Next week: Italy

Thu 30 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Kelly Link will be at a couple of book festivals in Italy next week thanks to the good people at Donzelli editore — who published Stranger Things Happen in Italian — and the American Embassy there.
But, first, on the morning of Dec. 7th she will teach a class at the SCUOLA HOLDEN (yes, named after that Holden). Then she will read at 18 (6 PM) at the Atrium in Piazza Solferino.

On the 9th at 16 (4 PM) she will read at the Rome Book Fair, being introduced by Riccardo Duranti, her translator, and Alessandro Portelli, a leading Italian scholar of American Literature.

Invites to the readings are below! Wish us luck. It will be scattered showers all week, but we don’t care as it will be 60 degrees and We Will Be in Italy!

Earlier we mentioned that we’d post some PDFs of an interview piece with Kelly from an Italian magazine. At last here they are. Go see for the fabby art. They’re large-ish files but can be downloaded here: Contents page, title page, interview1, interview2.
The image “http://www.lcrw.net/images/Link_Roma.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
http://www.lcrw.net/images/Link_Torino.jpg



Thu 30 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Just posted a new newsletter. Which contains secrets. It starts like this:

First: Happy St. Andrew’s Day! Get your kilt on, your flask filled, find a partner, and get out on the dancefloor. Scots Wha Hae an’ a’ that an’ a’  that.

Not sure about the dancing? How about raising a glass to Colin Beattie. Who? Alisdair Gray has a blog where he occasionally posts letters and so on. He just posted a wonderful history of the Oran Mor pub (which is a place of beauty due in no small part to Gray’s paintings) which Beattie bought in 2002.

Not such a good thing going on a wee bit south of Scotland. Anyone passionate about theatre and theatre history, please take a minute to add your name to the growing petition to challenge the closing of the Theatre Museum in Covent Garden.

VQR has a bandwagon. The fall issue: whew.

Mistype of the day: Skinny Dipping in the Kale of the Dead.



Thu 30 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Just posted a new newsletter. Which contains secrets. It starts like this:

First: Happy St. Andrew’s Day! Get your kilt on, your flask filled, find a partner, and get out on the dancefloor. Scots Wha Hae an’ a’ that an’ a’  that.

Not sure about the dancing? How about raising a glass to Colin Beattie. Who? Alisdair Gray has a blog where he occasionally posts letters and so on. He just posted a wonderful history of the Oran Mor pub (which is a place of beauty due in no small part to Gray’s paintings) which Beattie bought in 2002.

Not such a good thing going on a wee bit south of Scotland. Anyone passionate about theatre and theatre history, please take a minute to add your name to the growing petition to challenge the closing of the Theatre Museum in Covent Garden.

VQR has a bandwagon. The fall issue: whew.

Mistype of the day: Skinny Dipping in the Kale of the Dead.



Bloggery

Mon 27 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Did you know there are now more (interesting) blogs than there are minutes in the day? Darn.
Ever feel you are living in a secret history? See the Eos blog where they’ve posted a conversation between John Crowley, Jeff Ford, Tim Powers, and James Morrow. Parts: Two, Three.
Chris Nakashima-Brown and a number of other Texan-area writers claim they have No Fear of the Future.

Texans, even those who move there, like the stance-based blog title, a good example being Maureen McHugh’s No Feeling of Falling. Go for the recipes, stay for the pictures, subscribe for continued happiness.



Dec. 2-3, NYC

Mon 27 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

We will be here:

The Independent and Small Press Book Fair, Saturday, December 2nd (10-6 PM) and Sunday, December 3rd (11-5 PM), at the Small Press Center, at 20 West 44th street, between 5th and 6th Avenues in midtown Manhattan. ([email protected] · 212.764.7021)

With over one hundred of the nation’s top indie presses, and over 28 free public programs featuring some of New York’s top political and avant-garde literary writers, the Independent and Small Press Book Fair is one of the most groundbreaking independent publishing events of the year.

