Kelly in February

Tue 28 Feb 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

28 – The Nebula finalists list came out: congratulations to those on it — Kelly Link from our list, lots of other good writers, mais oui.

12 – Kelly Link Q&A (Charlotte Observer).

Q. Do you have a writing ritual?

My husband and I work at home, so it’s difficult for me to write there. So what I do when I’m in Northampton is I walk or bike into town and I meet a writer at a coffee house. We’ll meet for anywhere from two hours to five hours. We’ll just sit in the cafe and work together on our laptops. It’s very comfortable working with someone else. If we’re stuck on something, we’ll ask each other questions. We’ll ask ‘How does this sound?’ We’ll bounce ideas off each other and we’ll problem-solve for each other. The walk is a part of the process. By the time I get there, I’m anxious to work on a story.

10 – A picture of Kelly Link reading summer ’05 at Malaprop’s in Asheville. (Thanks, Carrie.)



Assumptions on the Readership of this Luxury Product

Thu 16 Feb 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Matt Cheney has posted a poem from LCRW 16: “Scorpions” by Chris Fox.

Matt has a great piece on the accessibility of texts on Strange Horizons. A long time ago (LCRW 4, 1999…eek!) we listed a few “Assumptions on the Readership of this ‘Luxury Product'”:

You read.(1)

You read English.

You have a home.(2)

You are not chronically hungry.(2)

You will not Disappear. (2)(3)

You regard some part of your income as ‘disposable.’ (1)(2)(3)(4)

  1. And, oddly enough, you occasionally go beyond mass media products and read tiny magazines with great fiction, poetry and odd little ideas.
  2. Unless you found this in the trash.
  3. You need not fear for your life by reading or possessing this or any other text or idea, samizdat or other.
  4. You sometimes consider where the money you work for goes. You sometimes try economic support of ideas and ideologies. You don’t always fall for the hype. You shop as a pastime. You don’t always buy ‘brand’ names. This may be time-consuming and wear you out. In 5 years you will be going to the mall thinking of all the time this is saving you.


Meet Howard

Mon 13 Feb 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Updates on where you can meet, greet, and buy Howard Waldrop a beer this year. The man says these are the only places he’s going this year. (We had it wrong before, sorry.) Our Peapod edition of Howard Who? won’t be out until the second of these convention things:

May 26-28 — Conquest, Kansas City, Missouri

August 11-13 — Armadillocon, Austin, TX

November 2-5 — World Fantasy Con in Austin, TX

Note that two of these conventions are in Austin (look out for a reading there, too). Howard is an iconoclast who has always lived only on his income from his fiction. And, for the most part, he’s a short story writer. As you can imagine, his travel budget isn’t great. Buy that man a beer, make him write some more.



Sun 12 Feb 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Lydia Millet’s Pure & Radiant HeartOh Pure and Radiant Heart is an incredible, immersive experience. It is at once hopeful and also a dark, depressing journal of our national and and international potentially-fatal nuclear fascination.

Millet imagines the consequences and fallout of the sudden appearance of three nuclear scientists from the 1940s in 2004. Most of the novel is told through the eyes of Ann and Ben, a quiet and content couple from New Mexico. They have found places in the world, a library, gardens, to work and to love.

Ann is one of the first to recognize and then believe in the scientists, Robert Oppenheimer, Leo Szilard, and Enrico Fermi. Ben is less convinced but goes along with Ann as she gives the scientists a place to stay. She, as are most others, is most taken with Oppenheimer. A cult of personality forms around the scientists even as they try to get the government to acknowledge their existence and listen to their message of nuclear nonproliferation. Millet makes occasional swipes toward explaining the scientists’ reappearance, but for the most part they are taken as an unexplained natural phenomena which people interpret to fit their preconceived beliefs.

Oh Pure and Radiant Heart is a dark, brilliant novel by an author not afraid to look into our hearts and see our best and the worst. If the end is inevitable and unsurprising it is also commentary on our times that make it so.



Sun 12 Feb 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Lydia Millet’s Pure & Radiant HeartOh Pure and Radiant Heart is an incredible, immersive experience. It is at once hopeful and also a dark, depressing journal of our national and and international potentially-fatal nuclear fascination.

Millet imagines the consequences and fallout of the sudden appearance of three nuclear scientists from the 1940s in 2004. Most of the novel is told through the eyes of Ann and Ben, a quiet and content couple from New Mexico. They have found places in the world, a library, gardens, to work and to love.

Ann is one of the first to recognize and then believe in the scientists, Robert Oppenheimer, Leo Szilard, and Enrico Fermi. Ben is less convinced but goes along with Ann as she gives the scientists a place to stay. She, as are most others, is most taken with Oppenheimer. A cult of personality forms around the scientists even as they try to get the government to acknowledge their existence and listen to their message of nuclear nonproliferation. Millet makes occasional swipes toward explaining the scientists’ reappearance, but for the most part they are taken as an unexplained natural phenomena which people interpret to fit their preconceived beliefs.

Oh Pure and Radiant Heart is a dark, brilliant novel by an author not afraid to look into our hearts and see our best and the worst. If the end is inevitable and unsurprising it is also commentary on our times that make it so.



Writer Rowe

Wed 8 Feb 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Apex Digest just posted their Feb. ish and the writer of the month is Christopher Rowe. Read an interview, a new short, “Queen of the Moon,” and, from Bittersweet Creek,Men of Renown.” Chunk of interview:

Apex: You publish a critically acclaimed small press magazine titled Say…. What are your thoughts about the supposed impending doom of the small press, and literary digests/zines in general?

C.Rowe: I hadn’t heard about the impending doom of the small press, just plenty of talk about the impending doom of the, well, I guess you’d call it the medium press now. Asimov’s, Analog, those guys if we’re talking about genre fiction magazines. And sure, those magazines are going to have to do something pretty drastic pretty quickly (luckily, I’m not in a position where I’m required to identify the something) to survive while looking anything like what they do now. As for the small press and literary magazines in general, pshaw. “This is the golden age of the small press.” Jim Minz, big deal New York editor, said that and he only lies about half the time.