Kelly reads “The Hortlak”

Tue 31 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

KQED just posted a downloadable mp3 of Kelly reading one of her favorite stories to read, “The Hortlak“, on The Writers’ Block:

Kelly Link reads “The Hortlak,” from her short story collection Magic for Beginners. “The Hortlak” is a Turkish word, meaning revenant, or ghost. Eric and Batu work at the All Night Convenience store across the road from the Ausible Chasm, at the bottom of which lies a vast zombie city. Zombies stop in at the All Night on their way to the chasm. Are Eric and Batu part of some kind of “new retail” experiment designed to study the shopping habits of zombies? Will Eric ever get the nerve to talk to Charley, the woman who works at the local SPCA putting dogs to sleep?

“The Hortlak” was first published in Ellen Datlow’s ghost story anthology The Dark. Most recently it’s been translated into Japanese by Motoyuki Shibata for an anthology of recent fiction by American writers.

That city, still burning.



Happy Halloween

Tue 31 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Yes: we are going to Texas for the WFC. (To sing Joe Hill songs!) Kelly is not, apparently reading there, but we’ve got a nice reading on Sunday at 5 PM at Book People with Kelly, Howard Waldrop, and Ellen Kushner. Phew, that’s talent. Everyone else is reading here.
There’s a bookshop t-shirt tour pic here for Book People somewhere.

If this is your month to write a novel (and this is said with love): break a leg!

We’re in the American Southwest and the camera cannot be attached to the computer due to cord-at-home-itis. Duh. Must take pix anyway. Mactop can take pix with its scary little eye watching all the time. See what we’re doing now? Huh? Hello Big Brother. [Hello, said Steve J. What’s Up?]

We are in the American Southwest (as above) and the food is mostly pretty good! But it means all those submissions are just piling up back at the office. Eyargh.

LCRW? Sometime soon!

Let’s see: war in Iraq. A cockup. Rich getting richer, poor getting poorer. % of companies offering health insurance has dropped from 69% in 2000 to 60% now. (Whose term does that coincide with?). Yep: now is the time for gasoline prices to fall and to raise the fear terrorist threat level to Vote!



Slither!

Thu 26 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

For those who like the horror movies, Slither, Kelly’s favorite horror movie since Shaun of the Dead, is now available on DVD.

For those who keep track of these things, it stars Nathan Fillion of various things and is directed by James Gunn (who wrote The Specials—an excellent little film—and the newer Dawn of the Dead). Apparently it’s smart and funny and plays with all kinds of horror conventions.

Kelly would be like the millions of peeps who missed this if it weren’t for some smart folk in North Carolina who dragged her to see it. They knew what they were doing (thanks!) and she’s been telling people about it ever since. She got her copy yesterday.



What to do with podcasters.

Mon 23 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Back in July (which must have been, oh, a week ago at least), in a dimly lit restaurant we asked distinguished critic Gary Wolfe for his thoughts on podcasting.

So that’s what it’s all about.



Fri 20 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Carthage, Missouri, is the home of Janet K. Kavandi, Astronaut, and has a plaque celebrating her on the city limits. Our tiny car racks up the miles, but doesn’t approach her over 13.1 million (from 33 days in space and 535 Earth orbits).

Back in Zinelandia you can read the whole of the new ish of Xerography Debt as a PDF here.

Good days in the reading world:

Dave, Dave, Dave! Yay!

Rain Taxi Book Fest in the Twin Cities: nice! Best desserts: a tie between the churros at Masa and the dark chocolate thingy at Auriga. Or the Tetleys at Brits pub — an English pub with a bowling green on the roof. Wacky.

Next. Paperback of Magic for Beginners went back to press. Kelly is at the Conference of the Undead(!) in Berkeley then on Saturday at the the Nimrod Fest in Tulsa. Soon after, Austin. In between: Katamari Damacy. You would not guess who is to blame for this.
Strange Horizons review of The Privilege of the Sword:

The Privilege of the Sword, for all its serious underpinnings, is a delight to read, with colorful, well-defined characters and a droll sense of humor.

And a review of Maureen’s collection on Pedestal Mag:

The thirteen stories in Mothers & Other Monsters are solidly written, superbly characterized, and ultimately unforgettable.

LCRW is at the printer. 10 years old, aw. Ful (sic) of typos. Ha ha. Ew.

Raking leaves is practice for shovelling snow. Discuss.