This year’s Fair will be featuring some of the countries’ most cutting-edge presses, including: Akashic Books, AK Press, Allworth Press, Archipelago, Coffee House Press, Contemporary Press, Disinformation, The Feminist Press, Gingko Press, Haymarket Books, Ig Publishing, McPherson & Company, Melville House Press, Nation Books, The New Press, Ocean Press, PEN American, Persea Books, Seven Stories Press, Seven Locks Press, Small Beer Press, Soft Skull Press, The Smith and many, many more.

Some of the authors being featured at this year’s Fair include: Dore Ashton, Amiri Baraka, Jen Benka, Jennifer Baumgardner, Phong Bui, Colin Channer, T. Cooper, Michael Cunningham, Luis Francia, Steve Freeman, Matthea Harvey, Elizabeth Holtzman, Emily Jenkins, Caren Lissner, Lauren Baratz-Logsted, Jaime Manrique, Joe Meno, Jonas Mekas, Mark Crispin Miller, Eileen Myles, Greg Palast, Ed Park, Rachel Pine, Peter Plate, Katha Pollitt, Paul Robeson, Jr., Eyal Press, Dan Simon, Martha Southgate, David Levi Strauss, Monique Truong, Anne Waldman, Nation Books, PEN American, and much more…

Also, to help kick off this very exciting event, the Independent and Small Press Book Fair, in conjunction with Akashic Books & Seven Stories Press, will be hosting a Pre-Book-Fair Fiesta, on Friday, December 1st, from 8-11 p.m., at KGB Bar, on 85 E. 4th Street, at 2nd Ave in the East Village. Please come and join us for a round of drinks to celebrate Independent Publishing and the writers who publish with them!!! Please note that as a preliminary to the party, acclaimed authors Joe Meno and Peter Plate will be reading at Barnes & Noble Astor Place, at 7p.m.



Signed Waldrops; Suggestion Plea

Tue 21 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Howard Who?During a brief sidetrip to Texas (where a bunch of plausible fabulists were gathered and wondering where a certain Mr. B. Rosenbaum was {Swizzerland, it seems}), we asked a boon of Mr. Howard Waldrop. He consented (when approached with ice cream and beer: Texans!) to apply his signature to his book. Huzzah, we announced, to the surprised gila monsters everywhere. Huzzah.

Then we returned to Gueros again. For: verily, the tacos are unbeatable. Also, Las Manitas. Oh, the joy that was in our hearts, even as it was enspicened by the knowledge that we would have to leave this city of joyous eats and head away, away.

Even Joe’s Cafe was a place of wonders in this time of joy. (Joy especial as the fabulist gathering was on the edge of the City of Great Foods so to be in the center was akin to being the chocolaty center of a bon bon.) There, and a few other places, we were able to speak with Mr. N-B (interviewed here) whom, should you get the opportunity to see him read, you should take as he is, really, quite wonnerful.

Eventually retured to the Small Beer HQ and enstrengthened by our collection of Waldropian Signatures (for he is Mighty with his pen or typewriter), we are making these books, this debut collection, Howard Who? which is its name, available for sale.

Lo, it is done.

Other titles we have signed copies of: many. Move thy clickity thingy over here to see. (Kelly Link, Ellen Kushner, Alan DeNiro, Carol Emshwiller).

Now your turn: Please send us Suggestions for what kind of sale we should put on this year. Suggestions welcome by email or in the comments below.

Other tiny updates: everywhere on our site. Because the paper in the office it overwhelming, of course.

Alan is reading at the Erie Bookstore on Dec. 30th at 2 PM. Drop by and see him!

Added links to a couple more audio recordings (almost like podcasts!) of Kelly (or readers reading Kelly’s stories) here — includes a Real Audio (oh well) file from November 2005 from Prairiie Lights where she read “Monster.”

Kelly also got a nice mention in this piece about short stories by Kevin Sampsell (micro emperor!).



Preorder FAQ

Mon 20 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Q. Can I preorder 2007 books?

