Thu 29 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sarah Monette, who has had a few stories in LCRW, has a second novel out right now, The Virtu. This one stands by itself in the way her debut didn’t (the books are in a series, although they don’t tell you that). The Virtu races along and Monette gives her characters some great dialogue. It’s a book mostly about boys but there is a great governess (who isn’t, of course) who is so much fun that she is missed when she disappears off screen. A great book to get stuck into late on a summer’s eve.



Thu 29 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Sarah Monette, who has had a few stories in LCRW, has a second novel out right now, The Virtu. This one stands by itself in the way her debut didn’t (the books are in a series, although they don’t tell you that). The Virtu races along and Monette gives her characters some great dialogue. It’s a book mostly about boys but there is a great governess (who isn’t, of course) who is so much fun that she is missed when she disappears off screen. A great book to get stuck into late on a summer’s eve.



Flying visit

Thu 29 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Last minute notice: Sean Stewart will be here on July 1st (yay!) and besides quizzing him about secret projects he can’t tell us about anyway, we’ve asked him to sign copies of Mockingbird and Perfect Circle. So if you would like Sean to sign either or both to you or someone else, order now. Special offer below (shipping frrree within the US + Canada):



LCRW 18

Sat 24 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

A couple of people wondered where the car fuel economy figures quoted in LCRW 18 came from. Some came from research done by Erik, one of der interns. Otherwise, the best resource was the Vehicle Certification Agency site. None of the cars seem to get over 70 mpg, but check the 61-70 range and you’ll see a ton of cars by Toyota, Nissan, Smart (which start selling here in ’07 — send us a demo and we’ll blog it!), Citroen, Renault, etc. etc. Lovely, comfy cars of the future.

Also from LCRW 18:

Two Notes

1. LCRW comes out twice a year. Should you wish a third issue, please send us a check for $500. That issue will be the Your-Name-Here Issue. It will also be numbered for our simpler editors.

2. A new literary award. We believe everyone is special (even those people who don’t read — or write for — LCRW, but this award is not for them). Here is the press release:

June 2006, Northampton, MA. LCRW and Small Beer announces The Eponymous Award, given to all writers on publication in LCRW of their writing. So, Bob Smith has been awarded the Bob Smith Award for Fiction Writing. Jane Smith has been awarded the Nonfiction Award. D.K. Smith has been awarded the Poetry Award. You get the idea.


Thu 22 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Howard Who? Books. That thing above is the real and actual Howard Who? cover. More stuff was added to the page. A crap condition hardcover of this can be got for almost the same price as our upcoming pb, but you wouldn’t get Kevin Huizenga’s Ugly Chicken drawing! On Bookfinder, ABE, etc., it runs about $40 for a nice non-library copy, and Elliott Bay, B. Brown, and more have it up around $125 for a fine/fine signed HC. Howard will be at World Fantasy Con in Austin, TX, in November, and you can get him to sign your copy there.

This book should shoot out once word gets around. It’s 20 years old but this is alt. hist. fic. so the stories aren’t dated, if anything they’re just more heartbreaking, more harsh. Was “Horror, We Got” really published? Damn. Should send it out to blowhards and talking heads and step back and watch them get all head-explodey.

– In picture books, you gots to read MOME. The Spring/Summer ish is “Designed by acclaimed designer and cartoonist Jordan Crane” and “spotlight[s] a regular cast of a dozen of today’s most exciting cartoonist.” ‘Tis true. Wacky, deep, odd, not your average kitchen sink-is-clogged-what-should-I-do lit comics antho.



Thu 22 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Howard Who? Books. That thing above is the real and actual Howard Who? cover. More stuff was added to the page. A crap condition hardcover of this can be got for almost the same price as our upcoming pb, but you wouldn’t get Kevin Huizenga’s Ugly Chicken drawing! On Bookfinder, ABE, etc., it runs about $40 for a nice non-library copy, and Elliott Bay, B. Brown, and more have it up around $125 for a fine/fine signed HC. Howard will be at World Fantasy Con in Austin, TX, in November, and you can get him to sign your copy there.

This book should shoot out once word gets around. It’s 20 years old but this is alt. hist. fic. so the stories aren’t dated, if anything they’re just more heartbreaking, more harsh. Was “Horror, We Got” really published? Damn. Should send it out to blowhards and talking heads and step back and watch them get all head-explodey.

