Interfictions Giveaway

Mon 30 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 21 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

InterfictionsToday is Publication Day for the Interstitial Arts Foundation’s first anthology Interfictions.

It’s out there in stores (even if the final cover hasn’t fully percolated through the digital update filters yet), being reviewed a story at a time by contributor(!) Michael DeLuca, and has its own blog.

To celebrate we have are giving away 2 things:

  • a space in between
  • and, a couple of copies of the anthology

5 individual copies of the anthology will be sent to readers anywhere in the world (some may be sent slower than others) who will do at least one of the following things:

  • Reply quite fast to this post
  • Review the book online or in print
  • Interview any of the contributors
  • Point us (in the comments) towards art they find interstitial.

Best of luck!


Flashback: here are a couple of pieces that the editors wrote before they put the antho together—

An Introduction to Interstitial Arts: Life on the Border
by Delia Sherman

Book01 by Mark WagnerBorders are interesting places. As debatable land, sometimes wasteland or wilderness, they can be dangerous places to visit or live in, but they are never boring. Even when a long period of peace and stability removes some of their dangerous glamour, they’re still (literally) edgy, different in essential ways from the countries they mediate.

Crossing Borders, by Night
Theodora Goss

When I was a child, I traveled with my grandmother across the border between Hungary and Czechoslovakia. In those days, all the borders behind the Iron Curtain were closed. As we approached the border, a guard came into our train compartment to check our travel papers and search our luggage. He also searched my grandmother’s purse, spilling its contents into her lap, feeling the lining.



Interfictions: An Anthology of Interstitial Writing

Mon 30 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Books | 2 Comments| Posted by: intern

Interfictions is the first book from the Interstitial Arts Foundation. The cover features a photo of 3D art by Connie Toebe. The table of contents below is alphabetical. Check out the second volume.

A version of the Introduction is online and the Afterword, by the editors Delia Sherman and Theodora Goss — a great conversation on expectations, editing, definitions (and the lack or use of them) — is posted (in slightly edited form) here.

Table of Contents

Heinz Insu Fenkl, Introduction
Karen Jordan Allen, “Alternate Anxieties”
Christopher Barzak, “What We Know About the Lost Families of —— House”
K. Tempest Bradford, “Black Feather”
Matthew Cheney, “A Map of the Everywhere”
Michael DeLuca, “The Utter Proximity of God”
Adrián Ferrero, “When It Rains, You’d Better Get Out of Ulga” (translated from the Spanish by Edo Mor)
Colin Greenland, “Timothy”
Csilla Kleinheincz, “A Drop of Raspberry” (translated from the Hungarian by Noémi Szelényi)
Holly Phillips, “Queen of the Butterfly Kingdom”
Rachel Pollack, “Burning Beard: The Dreams and Visions of Joseph Ben Jacob, Lord Viceroy of Egypt”
Joy Remy, “Pallas at Noon”
Anna Tambour, “The Shoe in SHOES’ Window”
Veronica Schanoes, “Rats”
Léa Silhol, “Emblemata” (translated from the French by Sarah Smith)
Jon Singer, “Willow Pattern”
Vandana Singh, “Hunger”
Mikal Trimm, “Climbing Redemption Mountain”
Catherynne Valente, “A Dirge for Prester John”
Leslie What, “Post hoc”
Delia Sherman and Theodora Goss, “Afterword: The Space Between

Read more about our authors here.

Would you like a desk or examination copy? Read this.

Reviews

“Odd, Deep, Delightful”– Michael Bishop, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“We want words to do more now and for our time not to have been spent with just one idea.”– Adrienne Martini, Baltimore City Paper

More

On the web:

Credits

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Interfictions : an anthology of interstitial writing / edited by Delia Sherman & Theodora Goss.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-1-931520-24-9 (trade paper : alk. paper)
1. Fiction–Collections. I. Sherman, Delia. II. Goss, Theodora.
PN6120.2.I47 2007
808.83’1–dc22
2007002129

 

Interstitial Arts


O.King’s “The Cure”

Sat 28 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The new issue of One Story came in the mail which reminded us of how much we had enjoyed the previous one:

Issue #85, December 20, 2006 The Cure” by Owen King

Don’t go read the interview if you haven’t read the story. But, go read the story if you haven’t read the interview.

Who will like this? Barb, I think.