A. Yes, you can.

Q. Books. Hmm. Don’t they have authors?
A. Sometimes. These ones we’re working on are new novels by John Crowley, Elizabeth Hand, Laurie J. Marks, and Interfictions: an Anthology of Interstitial Writing, edited by Theodora Goss and Delia Sherman. A little more about the books is available on the preorder page. The covers below are for galleys and will change somewhere between a lot and a little before publication.

Q. And were there artists involved with the covers or did they just fall from the sky?

A. Yes on the former. Liz Hand’s cover is by Jacob McMurray; John Crowley’s features a Rosamund Purcell photograph, and the Interfictions features a photo of a box made (in all senses of the word) by Connie Toebe.
More to come on these as the months slip and stutter by until Bang! suddenly it will be April, the snow will turn to rain, and these books will be getting out there to bookshops. The excitement! The design*! The shipping complications! The paper weights! Wait. The text, baby, the text.

Hand, Generation Loss Crowley, Endless Things Marks, Water Logic Interfictions



LCRW 19

Sun 19 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

lcrw wrestles with itselfIt really is time for something about the newest, the latest, the tomorrow it’s coming before you know and the Hot New Thing is Here issue of LCRW. Aka #19. Aka The Tenth Anniversary Issue. Or: the one with wrestlers on the cover. (That Nifty Cover is by Eric Schaller.)

Hand-crafted in small batches by the printsmiths of Paradise Copies, LCRW 19 is a wafty number with stretchy impulses and chocolate overtones. Paired with a leg of lamb it asks where the other three legs and the body are; mixed with sherry, it is a (…) trifle heavy.

Fiction Yes. Pushcart nominees? Yes. But you’ll find out about them the same time you always have (ie not until the pieces get picked for the anthology. Not yet, no. One of these days? Sure). This issue contains fiction about birds, brides, bath(tubs), and, yes, wrestlers by fave writers such as Ray Vukcevich and Carol Emshwiller as well as new-to-these-pages peeps such as Daniel Rabuzzi and Katherine Beutner.

Nonfiction? Yes. A little. Dear Aunt Gwenda comes through. Phew.

Poetry? Yes.

Celebrations?Memories of those early years? The lost issues? No.
Subscription and store copies will mail out this week due to the management and the shippers’ new agreement on tea breaks, leaf raking, and chocolate supplies. The choice of a Dove dark chocolate bar for subscribers and shippers was roundly pooh-poohed by management, the shippers, and representatives from the Small Magazine Subscribers Local 44. Reports that management was later seen muching through a 48-count case of Dove’s new dark chocolate bars were denied by management and sniggered at by the shippers.

Chances of a party to celebrate this 10th anniversary ish are average to rainy.



Octavian Everything

Thu 16 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing: Traitor to the Nation: Volume One, The Pox Party CoverIn our usual post-literate manner: Yay! And: Good Golly.

The ABA claims M.T. Anderson received the National Book Award last night for The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing: Traitor to the Nation: Volume One, The Pox Party.

Numerous other internetty places confirm it, so it must be true: yay again!

Last night we were at McIntyre’s Books in Pittsboro, NC, where Kelly read to a nice wee crowd and Beth (hello Beth!) drew a monkey face in our book and we (hopefully) persuaded her to read above said book which is too rich and too smart for us to write about. Just go pick it up and read it!



Elsewhere on the web:

Mon 13 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Did we ever post these? No. Ooops. Been working on our MySpaceShip page. (It will be shiny, shiny, shiny! The spaceship. Not the page. Which will not ever exist. Until it does.)

Actually, we have been driving (hence everything being slow) and being awestruck at the devastated New Orleans. Democrats who just gained power: get to work.
— — —

Ain’t it Cool News takes on the challenge of Alan‘s collection.
Gwenda pointed us to our next car. Not saying which one.
Richard points toward this Flickr set of an ancient zine:

“The first issue of the magazine produced inside the WWI camp for English POWs in Germany. My grandfather, Sol Geduld, was the German-born son of a British subject (Harris Geduld) and put in Ruhleben at the age of 8 in the year 1915 where he lived for one year until he was traded with his father in exchange for two German prisoners.”