– In picture books, you gots to read MOME. The Spring/Summer ish is “Designed by acclaimed designer and cartoonist Jordan Crane” and “spotlight[s] a regular cast of a dozen of today’s most exciting cartoonist.” ‘Tis true. Wacky, deep, odd, not your average kitchen sink-is-clogged-what-should-I-do lit comics antho.



Locus Awards

Sun 18 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Locus Awards Winners announced Saturday night at the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame in Seattle. Congratulations to all the winners which included the following:

Best Novella: “Magic for Beginners“, Kelly Link (Magic for Beginners, F&SF 9/05)

Best Anthology: The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror: Eighteenth Annual Collection, Ellen Datlow, Kelly Link & Gavin Grant, eds. (St. Martin’s)

Best Collection: Magic for Beginners, Kelly Link (Small Beer Press)

Storyteller Best Non-Fiction: Storyteller: Writing Lessons and More from 27 Years of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop, Kate Wilhelm (Small Beer Press)



Mothers & Other Monsters a Plain Dealer Summer Reading Pick, etc.

Sat 17 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Maureen F. McHugh’s Mothers & Other Monsters is a Cleveland Plain Dealer Recommended Summer Reading pick: “Unpredictable and poetic work.”

– Updated Alan‘s readings — that man is going to get around! Bring it on, we think he says.

Don’t remember if foreign rights were updated recently (we are horribly behind on contracts — fortunately these ones are done by more competent people than us!). As was mentioned in this story, Magic for Beginners, has sold to the United Kingdom — which is incredibly exciting. It has also sold to Hayakawa, Japan, Donzelli Editore, Italy, Gayatari Publishing, Russia, Harcourt/Harvest, USA pb, Argo, Czech Republic, and Grup Editorial Tritonic, Romania, and Verlagsgruppe Random House GmbH, Germany. This stuff gets updated here.

More rights news to come, yay for readers all over this world.



LCRW 18

Sun 11 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

LCRW 18 slowly trickles out into the world:

June 2006 · $5 · 60 pages · Black & white with handtinted woodblock cuts by famous and unknown artists. Printed on a 12th century Chinese letterpress on sheets of kelp-paper handmade by centaurs and sprites. Unattractively bound in the skins of dead animals. Alternately: attractively bound in more handmade paper, these sheets fairly traded from The Mysterions: Those Who Live at the Center of the Earth.

Not in stores yet and not out to all reviewers or subscribers but getting there. Slowed this week by more travel but some people will be working on it. Yay for them! In the meantime, here’s what it is:

Table of Contents

fiction

David J. Schwartz — Play
John Schoffstall — Errant Souls
Becca De La Rosa — This Is The Train The Queen Rides On
Scot Peacock — Diabolique d’amour
Stephanie Parent — In Ophelia’s Garden
Will McIntosh — Followed
E. Catherine Tobler — Threads
Matthew Lee Bain — A Half-Lizard Boy
Peter Bebergal — A Static of Names
Sarah Micklem The Fabricant of Marvels
Angela Slatter — The Juniper Tree
Jeannette Westwood — Crimson-lady at the Auction, Buying
Fred Coppersmith — At Uncle Ogden’s House
Michael Emmons — A Message from the Welcomer
Veronica Schanoes — Swimming

poetry
Jenny Benjamin-Smith — Two Poems
Sunshine Ison — Two Poems
Tsultrim Dorjee — Son of a Bitch

nonfiction
Erik Gallant — Music Reviews
Gwenda Bond — Dear Aunt Gwenda
[Name Withheld] — Article Withdrawal
William Smith — The Film Column
Zine Reviews

cover art
Emily Wilson



Famke

Wed 7 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Congratulations to Uzodinma Iweala whose Beasts of No Nation won the 6th Annual Young Lions Award (and was a Time book of the year and won the L.A. Times Book Award) . The three nights were a total blast and thanks and congrats go out to the Young Lions organization for putting it all together.

On the awards night Famke Janssen (…!) read an excerpt from Kelly’s story “The Hortlak” — which, with the line about the city still burning in her eyes, made a lot of sense. Great reading. Terrance Howard and Ethan Hawke (a cofounder of the award) did lively readings of excerpts from the other 4 finalists (list below). Wow. The next night was the Young Lions Fundraising gala. A drinkie was had beforehand which was smart as reinforcement was necessary to survive the night. Tres fancy. The set were all out in Roaring 20s splendour (or, 20s Splenda: just as sweet, a fraction of the calories, and not quite natural) and lovely it was to see. After a relaxed dinner (veggie options, yay!) all the finalists danced until the place got closed down — excellent stuff, although odd how as the night went on the music got older. Hmm. Perhaps playing to the crowd? Dance, dance, revolution, but without the revolution thing. A surreal week that other awards could emulate!