Alan DeNiro in the house

Sat 28 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Literally. If you have any questions for Alan (for an interview we’re going to do), email us! Alan’s on a panel this afternoon and then reading tonight at the UMass Amherst Juniper Literary Festival:

2:15-3:15 PM Roundtable Discussion: Weird War: Politics & the Politics of Whimsy (at Emily Dickinson Homestead): investigating the relationship between world events and various literary responses to them, from the overt championing of a particular cause to the less explicit approaches of lyric, personal history, and invented parallel worlds; with Chris Bachelder, Alan DeNiro, Paul Fattaruso, Sabrina Orah Mark, Eugene Ostashevsky, & Matthew Zapruder

7:30 PM Poetry & Fiction Reading with Eric Baus, Lucy Corin, Alan DeNiro, Julia Johnson, Sabrina Orah Mark, Eugene Ostashevsky, Imad Rahman, Michael Robins & Shauna Seliy at University of Massachusetts’ Memorial Hall

We went to the opening reading last night where Rachel Sherman read a hilarious story (that Alan says was published in n+1) that occasionally required her to read in the voice of “The Reaper”—not the reaper you’re thinking of. 6 good readers (none of whom went too far over time!), beer + cookies = fun night.



Sat 28 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Ironside: A Modern Faery's Tale CoverHolly Black has brought us screaming into 2002 by creating a live journal feed for this thing. We tried to name it lcrw but it declared autonomy, packed up all its old cassettes and vinyl, moved out, and hung its own shingle under the name

smallbeer_rss

At some point (soonish?) that may be added to the feed syndicate (because we are all always hungry and we believe in the syndicate and that they are good. Good). Livejournal seems to require posts to have titles in a way that other blog syndicates don’t. A tithe we pay to the syndicate in good grace.

Thanks Holly!

Holly is about to take a landyacht (or maybe she will valiantly brave the Friendly Skies and take the Aeriobehometh) for the west coast where she (and Cassandra Clare) will visit (and share vast quantities of Arabian Wine with) purveyors of bookth.



Sat 28 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Ironside: A Modern Faery's Tale CoverHolly Black has brought us screaming into 2002 by creating a live journal feed for this thing. We tried to name it lcrw but it declared autonomy, packed up all its old cassettes and vinyl, moved out, and hung its own shingle under the name

smallbeer_rss

At some point (soonish?) that may be added to the feed syndicate (because we are all always hungry and we believe in the syndicate and that they are good. Good). Livejournal seems to require posts to have titles in a way that other blog syndicates don’t. A tithe we pay to the syndicate in good grace.

Thanks Holly!

Holly is about to take a landyacht (or maybe she will valiantly brave the Friendly Skies and take the Aeriobehometh) for the west coast where she (and Cassandra Clare) will visit (and share vast quantities of Arabian Wine with) purveyors of bookth.



Thu 26 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

John Crowley’s novel, Endless Things, is out soon. We’ve received some office copies and mailed them out (signed, because John was nice enough to come by and sign some) to everyone (tons and tons!) who pre-ordered it. We’ve heard from people who have bought it from stores but we’d be grateful to anyone who sends a pic of one out there in der wild.

John had some news from his recent trip to Kyiv (as we learn we are now to spell the city previously known as Kiev):

I suppose I should first announce that I am the recipient of the first ever Bulgakov Award of PORTAL, the Ukrainian science fiction and fantasy convention/conference. Bulgakov (raise your hand if you didn’t know this) is Ukrainian, born and died in Kyiv, where a museum about him now occupies the house that was his childhood home and the place he died.  Though he wrote in Russian, and though his masterpiece The Master and Maragarita is set in a lovingly detailed Moscow, the Ukrainians consider him their own.  So do I, now.

John hasn’t posted all his pics yet, but he did post these:

The Bulgakov Award, in addition to being an honor, also consisted of an object — a huge sculpture of a black cat (Behemoth, as readers of Bulgakov will remember), weighing at least ten pounds.  Great jokesters, these Ukrainians, as they have had to be, and funny certainly but bad to let their Visiting Author believe (even briefly) that he would have to wrestle this monstrous beast onto three different flights home.  Picture of self with Behemoth laughing hysterically (self; cat remains as always calm) will soon be posted.



Thu 26 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

John Crowley’s novel, Endless Things, is out soon. We’ve received some office copies and mailed them out (signed, because John was nice enough to come by and sign some) to everyone (tons and tons!) who pre-ordered it. We’ve heard from people who have bought it from stores but we’d be grateful to anyone who sends a pic of one out there in der wild.

John had some news from his recent trip to Kyiv (as we learn we are now to spell the city previously known as Kiev):

I suppose I should first announce that I am the recipient of the first ever Bulgakov Award of PORTAL, the Ukrainian science fiction and fantasy convention/conference. Bulgakov (raise your hand if you didn’t know this) is Ukrainian, born and died in Kyiv, where a museum about him now occupies the house that was his childhood home and the place he died.  Though he wrote in Russian, and though his masterpiece The Master and Maragarita is set in a lovingly detailed Moscow, the Ukrainians consider him their own.  So do I, now.

