 4
    Margaret Muirhead — An Open Letter, LCRW 4
    Margaret Muirhead, I am glad, LCRW 4
    Margaret Muirhead, Lady Shonagon’s Hateful Things, LCRW 5
    Karen Joy Fowler
    , Heartland, LCRW 6
    What a Difference A Night Makes, LCRW 7
    Ray Vukcevich, Pretending, LCRW 8
    Shh! I can’t hear the music! (LCRW 8)
    William Smith — The Film Column
    Amy Beth Forbes, A is for Apple, LCRW 9
    Shh! I said I was listening to some music! (LCRW 9)
    Mark Rudolph, My Father’s Ghost, LCRW 9
    A list of chickens (From The Fairest Fowl, Portraits of Champion Chickens) (LCRW 9)
    Jeffrey Ford, What’s Sure to Come LCRW 10
    Roadtripping, zinemaking, cooking, cleaning, reading, and eating music (LCRW 10)
    Geoffrey Goodwin — Stoddy Awchaw, LCRW 10 (Listen)
    A selection of teas the LCRW kitchen has acquired or been given over the years (LCRW 10)
    Theodora Goss, Rapid Advance of Sorrow LCRW 11
    Nan Fry, The Wolf’s Story, LCRW 11
    Sarah Monette — Three Letters from the Queen of Elfland, LCRW 11 (prize winner!)
    David Moles
    — Tacoma-Fuji, LCRW 11
    David Erik Nelson — Bay, LCRW 12
    Richard Butner — How to Make a Martini, LCRW 12
    All About the T: Swept (not sweeped) away by the love of irregular verbs (LCRW 12)
    Jan Lars Jensen — Happier Days, LCRW 12
    Philip Raines and Harvey Welles — The Fishie, LCRW 12 (that’s a fun link)
    The Switch. Hope in the form of planted tomatoes (LCRW 12)
    Gwenda Bond — Dear Aunt Gwenda
    William Smith — The Film Column
    David J. Schwartz — The Ichthymancer Writes His Friend with an Account of the Yeti’s Birthday Party, LCRW 13
    A By-No-Means-Complete Joan Aiken Checklist (LCRW 13)
    Veronica Schanoes — Serpents, LCRW 13
    Homeland Security, LCRW 13
    David Blair — Vincent Price; For George Romero, LCRW 13 (First book coming in September!)
    Douglas Lain — Music Lessons, LCRW 14
    James Sallis — Two Stories, LCRW 14
    Karen Russell — Help Wanted, LCRW 15
    Sarah Micklem
    — “Eft” or “Epic”, LCRW 15
    John Kessel — The Red Phone, LCRW 16
    Lawrence Schimel & Sara Rojo, The Well-Dressed Wolf, COMIC
    Deborah Roggie — The Mushroom Duchess
    Seana Graham — The Pirate’s True Love, LCRW 17
    You Could Do This Too, LCRW 17
    Sunshine Ison
    — Two Poems LCRW 18
    [Name Withheld] Article Withdrawn
    Becca De La Rosa — This Is The Train The Queen Rides On LCRW 18
    A selected list of Automobile City/Hwy Mileages (LCRW 18)
    Gwenda Bond — Dear Aunt Gwenda
    John Brown — Bright Waters
    K.E. Duffin, Two Poems LCRW 19
    D.M. Gordon, Sliding LCRW 19
    Cara Spindler & David Erik Nelson, You Were Neither . . . LCRW 19



    Tea!

    Wed 20 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    In Laurie J. Marks’s fabby new novel Water Logic some of the characters have been known to sit around and drink tea. (Although Laurie says she’s more of a coffee drinker!)

    And for those of them that like tea we have, as they say, just the thing: travel tins (1 ounce, that would be 28g) of Evening Escape, a blend of good black teas (with blue cornflower petals for an added dash of color). See attached pics of this morning’s brewery action for more details.

    “And?” you say.

    Send us a link (or mail us a copy) of your review of Water Logic and we’ll send you a tin of the tea (US + Canada only, sorry: unless your review is in The Guardian or something).

    We only have a small number of these left (most have booksellers’ names on them!) but we’ll wait around and send them in a week or two to give people a chance to get their reviews out there.