Sat 3 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Bear discovers flickr. YouTube.



Sat 3 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Bear discovers flickr. YouTube.



reviews, signed books

Fri 2 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Alan DeNiro news: Small Spiral Notebook review, Ideomancer interview and review of Skinny Dipping in the Lake of the Dead.

New review of Storyteller — of which we now have signed copies in stock:

“Satisfying in its own right, presenting an informative, and entertaining, blend of history, memoirs, and writing lessons.”
Steven Silver

We also have a few signed copies of our Carol Emshwiller books. (Good news there: she handed in a new novel to Jacob Weissman at Tachyon Books.)



Young Lions

Thu 1 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Magic for Beginners is a finalist for the Young Lions Award. This year’s finalists are:

Uzodinma Iweala, Beasts of No Nation
Rattawut Lapcharoensap, Sightseeing
Kelly Link, Magic for Beginners
Ander Monson, Other Electricites
Eric Puchner, Music Through the Floor

There are 3(!) nights of events:

  • Tues, June 6: Pre-party for readers, judges, founders of YL, finalists and guests.
  • Wed, June 7, 7-9 PM: Sixth Annual Young Lions Fiction Award Ceremony at the Humanities & Social Sciences Library in the Celeste Bartos Forum, Fifth Ave. & 42nd St. (please use the entrance at 42nd St.) In this cabaret-like setting, we will be presenting the Sixth Annual Young Lions Fiction Award, honoring the works of today’s Young Fiction Writers. Selections from the finalists’ books will be read by Ethan Hawke and other distinguished guests.
  • Thurs, June 8, 7-9 PM : Young Lions Fiction Award Benefit Dinner
    — 9:00p – 1:00a Dance. @ the Humanities & Social Sciences Library, Fifth Ave. & 42nd St. (please use the entrance at Fifth Ave.)


Good news for Elaine

Thu 1 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Elaine Chen, who painted the mockingbird and hand piece for the cover of Sean Stewart’s Mockingbird, has been nominated for a 2006 Prix Aurora Award (Artistic Achievement). The nomination is for the body of work Ms. Chen produced in 2005. The Prix Aurora Awards awards celebrate excellence in Canadian science fiction and fantasy. TT20 is proud to host the awards ceremony and related events at our convention in Toronto, July 7-9, 2006.



Mothers & Other Monsters

Thu 1 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The Story PrizePublication day for the trade paperback edition of Mothers & Other Monsters. It’s in stores now, as they say, or order early for Father’s Day.

This edition has added material (no extra stories, so no worries there, completists) for book clubs and reading groups (PDF Download). There’ll be an interview with the author, questions, and a reprint of Maureen’s fabulous essay, “The Evil Stepmother.”

You can pre-order this one on Book Sense, Powells, Amazon, etc. or from here. Do not miss!



Mothers & Other Monsters

Thu 1 Jun 2006 - Filed under: Books | 6 Comments| Posted by: intern

The Story Prize“Gorgeously crafted stories.” — Nancy Pearl, NPR, Morning Edition, “Books for a Rainy Day

Story Prize finalist · BookSense Notable Book · Cleveland Plain Dealer Recommended Summer Reading

Also available in a signed, numbered limited edition.

In her luminous, long-awaited debut collection, award-winning novelist McHugh wryly and delicately examines the impacts of social and technological shifts on families. Using beautiful, deceptively simple prose, she illuminates the relationship between parents and children and the expected and unexpected chasms that open between generations:

—A woman introduces her new lover to her late brother.
—A teenager is interviewed about her peer group’s attitudes toward sex and baby boomers.
—A missing stepson sets a marriage on edge.
—Anthropologists visiting an isolated outpost mission are threatened by nomadic raiders.

McHugh’s characters—her Alzheimers-afflicted parents or her smart and rebellious teenagers—are always recognizable: stubborn, human, and heartbreakingly real. The trade paperback has bonus added material for book clubs and reading groups, including an interview with the author, book club questions and suggestions, and a reprint of Maureen’s fabulous essay, “The Evil Stepmother.”