John hasn’t posted all his pics yet, but he did post these:

The Bulgakov Award, in addition to being an honor, also consisted of an object — a huge sculpture of a black cat (Behemoth, as readers of Bulgakov will remember), weighing at least ten pounds.  Great jokesters, these Ukrainians, as they have had to be, and funny certainly but bad to let their Visiting Author believe (even briefly) that he would have to wrestle this monstrous beast onto three different flights home.  Picture of self with Behemoth laughing hysterically (self; cat remains as always calm) will soon be posted.



Thu 26 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Lit-Cast, an audio journal of literature, has posted Kelly’s part of a panel from an AWP panel on Fairy Tales, moderated by Kate Bernheimer. Listen here.



Thu 26 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Lit-Cast, an audio journal of literature, has posted Kelly’s part of a panel from an AWP panel on Fairy Tales, moderated by Kate Bernheimer. Listen here.



Wed 25 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

A week or two ago we asked our punk queen Liz Hand how’s the weather in Maine? She sent pix. Looks peaceful. Maybe some snow on the ground:

http://lcrw.net/images/people/handelizabeth3-72.gif

Then she spooked us with her I.C.U. hand (I see you—see novel for full spookiness of this pic) and the lobster about to give her the head-bitey:

The image “http://lcrw.net/images/people/handelizabeth2-72.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

So, uh, maybe we’ll delay that trip to Maine.

Yes, Liz lives up there and we could visit and those among us who are tempted could take revenge upon the head-biting lobsters. Sure, Clute is there, too, and we could talk about The Darkening Garden — eek, more horror!

Not going! Not even to Liz’s reading at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick on what’s supposed to be a nice (“nice”, ha!) Saturday afternoon in May (der 5th). So we’ll bring her down here to Northampton instead. A grand plan!

The group mind is made up. We do not have to go to Maine!

Hmm. At least until summer, when another trip to Stone Coast is on the calendar. Eek!



Wed 25 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

A week or two ago we asked our punk queen Liz Hand how’s the weather in Maine? She sent pix. Looks peaceful. Maybe some snow on the ground:

http://lcrw.net/images/people/handelizabeth3-72.gif

Then she spooked us with her I.C.U. hand (I see you—see novel for full spookiness of this pic) and the lobster about to give her the head-bitey:

The image “http://lcrw.net/images/people/handelizabeth2-72.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

So, uh, maybe we’ll delay that trip to Maine.

Yes, Liz lives up there and we could visit and those among us who are tempted could take revenge upon the head-biting lobsters. Sure, Clute is there, too, and we could talk about The Darkening Garden — eek, more horror!

Not going! Not even to Liz’s reading at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick on what’s supposed to be a nice (“nice”, ha!) Saturday afternoon in May (der 5th). So we’ll bring her down here to Northampton instead. A grand plan!

The group mind is made up. We do not have to go to Maine!

Hmm. At least until summer, when another trip to Stone Coast is on the calendar. Eek!



Wed 25 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Liz Hand on music for Generation Loss at

 Generation Loss has a lot of autobiographical elements in it. Cass Neary, the novel’s screwed-up, tattooed speedfreak protagonist, is essentially me if my brakes had been cut in 1977. As the Shangri-Las put it in “Great Big Kiss,” “She’s good bad, but she ain’t evil.”

more more more



Wed 25 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Liz Hand on music for Generation Loss at

 Generation Loss has a lot of autobiographical elements in it. Cass Neary, the novel’s screwed-up, tattooed speedfreak protagonist, is essentially me if my brakes had been cut in 1977. As the Shangri-Las put it in “Great Big Kiss,” “She’s good bad, but she ain’t evil.”

more more more



Tue 24 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sybil wants you.

Sybil’s Garage No. 4 Spring is here, the weather is warm, but don’t forget! It’s your last chance to get Sybil’s Garage at the discounted rate. This discount expires on May 1st. Follow this link now and get 20% off Sybil’s Garage No. 4

Look: it’s pretty (colorrrrr), comes with a free chapbook, and has an interview with Jeff “NO BS” Ford, as well as a whole bunch of prose and poems by peeps you like. You. Pretty! Buy!

Right, that’s done and their sales will be through the roof. Next?

Wait, it this mic still on? Crap.



Tue 24 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sybil wants you.