A recent note from the lovely folk in Cauheegan and Seattle (that would be Payseur & Schmidt — join their list at [email protected]), informed us of a few lovely oddities slipping out into the world:

John Clute and 30 Amazing Illustrators – The Darkening Garden: A Lexicon of Horror

The wait is over. Our second beautiful hardcover book is back from the printers and ready to ship. Those of you who pre-ordered will be getting your copies very soon. If you haven’t pre-ordered, now’s your chance to own this stunning, limited-edition book. John Clute explores the darker side of the fantastic with 30 motifs of horror, each accompanied by a full page illustration from a talented artist, illustrator, or designer. This material will eventually be incorporated into the author’s not-yet-published scholarly opus, The Encyclopedia of the Fantastic. 170 pages, casebound, signed and numbered by the author, and limited to 500 copies. $45.00

Postcards of Doom

This exclusive set of 30 lovely postcards highlights the hot young illustrators and artists who grace the pages of John Clute’s Darkening Garden. Printed by Payseur & Schmidt’s specialty printing pals thingmakers.net, this postcard set is housed in a deluxe die-cut box (which itself is illustrated by Adam Grano.) Limited to 300 numbered sets. $20.00

Therese Littleton – Teeth

A story of genetic transformation, interspecies conflict, and fresh seafood by Therese Littleton, author of A Case for Cannibalism and The Diving Belle. Signed and numbered limited edition of 125. 18 pages. Deluxe screen printed jacket. Each hand-stitched chapbook comes with a unique souvenir shark’s tooth. $10 plus shipping.

The shark’s tooth is a real eye-catcher, as it were.



Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 19

Wed 1 Nov 2006 - Filed under: LCRW | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

aka 10 years of doing it all wrong.

November 2006 · $5 · 56 pages · Black & white.

See Scribd preview below.

masthead
Made in the autumn of 2006 by:
Gavin J. Grant · Kelly Link
Jedediah Berry · Michael Deluca · Heidi Smith · Lauren Smith · Caitlin Beck

fiction
Ray Vukcevich, Tubs
Daniel A. Rabuzzi, Grebe’s Gift
Dennis Nau, Dropkick
Nancy Jane Moore, Phone Call Overheard on the Subway
Cara Spindler & David Erik Nelson, You Were Neither . . .
Kara Kellar Bell, The Bride
Andrew Fort, Lady Perdita Espadrille Tells the Story
Anna Tambour, The Slime: A Love Story
Carol Emshwiller, Such a Woman, Or, Sixties Rant

poetry
K.E. Duffin, Two Poems
Laura L. Washburn, The Troll in the Cellar
Katharine Beutner, Things That Make One’s Heart Beat Faster
D.M. Gordon, Sliding

nonfiction
Dear Aunt Gwenda

cover art
Eric Schaller

advertisers may include the following:

Howard Who?
Skinny Dipping in the Lake of the Dead
Dabchick Eggs
Travel Light
Carmen Dog
The South Western Wrestling Alliance
LCRW subscription department
Lady Killigrew Cafe
Moo Shoes
Night Shade Books
The Privilege of the Sword

Mothers & Other Monsters
Oddfellow Magazine
Lone Star Stories
hangfirebooks.com

The Entertainers

Kara Kellar Bell has an Honours degree in Film and Media, and lives in the West of Scotland. Her writing has appeared in Bonfire, QWF, The Gay Read, Orphan Leaf Review, Aesthetica, Open Wide, the Showcase at laurahird.com, among other publications. She is currently completing a literary thriller.

Katharine Beutner lives in Austin, Texas, where she writes novels, eats fish tacos, and studies for advanced degrees in unremunerative fields. This is her first publication.

Gwenda Bond shoots big fish in big ponds. From Kentucky, or other, less interesting places, she blogs at Shaken & Stirred.