Maureen F. McHugh is the author of four acclaimed novels. Her genre-expanding short fiction has won the Hugo and Locus Awards and has frequently been included in Best of the Year anthologies. Since 1988 she has attracted a broad readership in publications such as Asimov’s, Scifiction, Starlight, The Year’s Best Science Fiction, and The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror. She lives in Los Angeles where she writes alternate reality games.

Table of Contents

Ancestor Money
In the Air
The Cost to Be Wise
The Lincoln Train
Interview: On Any Given Day
Oversite
Wicked
Laika Comes Back Safe
Presence
Eight-Legged Story
The Beast
Nekropolis
Frankenstein’s Daughter

Reading Group Guide (Download as PDF)

The Evil Stepmother: An Essay
Author Interview
Talking Points

Reviews

“Gorgeously crafted stories.” — Nancy Pearl on NPR, Morning Edition, “Books for a Rainy Day

“Unpredictable and poetic work.” — Cleveland Plain Dealer (Recommended Summer Reading)

“[McHugh] cherry-picks subtle magical or futuristic elements from the expansive genre library.” — Angle Magazine

“McHugh’s prose style is unique.” — LEO (Louisville Eccentric Observer)

“McHugh’s stories are hauntingly beautiful.” — Booklist

“The 13 stories in McHugh’s debut collection offer poignant and sometimes heartwrenching explorations of personal relationships and their transformative power…. McHugh (Nekropolis) relates her stories as slices of ordinary life whose simplicity masks an emotional intensity more often found in poetry. The universality of these tales should break them out to the wider audience they deserve.”
Publishers Weekly

“Passion and precision.” — Locus

“McHugh is enormously talented…. [She] has a light touch, a gentle sense of a humor, and a keen wit. — Strange Horizons

“There’s not a single story that isn’t strong, and most are brilliant.” — Ideomancer

Story Prize finalist. Pictures from the event: Maureen, Maureen & Larry Dark, Maureen, fellow finalist Jim Harrison, and winner Patrick O’Keefe

A Book Sense Notable Book.

BookStandard.com Interview.

Maureen McHugh & Sarah Willis in conversation: parts 1, 2 & 3.

Also available as a beautiful limited edition.

Advance Praise

“My favorite thing about her is the wry, uncanny tenderness of her stories. She has the astonishing ability to put her finger on the sweet spot right between comedy and tragedy, that pinpoint that makes you catch your breath. You’re not sure whether to laugh out loud or cry, and you end up doing both at once.” —Dan Chaon, Among the Missing

“When I first read China Mountain Zhang many years ago, Maureen McHugh instantly became, as she has remained, one of my favorite writers. This collection is a welcome reminder of her power—they are resonant, wise, generous, sharp, transporting, and deeply, deeply moving. McHugh is enormously gifted; each of these stories is a gift.” —Karen Joy Fowler, The Jane Austen Book Club

“Wonderfully unpredictable stories, from the very funny to the very grim, by one of our best and bravest imaginative writers.”
—Ursula K. Le Guin, Changing Planes

“Enchanting, funny and fierce by turns—a wonderful collection!”
—Mary Doria Russell, A Thread of Grace

On the web:

Blog
Interview
We Have Seen the Future
Why I am Not Postmodern

Short short story: “Makeover

Creative Commons

April 22, 2008: Released online as a free download under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Cover image © Conde Nast Archive/Corbis. Photographer: Erwin Blumenfeld.
Download
cover for print.



Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 18

Thu 1 Jun 2006 - Filed under: LCRW | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

$5 · 60 pages · Black & white with handtinted woodblock cuts by famous and unknown artists. Printed on a 12th century Chinese letterpress on sheets of kelp-paper handmade by centaurs and sprites. Unattractively bound in the skins of dead animals. Alternately: attractively bound in more handmade paper, these sheets fairly traded from The Mysterions: Those Who Live at the Center of the Earth.

Two Notes

1. LCRW comes out twice a year. Should you wish a third issue, please send us a check for $500. That issue will be the Your-Name-Here Issue. It will also be numbered for our simpler editors.

2. A new literary award. We believe everyone is special (even those people who don’t read — or write for — LCRW, but this award is not for them). Here is the press release:

June 2006, Northampton, MA. LCRW and Small Beer announces The Eponymous Award, given to all writers on publication in LCRW of their writing. So, Bob Smith has been awarded the Bob Smith Award for Fiction Writing. Jane Smith has been awarded the Nonfiction Award. D.K. Smith has been awarded the Poetry Award. You get the idea.