Fri 20 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Carthage, Missouri, is the home of Janet K. Kavandi, Astronaut, and has a plaque celebrating her on the city limits. Our tiny car racks up the miles, but doesn’t approach her over 13.1 million (from 33 days in space and 535 Earth orbits).

Back in Zinelandia you can read the whole of the new ish of Xerography Debt as a PDF here.

Good days in the reading world:

Dave, Dave, Dave! Yay!

Rain Taxi Book Fest in the Twin Cities: nice! Best desserts: a tie between the churros at Masa and the dark chocolate thingy at Auriga. Or the Tetleys at Brits pub — an English pub with a bowling green on the roof. Wacky.

Next. Paperback of Magic for Beginners went back to press. Kelly is at the Conference of the Undead(!) in Berkeley then on Saturday at the the Nimrod Fest in Tulsa. Soon after, Austin. In between: Katamari Damacy. You would not guess who is to blame for this.
Strange Horizons review of The Privilege of the Sword:

The Privilege of the Sword, for all its serious underpinnings, is a delight to read, with colorful, well-defined characters and a droll sense of humor.

And a review of Maureen’s collection on Pedestal Mag:

The thirteen stories in Mothers & Other Monsters are solidly written, superbly characterized, and ultimately unforgettable.

LCRW is at the printer. 10 years old, aw. Ful (sic) of typos. Ha ha. Ew.

Raking leaves is practice for shovelling snow. Discuss.



John Klima, where are you?

Tue 10 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Catching up on his zine, anthology, chapbook, kid, life, tickets, hotel, library, shoe-making, and whatever else he is cobbling together. Ack! How does he do it. Please, organize our lives.

In the spirit of the mighty Klima, here’s the Table of Contents for the next LCRW. Due to weirdness in our UniVac Central Computational System, the website will probably not be updated with this info for a while. Darnit!

So, LCRW 19 (now with more ads!) which has the Usual Mix (TM) of new and known authors that we find so dear to our hearts. And has an awesome, fragile, thumpity-thump cover. (That will make sense when you see it.) And this will be its composition. (Not including the chocolate.) Should have it in Texas but mailing date is still unsure:

Fiction

Ray Vukcevich, Tubs
Daniel A. Rabuzzi, Grebe’s Gift
Dennis Nau, Dropkick
Nancy Jane Moore, Phone Call Overheard on the Subway
Cara Spindler & David Erik Nelson, You Were Neither . . .
Kara Kellar Bell, The Bride
Andrew Fort, Lady Perdita Espadrille Tells the Story
Anna Tambour, The Slime: A Love Story
Carol Emshwiller, Such a Woman, Or, Sixties Rant

Nonfiction

Dear Aunt Gwenda

Poetry

K.E. Duffin, Two Poems
Laura L. Washburn, The Troll in the Cellar
Katharine Beutner, Things That Make One’s Heart Beat Faster
D.M. Gordon, Sliding

Cover art: Eric Schaller



Rust Belt Surrealist

Tue 10 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Yes he is. Look at that, a great piece on new wave fabulists in the Boston Globe.

The Globe is of course the only remaining spherical newspaper in the world (after the demise of the Atlanta Sphere in the midst of the late 20th century depression).

Bostonians (and readers elsewhere) have long-established habits and traditions of how to read it. Some prefer the onion-skinning method of peeling a page off at a time, while others prefer flattening the whole thing and reading it as if it were any other daily. That all supposes that no one kicks it off your front step in the first place. Since the New York Times purchased the Globe a couple of years ago, there have been persistent rumors that the new ownership would switch the format but local sentiment (as well the daily tours of the unique Mercury Grace presses) have thus far prevented it.

Our favorite use of unread copies of the Globe are the Lynn Circular Houses. The hive was begun in the early 1970s and is still occasionally added to. Pictures can be found here.



Meanwhile, over the water

Mon 9 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Like Looper or some of the other mellow relaxipop coming across the water from Scotland? Readers who remember this guy, might want to go check out First Tiger. Pop! (Friend them or whatever one does on the mindspace?) There’s more here. When wil they cross the pond to superstardom?

Also: Scotland put one past France!



Elliott Bay

Fri 6 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Bookshop T-shirt tour: Elliott Bay in Seattle, WA. Nice rich color, good for autumn.

There are tons of great bookshops in Seattle. Some of them probably don’t force you to turn your back to people to show off the wonder of their graphic design dept. But Elliott Bay is confident that you will. Or, that you’re a leader and people behind you will suddenly realize that they should pop off to the original E.Bay and get a book.