    Early reviews are coming in (no cribbing, naughty tea drinker!):

    Frankly, it’s mind-bending stuff, and refreshing…. I haven’t read the previous two Logic books by Marks so this was like a flashback to my childhood. Interestingly, while there was some character history that I missed, from what I’ve seen of Marks’ writing style, I didn’t necessarily miss much explanation anyways. The world is presented as-is, and of course all the people in it know what is going on and why. I found the book quite intriguing, since Marks does have some unusual magic going on, and there’s certainly no overkill in the infodump department.
    —James Schellenberg, The Cultural Gutter

    * How gifts from the past, often unknown or unacknowledged, bless future generations; how things that look like disasters or mistakes may be parts of a much bigger pattern that produces greater, farther-reaching good results—such is the theme of Marks’ sweeping fantasy, which reaches its third volume with this successor to Fire Logic (2002) and Earth Logic (2004).
    Booklist (Starred Review)



    Punk Planet: RIP

    Mon 18 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    In the office for a couple of days (with a KGB visit interstitialed in there on Wednesday) before heading to DC for ALA on Friday (say hi if you’re there). Acronymed to death, anyone?

    Punk Planet just pulled the plug on it’s zine, bah fkn humbug. It was a great fun mag with good pieces on all aspects of indie culture. Another death-by-distributor tale. Best of luck with the books!

    These are pretty desperate times for indie culture. It’s (somewhat) easy enough to start something—we did it while knowing nothing. Keeping it going while being, er, nibbled to death by ducks? Not always easy.

    The usual “clarion” call: if you like a zine, subscribe. Shop the McSweeney’s and Soft Skull sales.

    But don’t wait until a press or bookshop you like is desperate. If you buy this $14.95 book from Amazon for 32% off:

    The Best of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet (Paperback)
    by Kelly Link & Gavin J. Grant


    List Price $14.95
    Price $10.17
    You Save $4.78 (32%)

    That’s great! You only pay $10.71 (Hey, buy 2.) But that 32% you’re saving doesn’t come from Amazon: that cut is from the publisher. The publisher still has to give Amazon a huge discount (so that they can pass it on — and not selling on Amazon, well, let’s suppose that argument is over already) and pay all the other usual people. Hello printer!

    How about if you buy that same book at your local book store (which probably has a frequent buyer card of some kind to offer you 10% off)? Then that 22-32% goes back to the bookshop (paying smart people in your town to sell books: how cool is that?) and a slice of it goes back to the publisher, who need every % they can get.

    Every dollar is a political act.

    More LCRW stuff:

    We will post the Best of LCRW table of contents soon. Promise!

    Submissions are running about 1,500 per year. So we are falling further behind and wow are they piling up. Not sure what we can do. Reading periods? Charge to submit? (That is a joke, by the way.) 1500 stories a year (and only going to rise) is a chunk of time. Suggestions appreciated.



    Tue 5 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 5 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

    Catching up again (before disappearing, again):

    • Jack’s posts from a trip to China are excellent
    • Generation Loss gets a good review in the Boston Globe:

    “Highly recommended for the reader who yearns for something more complex and literary with a touch of goth.”

    Liz and Ron Hogan of Galleycat pictured to the right. Tons of his pics here. We did not take so many, er, any, pics. Liz signed a ton of books, did a reading in a spot with terrible acoustics (but she sounded [and looked] great doing it), and generally charmed booksellers and everyone else she met.

    • Bill Sheehan wrote a wonderful review of Endless Things for the Washington Post Book World. The cover, blown up to 2′ x 3′ stopped people dead in their tracks (so messy, all those corpses) at BEA and there were more than a few people wailing with happiness about the publication of the last Aegypt book.

    Endless Things is the fourth and last installment in a vast, intricate series of novels collectively entitled “Aegypt.” The series (which is really one long novel) began in 1987 with the publication of Aegypt (soon to be reissued as The Solitudes) and was followed by Love & Sleep (1994) and Daemonomania (2000). It was clear from the start that Crowley was on to something special, and the appearance of this final volume confirms that impression. In its entirety, “Aegypt” stands as one of the most distinctive accomplishments of recent decades. It is a work of great erudition and deep humanity that is as beautifully composed as any novel in my experience.”

    Note: Overlook Press begins publishing the series in paperback in autumn with the publication of The Solitudes—and we know this for sure because we picked up a copy at BEA.

    Here’s an interview with John from May 2006 about the book—and it’s published just a year later.

    • It’s true, there is a new LCRW and we will get it mailed out this week. Quick, someone send us a couple of cases of chocolate bars!Also, there is a cover for autumn’s The Best of LCRW (not final, so don’t quote it!). Taken from Jacob MacMurray’s journal.

    “It draws on standard fantasy and horror ideas – zombies, fairies, etc but, trust me, it’s like nothing you’ve ever read. Blackly funny. Wildly inventive. Utterly insane.”

    Best American Fantasy gets a review on NPR: listen to a minute of Kelly reading “Origin Story” or read it.