Sybil’s Garage No. 4 Spring is here, the weather is warm, but don’t forget! It’s your last chance to get Sybil’s Garage at the discounted rate. This discount expires on May 1st. Follow this link now and get 20% off Sybil’s Garage No. 4

Look: it’s pretty (colorrrrr), comes with a free chapbook, and has an interview with Jeff “NO BS” Ford, as well as a whole bunch of prose and poems by peeps you like. You. Pretty! Buy!

Right, that’s done and their sales will be through the roof. Next?

Wait, it this mic still on? Crap.



Mon 23 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

A couple of years ago we were lucky enough to be substituted on for Terri Windling as center-forwards in St. Martin’s Press’s Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror annual extravaganza. We don’t pretend to have Terri’s skill and agility — or her way with words and ability to find great work in the most unexpected quarters — and we always point out it took two of us to do what she was doing. And we struggle. (Mightily!)

We’ve finished the new volume, The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror 2007: 20th Annual Collection (the copyedited ms is due this week and once that last poem is tied up we’ll post the full table of contents) and to celebrate we’ll be posting the introductory summations from previous volumes.

The Year's best Fantasy & Horror 17Here, since Ellen has already posted hers, are the summarys from the first volume we worked on, The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror: Seventeen:



Mon 23 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

A couple of years ago we were lucky enough to be substituted on for Terri Windling as center-forwards in St. Martin’s Press’s Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror annual extravaganza. We don’t pretend to have Terri’s skill and agility — or her way with words and ability to find great work in the most unexpected quarters — and we always point out it took two of us to do what she was doing. And we struggle. (Mightily!)

We’ve finished the new volume, The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror 2007: 20th Annual Collection (the copyedited ms is due this week and once that last poem is tied up we’ll post the full table of contents) and to celebrate we’ll be posting the introductory summations from previous volumes.

The Year's best Fantasy & Horror 17Here, since Ellen has already posted hers, are the summarys from the first volume we worked on, The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror: Seventeen:



Mon 23 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

International Pixel-Stained Technopeasant Day?

Arr, we lives this way, we does.

Generation Loss
Elizabeth Hand

There’s always a moment where everything changes. A great photographer — someone like Diane Arbus, or me during that fraction of a second when I was great — she sees that moment coming, and presses the shutter release an instant before the change hits.

Storyteller
Kate Wilhelm

  1. Can Writing Be Taught?
  2. Trivia Vs. Writing Real Stories now available at the Online Writing Workshop.
  3. My Silent Partner at SF Site.

Family Reunion: an 8-page mini-comic by Sean Stewart and Steve Lieberbased on Perfect Circle.

Travel Light
Naomi Mitchison

It is said that when the new Queen saw the old Queen’s baby daughter, she told the King that the brat must be got rid of at once. And the King, who by now had almost forgotten the old Queen and had scarcely looked at the baby, agreed and thought no more about it. And that would have been the end of that baby girl, but that her nurse, Matulli, came to hear of it. Now this nurse was from Finmark, and, like many another from thereabouts, was apt to take on the shape of an animal from time to time. So she turned herself into a black bear then and there and picked up the baby in her mouth, blanket and all, and growled her way out of the Bower at the back of the King’s hall, and padded out through the light spring snow that had melted already near the hall, and through the birch woods and the pine woods into the deep dark woods where the rest of the bears were waking up from their winter sleep.

The Faery Handbag
Kelly Link
“I used to go to thrift stores with my friends. We’d take the train into Boston, and go to The Garment District, which is this huge vintage clothing warehouse. Everything is arranged by color, and somehow that makes all of the clothes beautiful.”

Carmen Dog
Carol Emshwiller
“The beast changes to a woman or the woman changes to a beast,” the doctor says. “In her case it is certainly the latter since she has been, on the whole, quite passable as a human being up to the present moment. There may be hundreds of these creatures already among us. No way to tell for sure how many.”

Sally Harpe
Christopher Rowe
They tell this one in those tobacco towns along the Green River.

The End of a Dynasty
Angelica Gorodischer
Translated by Ursula K. Le Guin
The storyteller said: He was a sorrowful prince, young Livna’lams, seven years old and full of sorrow.

From Trampoline:

Foreigners
Mark Rich
Release came not as I expected — burdened with fines, restrictions, armed guard, and list of warnings longer than my conscience.

Other Agents
Richard Butner
“1985 sure is dark,” Nick said, and another 100 watt bulb popped gently in his hands. “It’s a good thing we have these protective gauntlets.” Nick waggled his hands and scattered shards of glass on the bedspread.

Whisper
Ray Vukcevich:And then she fired her parting shot. “And not only that,” she said, as if “that” hadn’t been quite enough, “you snore horribly!”Perpetual Motion
Dora Knez
Malfi arrived in the middle toilet stall of the men’s room. The Saurians had chosen it as the best way of concealing him initially, though it was not ideal.