K.E. Duffin is the author of a collection of poems, King Vulture (University of Arkansas Press). Her poems have appeared in Agni, Chelsea, Denver Quarterly, Harvard Review, The New Orleans Review, Ploughshares, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, Rattapallax, The Sewanee Review, Verse, and have been featured on Poetry Daily and Verse Daily. A painter and printmaker, Duffin lives in Somerville, Massachusetts.

Carol Emshwiller was recently awarded a Life Achievement World Fantasy Award. She is the author of the a number of collections, including Report to the Men’s Club and I Live With You, and the novels The Mount, Carmen Dog, Ledoyt, and the upcoming Secret City.

Andrew Fort writes fiction when he is not hunting bears, panthers, dragons, or dinosaurs with a Tinkertoy gun. He lives with his wife Jennifer and son Noah in Portland, Oregon, where they are sometimes gloomy but never S.A.D. His limited-edition novel The Emerald Ballroom is available through readingfrenzy.com or powells.com.

Previously an equestrian and chamber musician, D. M. Gordon moved to The Pioneer Valley in Massachusetts and drank the waters. Now she writes. Her short stories and poems have appeared in Nimrod, Weber Studies, and the Northwest Review. She is a 2006 finalist for the Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Grant in fiction, and a 2004 finalist for the same in poetry.

Nancy Jane Moore‘s novella Changeling is part of the Conversation Pieces series from Aqueduct Press. She expresses political opinions on In This Moment.

Dennis Nau graduated from St. Thomas College in St. Paul in 1971, educated to teach high school English but with a burning desire to conquer the world with his guitar. He was able to do neither. His stories have been published in Heartlands and Big Muddy. He is the mayor of Gibbon, Minnesota, and gets to discuss interesting subjects like barking dogs and cat licensing on a daily basis.

David Erik Nelson is a co-founder and editor for Poor Mojo’s Almanac(k), purveyor of fine prose, poetry and advice from the Giant Squid. Mr. Nelson is startlingly accurate with a small caliber pistol, and he is Cara Spindler’s husband.

Daniel Rabuzzi lived in Norway and Germany, earning degrees in folklore and history. An executive in an education non-profit by day, Daniel explores a world called Yount by night and on weekends. Having finished one novel about Yount, Daniel is working on a sequel and hopes to share Yount with other pilgrims soon.

If you’re the sort who keeps an ear glued to the keyhole, your eyes on the ground, and your head on the railroad track, you might have seen Eric Schaller’s cartoons featuring the character Sad Bird in the zine The White Buffalo Gazette. He contributed illustrations to Jeff VanderMeer’s The City of Saints and Madmen and has fiction forthcoming in Postscripts and The New Book of Masks.

Cara Spindler lives and works in Michigan. A long, long time ago, her favorite book was The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. She is suitably ashamed of this, but is willing to admit people are fallible (now).

Anna Tambour currently lives in the Australian bush with a large family of other species, including one man. Her collection Monterra’s Deliciosa & Other Tales & and her novel Spotted Lily are Locus Recommended Reading List selections. Medlarcomfits.blogspot.com

Ray Vukcevich’s collection, Meet Me in the Moon Room, was published by Small Beer Press, and his novel, The Man of Maybe Half-a-Dozen Faces, by St. Martin’s. He also works as a programmer in a couple of university brain labs in Oregon.

Laura Lee Washburn is an Associate Professor of English at Pittsburgh State U., an editorial board member of the Woodley Memorial Press, and the author of This Good Warm Place (March Street) and Watching the Contortionists (Palanquin Chapbook Prize). Her poetry has appeared in such journals as Carolina Quarterly, Quarterly West, The Sun, and Clackamas Review.


Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No.19 November 2006 (10 Year Issue). ISSN 1544-7782 Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996 LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press, 176 Prospect Ave., Northampton, MA 01060 · [email protected] $5 per single issue or $20/4. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Printed by Paradise Copies, 30 Craft Ave., Northampton, MA01060 413-585-0414. Thanks for reading.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 19 ebook