Reviews

“I always like this kind of publication: there is fiction, non-fiction, poetry and illustration – something for everyone – and I felt, from the start, that I would find this to be an enjoyable little zine. I was wrong. This is more than simply enjoyable: it is purely, simply, incredibly delightful! Becca De La Rosa almost moves me to tears, enlisting me to look for burn ointment in a Helsinki airport; E. Catherine Tobler’s gypsy girls are charming; and who is John Schoffstall? He seduced me with a few simple sentences and I feel that I should – at the very least – send him a thank you card for his prose. Thank you, John, that was so thoughtful. I love it: ‘–But youth is careless, and Jorge was young, so it happened that one dreary evening in November, in the raw, wet time when the etheric winds howl across the heath, Jorge felt –’ I won’t tell you what happens next. You will simply have to get a copy of “Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet” for yourself.”
—Andree Lachapelle, Broken Pencil

masthead
Made in the spring of 2006 by:
Gavin J. Grant · Kelly Link
Jedediah Berry · Michael Deluca · Erik Gallant
The Fiction Workshop at Lenoir-Rhyne College

fiction
David J. Schwartz — Play
John Schoffstall — Errant Souls
Becca De La Rosa — This Is The Train The Queen Rides On
Scot Peacock — Diabolique d’amour
Stephanie Parent — In Ophelia’s Garden
Will McIntosh — Followed
E. Catherine Tobler — Threads
Matthew Lee Bain — A Half-Lizard Boy
Peter Bebergal — A Static of Names
Sarah Micklem The Fabricant of Marvels
Angela Slatter — The Juniper Tree
Jeannette Westwood — Crimson-lady at the Auction, Buying
Fred Coppersmith — At Uncle Ogden’s House
Michael Emmons — A Message from the Welcomer
Veronica Schanoes — Swimming

poetry
Jenny Benjamin-Smith — Two Poems
Sunshine Ison — Two Poems
Tsultrim Dorjee — Son of a Bitch

nonfiction
Erik Gallant — Music Reviews
Gwenda Bond — Dear Aunt Gwenda
[Name Withheld] — Article Withdrawal
William Smith — The Film Column
Zine Reviews

cover art
Emily Wilson

advertisers may include the following:
Skinny Dipping in the Lake of the Dead
Mothers & Other Monsters
Oddfellow Magazine
Jubilat
Mockingbird
Perfect Circle
LCRW
subscription department
Small Beer Press Chapbook Series
Travel Light
Barbara Stanwyck fan club
Howard Who?
Storyteller: Writing Lessons from 27 years of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop
Lady Killigrew Cafe
Carmen Dog
Forthcoming books
Future Bestsellers Club

those writers

Matthew Lee Bain writes: I am twenty-nine autumns old. My avocations include the study of psychology, German (language and culture), and philology. In my free time, I enjoy strength training, viewing avant-garde cinema, and rolling around on the floor while screaming in agony. My vocations include writing fiction and poetry; I’m a freelance daydreamer of dark fantasies.

Gwenda Bond wears an N95 mask while posting about books and writing at her blog, Shaken & Stirred.

Fred Coppersmith finds it difficult to write about himself in the third person. He writes stories, and sometimes things that aren’t stories — and sometimes, late at night, things that are caught in some weird place in between. As luck would have it, he lives in New York.

Jenny Benjamin-Smith has had poems published in the New York Quarterly, Poetry Motel, Wisconsin Review, Iowa Woman, Columbia, and Crab Orchard Review. She has poems forthcoming in the South Carolina Review, Chelsea, The Baltimore Review, Hubbub, and Carquinez Poetry Review. She teaches literature to high school students in Milwaukee, Wisc.

Peter Bebergal is the co-author, with Scott Korb, of The Faith Between Us (forthcoming, Bloomsbury), and is an editor at Zeek.net. He lives in Cambridge, Mass.

Becca De La Rosa lives in Ireland and is studying English at university. She refuses to apologise for this. Her fiction has appeared most recently at Strange Horizons, among other places.

Tsultrim Dorjee lives in Southern New Hampshire where he is a student at Vermont College. He received his Tibetan name from Lama Pema Wangdak, and works as a crisis line operator for a peer support center. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in, The Awakenings Review, Puckerbrush Review, Sacred Journey and Red Owl.