    Stranger Things Happen slips into New York’s “The Best Novels You’ve Never Read”:

    “A book that could be shelved under several genres—horror, fantasy, literary fiction—it suffers from the limited ways in which we think about literature.”
    —David Orr, Times Book Review

    That’s a pretty good book list. If only the stack weren’t quite so high. Lists or pics may follow.

    • Posted a very few WisCon pics.
    • Again with the rec for Hang Fire Books blog — for the writing on buying books and the scans (wistful Ohio girl, Bambi, pizza platter remote control planes).

     

     Have to change the CSS on this thing as it just looks grotesque at the moment. One day soon.



    Tue 5 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    Catching up again (before disappearing, again):

    • Jack’s posts from a trip to China are excellent
    • Generation Loss gets a good review in the Boston Globe:

    “Highly recommended for the reader who yearns for something more complex and literary with a touch of goth.”

    Liz and Ron Hogan of Galleycat pictured to the right. Tons of his pics here. We did not take so many, er, any, pics. Liz signed a ton of books, did a reading in a spot with terrible acoustics (but she sounded [and looked] great doing it), and generally charmed booksellers and everyone else she met.

    • Bill Sheehan wrote a wonderful review of Endless Things for the Washington Post Book World. The cover, blown up to 2′ x 3′ stopped people dead in their tracks (so messy, all those corpses) at BEA and there were more than a few people wailing with happiness about the publication of the last Aegypt book.

    Endless Things is the fourth and last installment in a vast, intricate series of novels collectively entitled “Aegypt.” The series (which is really one long novel) began in 1987 with the publication of Aegypt (soon to be reissued as The Solitudes) and was followed by Love & Sleep (1994) and Daemonomania (2000). It was clear from the start that Crowley was on to something special, and the appearance of this final volume confirms that impression. In its entirety, “Aegypt” stands as one of the most distinctive accomplishments of recent decades. It is a work of great erudition and deep humanity that is as beautifully composed as any novel in my experience.”

    Note: Overlook Press begins publishing the series in paperback in autumn with the publication of The Solitudes—and we know this for sure because we picked up a copy at BEA.

    Here’s an interview with John from May 2006 about the book—and it’s published just a year later.

    • It’s true, there is a new LCRW and we will get it mailed out this week. Quick, someone send us a couple of cases of chocolate bars!Also, there is a cover for autumn’s The Best of LCRW (not final, so don’t quote it!). Taken from Jacob MacMurray’s journal.

    “It draws on standard fantasy and horror ideas – zombies, fairies, etc but, trust me, it’s like nothing you’ve ever read. Blackly funny. Wildly inventive. Utterly insane.”

    Best American Fantasy gets a review on NPR: listen to a minute of Kelly reading “Origin Story” or read it.

    Stranger Things Happen slips into New York’s “The Best Novels You’ve Never Read”:

    “A book that could be shelved under several genres—horror, fantasy, literary fiction—it suffers from the limited ways in which we think about literature.”
    —David Orr, Times Book Review

    That’s a pretty good book list. If only the stack weren’t quite so high. Lists or pics may follow.

    • Posted a very few WisCon pics.
    • Again with the rec for Hang Fire Books blog — for the writing on buying books and the scans (wistful Ohio girl, Bambi, pizza platter remote control planes).

     

     Have to change the CSS on this thing as it just looks grotesque at the moment. One day soon.



    Lady Churchill’s Robot* Wristlet No. 20

    Tue 5 Jun 2007 - Filed under: LCRW | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    Available as an ebook from Weightless Books.

    $5 · Approximately 30 sheets of paper, printed on each side and folded making 30 pages of Good Stuff all in glorious technicolor black & white.
    “A winning blend of fiction, non-fiction and poetry, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet specializes in professionalism and never, ever takes no for an answer. It’s a confident collection that wears its pretensions on its sleeve and yet somehow, never manages to get all exclusionary in its approach. Gavin J. Grant and Kelly Link head up this litzine and in doing so, feature the work from close to two dozen contributors, all with a serious creative bent and credentials to match. Most of the material is pretty insular and you’ll get a pretty good flavour for each author if you allow yourself a couple of re-reads per selection. Luckily, with so much choice and a good range of styles on hand, you’re bound to find at least one contribution that’ll push your buttons and/or turn your crank. For me, that would be Rose Black’s The Secretary, a brief, real life glimpse at the autopsy of a mother’s desk and all the hopes and secrets that once lived inside. Not really sure why I found this so affecting, but perhaps it was the blunt, no BS style in which the piece was written. And there was plenty of other goodness within, all tastefully bound with a couple of well-placed staples and a nifty brownish, beige cover featuring a nuclear active robot.”
    —Cameron Gordon, Broken Pencil