A book? How about something naughty and futuristic for the weekend? Such as Sex in the System: Stories of Erotic Futures, Technological Stimulation, and the Sensual Life of Machines. (That’s, er, a mouthful.) Edited by Cecilia Tan, it has stories from Sarah Micklem, Steve Berman, Jennifer Stevenson, Scott Westerfeld (reprinted from Say…), Gavin J. Grant (reprinted from Singularity a while back), at least one pseudonymous author, and an orgy of others. (“Orgy” being the collective term for erotica writers, no?) Funny cover, too. Don’t know if there are Seattle writers in this, or if there’s a Seattle event planned, but you can always go read it aloud at a park and see what happens.



Handy Book Sense pick

Thu 5 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Saffron and Brimstone: Strange Stories CoverWe are way behind with spotlighting good recent reads. Happily Book Sense made it slightly easier on us by choosing Liz Hand’s new collection, Saffron and Brimstone, as a Book Sense pick (um, next month):

SAFFRON AND BRIMSTONE: Strange Stories, by Elizabeth Hand (M Press, $14.95 paper, 1595820965) “Stories from a master of lapidary style and fey fiction. I’m reminded of John Fowles’ touch of the mythical in The Magus, but Hand is no imitator — she wields her own magic.” —Pauline Ziniker, Country Bookshelf, Bozeman, MT



T-shirt tour

Thu 5 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Prairie Lights, Iowa City. Nice aesthetic. Pity about the bod.



Bye, Mark. Bye Dennis? Bye bye George.

Wed 4 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Mark Foley may bring down the government. (Perhaps it’s time to start drinking, not stop?) After the torture “debate”, hackable voting machines, pushing a war (or two, hello Afghanistan, increased opium production and all) based on false (where are the Weapons of Mass Destruction?) premises, an energy policy crafted by oil insiders, and so (endlessly) on for the last six years, the present administration is going down over this? Sure, why not.

Didn’t they learn from last time they were in power? It’s the Cover Up, stupid.

Mark Foley is a poor fuck-up who we now hear was an abused kid, is gay, and a drunk—still waiting to hear his next excuse; believe it has something to do with being paid to send those IMs by the Democratic National Committee. He was the Co-chairman of the House Caucus on Missing and Exploited Children by day and, by day, exploiting children. The question rattling through Washington is who knew what he was doing and when?

Who thought it was a good idea to shuffle reports of his behavior into the “to do later” pile? Fire them all! This isn’t anti-Republican. It’s not a campaign orchestrated by anyone: if anything it’s a consensual cover-up being exposed. The IMs are coming from ex-Pages (who don’t want their own careers ruined), not from anyone else in DC.
There’s no organization, company, or group in the world who wouldn’t be calling for the heads of anyone involved in not acting on this information.



Poor hungry Not a Journal.

Wed 4 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Never gets fed. Until this afternoon.
Ellen Kushner’s The Privilege of the Sword pb is in its 4th printing. Our edition is selling nicely.

Great review of Howard Who?

Back in print after so many years, Howard Who? remains a terrific collection of short stories. There is nobody else alive writing stories as magnificently strange, deliriously inventive, and utterly wonderful as Howard Waldrop. More.

This won’t stay online, so here’s the full thing.

Nancy Pearl Books Reviews for 10/2/2006:

On the one hand, reading Magic for Beginners, Kelly Link’s exquisitely loopy collection of stories, demands a certain suspension of disbelief, not unlike when you read Garcia Marquez, Salman Rushdie, or the other magical realists. (As Shakespeare had Hamlet note, “There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”) You simply have to accept (at least for the length of the story) that there might be zombies living among us, or that a purse can expand to hold a complete village. On the other hand, Link’s writing is so remarkable, her use of language so mind-boggling perfect, that you’re sucked into the world of the stories before you know it, beguiled by descriptions like this one, of a sofa covered in “…an orange-juice-colored corduroy that makes it appear as if the couch has just escaped from a maximum security prison for criminally insane furniture.” My favorite is the title story, which reminds me of a drawing by M.C. Escher’s picture The Drawing Hands. It’s intricate, wildly imaginative, and totally wonderful. Whether or not you think you like fantasy, if you’re a fan of inventive plots and good writing – Link’s use of language will fill you with awe and joy – don’t miss this collection.



Get your name in a story &c.

Wed 4 Oct 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

More interesting things from the Clarion auction: your name in a Kelly Link story. Howard Waldrop on your answering machine. Your name in a Kate Wilhelm novel. Wacky. Other cool stuff.