Michael Emmons was born and raised in Missoula, MT, where he now lives. In 2004 he graduated from Northwestern University with a degree in English. This is his first published story.

Erik Gallant lives in Northampton, MA.

Sunshine Ison works in Mexico, is writing a book on beauty pageants, and next year will be working in Vietnam.

Will McIntosh has sold stories to Interzone, Futurismic, Abyss & Apex, Albedo One, and Challenging Destiny. By day, he’s a psychology professor at Georgia Southern University.

Sarah Micklem published her first novel, Firethorn, in 2004. She is currently working on the sequel, Wildfire (Scribner., 2007). She lives in New York and Indiana, where she teaches at Notre Dame University. “The Fabricant of Marvels” is part of a series of folk tales from the nonexistent island, Abigomas.

Famous Novelist is working on his umpteenth Great American Sleep Device. His “story” here was written in 1972 and is published in an attempt to pull in more readers for this zine and to pay for his coffee this week.

Stephanie Parent is a recent graduate of Franklin & Marshall College, where she majored in English and Women’s Studies. She is currently working as a piano teacher in Baltimore, Maryland while working on a young adult novel. She hopes to attend graduate school in England next year.

Scot Peacock is a senior editor in the academic reference field. His works of weird romance, published in such journals as The Suburbanite and Pluto’s Orchard, are few and far between. A novel about a ghost and his mother will remain unfinished for years.

Veronica Schanoes is a writer and scholar whose work has previously appeared on Endicott Studio, Jabberwocky, and Trunk Stories, as well as LCRW. Her poem “The Room” was recently published by Papaveria Press. She does not like cats.

Ma-tsu and John Schoffstall were out for a walk, when they saw some wild geese flying past.
“What are they?” asked Ma-tsu.
“They’re wild geese,” said John.
“Where are they going?” demanded Ma-tsu.
John replied, “They’ve already flown away.”
Suddenly Ma-tsu grabbed John by the nose and twisted it so that John cried out in pain. “How,” he shouted, “could they ever have flown away?”
“Well,” said John, “a bird’s wing is arched, so that air takes longer to pass over the top than the bottom. Through the Bernoulli principle, this creates lift, enabling flight. Muscular activity provides forward thrust. Birds’ bodies also have a number of specializations for flight, including hollow bones that decrease their weight relative to other vertebrates, and a streamlined shape. Birds in flight will rapidly out-distance individuals on the ground, eventually disappearing from their view behind trees or other landscape features. Thus, the birds were able to fly away.”
“You’re never going to achieve enlightenment, are you?” Ma-tsu asked.
“I just think birds are cool,” John replied. “I’m hungry. C’mon, let’s get lunch.”

David J. Schwartz lives in Chicago with a guitar named June. Cyberdavidjschwartz lives here, but is moody. His stories and poems live in The Third Alternative, Say…, Talebones, and Strange Horizons, as well as previous issues of this publication and others. Han kan norsk, men ikke saa bra.

Angela Slatter is a Masters in Creative Writing student at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia. Her flash fiction has appeared on Antipodean SF several times and she ghost-writes finance articles to help pay the bills. She can often be found pushing papers around a desk at the Creative Writing & Cultural Studies Discipline at QUT, putting her admin-nerd skills to good use.

William Smith makes spanky new books and sells dusty old ones. Find him at trunkstories.com and hangfirebooks.com.

E. Catherine Tobler climbed mountains in her youth, in a bright yellow coat, with shoes that were red, yellow, and blue, and made her feel like a clown. She endured. Writing, she decided, is not that much different. In addition to other places, her short fiction has appeared in SciFiction, Strange New Worlds, Mota 3, and Would That It Were.

Jeannette Westwood is seventeen years old and has attended the Alpha SF/F/H Workshop for Young Writers. She likes paper-mache cats. This is her first publication.

Emily Wilson finds stories inspire her and enable her to create more than she could on her own — she loves to collaborate. She believes that with all our powers combined we can fight for justice much more easily, and wear really fun outfits — perhaps matching, in fluorescent colors.

 

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No.18 June 2006 (The Ethereal Issue). ISSN 1544-7782 Text in Bodoni Book. Titles in Imprint MT Shadow. Since 1996 LCRW has usually appeared in June and November from Small Beer Press: [email protected] lcrw.net/lcrw $5 per single issue or $20/4. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, & all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Printed by Paradise Copies, 30 Craft Ave., Northampton, MA 01060 413-585-0414. Thanks for reading.