    masthead
    Made in the Spring of 2007 by:
    Gavin J. Grant · Kelly Link
    Jedediah Berry · Michael Deluca · Heidi Smith · Lauren Smith · Caitlin Beck

    fiction
    Marly Youmans — Prolegomenon to the Adventures of Childe Phoenix
    Anil Menon — Invisible Hand
    Edward McEneely — Consider the Snorklepine
    Steven Bratman — Under the Skin
    Michael Hartford — The Oologist’s Cabinet
    M. Brock Moorer — The Third Kind of Darkness
    Laura Evans — Workshop
    Amelia Beamer — Krishnaware
    Meghan McCarron — I’ll Give In
    Jon Hansen — In the Lobby of the Mission Palms
    Karen Joy Fowler — The Last Worders

    poetry
    Neile Graham — The Tattoos I Don’t Have
    Neile Graham — Westness Walk
    Rose Black — The Secretary
    David Blair — Five Poems

    nonfiction
    Gwenda Bond — Dear Aunt Gwenda
    William Smith — Eleven Things

    cover art
    Nathaniel Meyer

    Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, No.20 June 2007. ISSN 1544-7782 Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996 LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press, 150 Pleasant St., #306, Easthampton, MA 01027· [email protected] · smallbeerpress.com/lcrw $5 per single issue or $20/4. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Sometimes our responses are slower than others, sorry. Please change the world for the better today. Thanks for reading.

    The 20 of Robots is a card in our new tarot set (to be released in a couple of years once we work out what kind of set has a 20 in it). Printed by Paradise Copies, 21 Conz Street, Northampton, MA 01060 413-585-0414

    * A rose is a rose by any other tablature.



    Water Logic

    Fri 1 Jun 2007 - Filed under: Books | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

    May 2017: Laurie is revising Air Logic and we are scheduling the reprint paperbacks of Fire Logic and Earth Logic for later this year.

    March 2014: We don’t have any update yet on Air Logic. But, we have seen a very early draft of the manuscript. Once it is finished and actually delivered to us, there will be at least one round of editing and then we’ll get the book out as fast as we can. We love these books and are so glad that there are so many readers out there, just like us, waiting!


    trade paper · 9781931520232 | ebook · 9781618730121
    Elemental Logic: Book 3

    Laurie J. Marks’s third novel in her ground-breaking and award-winning Elemental Logic series (following Fire Logic and Earth Logic ) is a triumph of politics, fantasy, world-building, and intelligent design: of character, world, and magic.

    Amid assassinations, rebellions, and the pyres of too many dead, a new government forms in the land of Shaftal—a government of soldiers and farmers, scholars and elemental talents, all weary of war and longing for peace. But some cannot forget their losses, and some cannot imagine a place for themselves in an enemy land. Before memory, before recorded history, something happened that now must be remembered. Zanja na’Tarwein, the crosser of boundaries, born in fire and wedded to earth, has fallen under the ice. Now, by water logic, the logic of patterns repeated, of laughter and music, the lost must be found—or the found may forever be lost.

    By water logic, a cow doctor becomes a politician. A soldier becomes a flower farmer. A lost book contains a lost future. The patterns of history are made and unmade.

    Read the first chapter.

    Listen to the author read Chapter 1: part 1 · part 2

    Reviews

    “Frankly, it’s mind-bending stuff, and refreshing.”
    —James Schellenberg, The Cultural Gutter

    * “How gifts from the past, often unknown or unacknowledged, bless future generations; how things that look like disasters or mistakes may be parts of a much bigger pattern that produces greater, farther-reaching good results.”
    Booklist (Starred Review)

    “Finely drawn characters and a lack of bias toward sexual orientation make this a thoughtful, challenging read.”
    Library Journal

    “Marks’s characters are real people who breathe and sleep and sweat and love; the food has flavor and the landscape can break your heart. You don’t find this often in any contemporary fiction, much less in fantasy: a world you can plunge yourself into utterly and live in with great delight, while the pages turn, and dream of after.”—Ellen Kushner

    “Marks plays the fantasy of her unfolding epic more subtly here than in previous volumes, and the resulting depiction of intransigent cultures in conflict, rich with insight into human nature and motives, will resonate for modern readers.”—Publishers Weekly

    Map of ShaftalMap of Shaftal by Jeanne Gomoll:

    On the web:

    Marks was a Guest of Honor at the WisCon convention in Madison, WI.

    Laurie is at work on the fourth book in the series and we are very much looking forward to it.

    Credits

    • Cover image © Corbis. Download cover for print with right click on mouse.
    • Author photo © Deb Mensinger.
    • Map of Shaftal © by Jeanne Gomoll.