Because we want to. Because giving stuff away doesn’t take anything away from us. Because often we have been too poor to buy books so we read from the library, or used copies. We still do. Because we can. Why the hell not? (Rants not accepted as reasons.)



Mon 23 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

International Pixel-Stained Technopeasant Day?

Arr, we lives this way, we does.

Generation Loss
Elizabeth Hand

There’s always a moment where everything changes. A great photographer — someone like Diane Arbus, or me during that fraction of a second when I was great — she sees that moment coming, and presses the shutter release an instant before the change hits.

Storyteller
Kate Wilhelm

  1. Can Writing Be Taught?
  2. Trivia Vs. Writing Real Stories now available at the Online Writing Workshop.
  3. My Silent Partner at SF Site.

Family Reunion: an 8-page mini-comic by Sean Stewart and Steve Lieberbased on Perfect Circle.

Travel Light
Naomi Mitchison

It is said that when the new Queen saw the old Queen’s baby daughter, she told the King that the brat must be got rid of at once. And the King, who by now had almost forgotten the old Queen and had scarcely looked at the baby, agreed and thought no more about it. And that would have been the end of that baby girl, but that her nurse, Matulli, came to hear of it. Now this nurse was from Finmark, and, like many another from thereabouts, was apt to take on the shape of an animal from time to time. So she turned herself into a black bear then and there and picked up the baby in her mouth, blanket and all, and growled her way out of the Bower at the back of the King’s hall, and padded out through the light spring snow that had melted already near the hall, and through the birch woods and the pine woods into the deep dark woods where the rest of the bears were waking up from their winter sleep.

The Faery Handbag
Kelly Link
“I used to go to thrift stores with my friends. We’d take the train into Boston, and go to The Garment District, which is this huge vintage clothing warehouse. Everything is arranged by color, and somehow that makes all of the clothes beautiful.”

Carmen Dog
Carol Emshwiller
“The beast changes to a woman or the woman changes to a beast,” the doctor says. “In her case it is certainly the latter since she has been, on the whole, quite passable as a human being up to the present moment. There may be hundreds of these creatures already among us. No way to tell for sure how many.”

Sally Harpe
Christopher Rowe
They tell this one in those tobacco towns along the Green River.

The End of a Dynasty
Angelica Gorodischer
Translated by Ursula K. Le Guin
The storyteller said: He was a sorrowful prince, young Livna’lams, seven years old and full of sorrow.

From Trampoline:

Foreigners
Mark Rich
Release came not as I expected — burdened with fines, restrictions, armed guard, and list of warnings longer than my conscience.

Other Agents
Richard Butner
“1985 sure is dark,” Nick said, and another 100 watt bulb popped gently in his hands. “It’s a good thing we have these protective gauntlets.” Nick waggled his hands and scattered shards of glass on the bedspread.

Whisper
Ray Vukcevich:And then she fired her parting shot. “And not only that,” she said, as if “that” hadn’t been quite enough, “you snore horribly!”Perpetual Motion
Dora Knez
Malfi arrived in the middle toilet stall of the men’s room. The Saurians had chosen it as the best way of concealing him initially, though it was not ideal.

Because we want to. Because giving stuff away doesn’t take anything away from us. Because often we have been too poor to buy books so we read from the library, or used copies. We still do. Because we can. Why the hell not? (Rants not accepted as reasons.)



Fri 20 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Julie Phillips pointed us toward this page of Alice Sheldon’s paintings.



Fri 20 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Julie Phillips pointed us toward this page of Alice Sheldon’s paintings.



Liz Hand on air

Thu 19 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Inaugerating our podcastery thingie (which can be subscribed to here) is Liz Hand who recorded an awesome reading of the first couple of chapters of Generation Loss. Check out that voice!http://www.elizabethhand.com/2007/gen_loss.mp3



Thu 19 Apr 2007 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

John Scalzi (whose cup runneth over with SFWA madness) posted Marillion’s “Kayleigh” for a friend’s birthday. Which is a beautiful song and explains the popularity of the name Kayleigh in the 20-22 year old female demographic. Scalzi takes issue with Fish’s hair—with good reason. It is indefensible. But from what I remember, Edinburgh in the 1980s had no hairstylists: they’d all moved to Glasgow following the success of Simple Minds.

So here’s a response, another Marillion video, “Garden Party”. The video has a strange and lovely narrative: Fish and the boys are Just William-esque schoolboy agents of chaos running around the edges of a garden party and tiptoeing into Lord of the Flies or The Wicker Man territory:



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