No-Ka

Sat 30 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Lovely loverly blogosphere look at the the fun thing you have popped up for us: an expose of a chocolatier! Ha. Everybody is pointing to this story and it is worth reading. Poor No-Ka, soon No-business.



Endless Things galleys

Thu 28 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Proof (ahem) that John Crowley’s final Ægypt novel, Endless Things, exists, and is one more step along the road to being. These Advance Uncorrected Galleys just arrived (thanks UPS and Fidlar Doubleday!) and in the next couple of days will start to wend their way out to reviewers and so on.

It’s been 20 years since Ægypt was published and we know (from the fantastic number of pre-orders — yay!) that tons of people have been patiently waiting for this one to appear.
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Logo redux

Thu 28 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

And so the web did us more good than harm again and we did receive another set of logos, these all from Candace Bradbury-Carlin:

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The image “http://lcrw.net/images/logo/CBC-4.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. The image “http://lcrw.net/images/logo/CBC-5.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.



Lone Star Stories

Thu 28 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

LCRW 19In our great quest to become the number one consumers of chocolate bon-bons while lying on the couch reading comics and drinking champagne we have taken to selling off the pages of LCRW at exorbitant rates to anyone whose cheque book is big enough to take the hit.

Because we are such indolent proles, sometimes this doesn’t go as well as we’d like.* For instance, for LCRW 19 among the other lovelies spreading good word about Fictionary Devices and so on, there was the following ad for an online zine we have enjoyed more with each issue, Lone Star Stories. Those with Great eyesight may be able to see on the inside back cover where the ad should have gone. Were that PDF sent to the printer. It wasn’t. Eek! Sorry, Eric! Should be in the next one, but in the meantime, here it is:

Lone-Star-Stories.gif

* What we’d like is the bon-bon truck to come to the door once a day and someone cheery to refill the bon-bon tray and perhaps refill the record player with a new set of 78s. How we struggle with how to make this come to pass?!



Some LCRW stories in a book

Wed 27 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Thanks to Gwenda (and Meghan) for the reminder to post something about this.

Next November or so, in a stunning experiment in bindery, Del Rey editor Jim Minz will personally hand-sew* a collection (or, properly, an anthology) of stories (and so on and so forth) from Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. This anthology will not, however, be graced with any of the following titles:

  • God of Mars, Cadbury, Nestle, and Even Some Grown Up Chocolate Brand Maker Thingies
  • The New Yorker: Best Stories, 1996 – 2006
  • Wall, What Waaaaa? and Other Marathon Questions
  • Sliding into Home and a Sportsbag Full of Other Obliquely Misused Sports Metaphors
  • Ringtones of Glory: Poetry and Prose for Your Mobile! Kidz! Cool! Daddio? Myspace? A Little Help Reaching the HipsterKids Here? Bebo?
  • Minxes!
  • Celebrity Zine with the Stars!
  • Whistling in the Corner: 10 Years of Happy Penguin Stories
  • Weirdness Quotient: Bagel — 10 Years of Poisoned Mushroom Tales
  • A Little Bit Off the Left, Please: Twenty Years (Minus 10) of Damn, That’s Wacky Good Stuff
  • You Tube Used to be An Insult and Other Pithy Tales from PreHistory
  • Not Bad
  • Scene: Lady Zine Been Seen with Lean Queen and Mean Dean (Better Writing Inside)
  • Vidblogging the Wikipod: 10 Years of Rebelde, LCRW, and Metacafe
  • Actually Comes with Chocolate and Other Wonders from the Pages of LCRW, Perhaps the Only Zine Named After Jennie Jerome, Mother of Winston Churchill (and Editor of a Short-Lived Journal (The Anglo-Saxon Review) Which Was Beautiful and We Would Love a Full Set, Please)

Actual publicity notice picked up from Meghan from Publishers Marketplace:

Gavin Grant and Kelly Link’s UNDER THE RADAR: The Best of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, an anthology of the best fiction, nonfiction. and poetry that has appeared in the ‘zine, with an introduction by Dan Chaon and contributions from Karen Joy Fowler, Karen Russell, Jeffrey Ford, James Sallis, and Nalo Hopkinson, to Jim Minz at Del Rey, by Renee Zuckerbrot at Renee Zuckerbrot Literary Agency (NA).

Ta da!

*The contract lets Minz outsource a limited percentage of sewing to assistant editors (as long as he plies them with martinis) and should the book sell out** he will have the option to use a stapler on future printings.

** Isn’t any book a sell out? Discuss. Endlessly. Meanwhile, put some old people up against the wall. Use them to climb said wall. Take possession of the “palace”. Put the kettle on. Make a zine. Wonder what that disturbance in the garden. Wander outside with your now-somewhat-crumbly mates. Get put up against the wall. Offer them the “palace”in return for your life. Sigh as they explain (endlessly) that they’ll never sell out.
Could have been worse. You could have been born a Bush.



SBP logo

Tue 26 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

A long time ago (April 5, 2005) we posted this in our newsletter:

Possible logo
Ok, so we don’t have a logo, have never really felt the need for a logo, have rejected a couple of ideas, and laughed when we were told we’d disappear without one. We’re still here, right? You can see this? Is there anyo

Okay, so (reprise). Here’s the gig: make us a pretty Small Beer Press logo and we’ll hide it, ah, put it up somewhere on our site, put up a poll to see who likes
which one, and maybe at some point even use one. If we do use it we’ll pay you something (you like chocolate, right?). If we don’t, well, you had fun, right?

Below are a few of the logos sent in ages ago and never posted, sorry folks! Rich Stoehr, Brian Worley (#’s 2+3), and Beth Adele Long, are the artists. All of them captured something of the spirit of the concept: tasty comestibles are us. Thanks again everyone who took part.

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http://lcrw.net/images/logo/Worley-chocolate-bar.gif

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LCRW 19rs post fact ideation

Tue 26 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

At some point we asked our LCRW 19 contributors to send ideas for gifts they’d like to give or receive. Or, something (which thing does not have to be a Thing) that would be a good present to receive in January from someone who has gone and missed the whole darn holiday season. Not that we know anyone like that. Nope.

Updated with Laura’s somehow missed in the messy inbox.

Received:
3 grocery receipts totalling over $200
35 student essays: 19 on W.D. Snodgrass, 2 on Adrienne Rich, 2 on Ted Kooser (1 plaigiarized), 13 etc.
1165 calories in holiday chocolate, cheese, jam, and eggs at Investment Club Christmas Party
14 ideas to fix the public schools ranging from isolation to abandonment to inventing parents
1/12th share of 3 shares TM
2 whimpers from tired miniature dachsund long-haired terrier mix
a symphony on inconsolable grief through window from dog some blocks away, 1.5-2.5 hours in duration
1 (and only 1) glass Merlot
2 email; 1 confessing R.B.’s crush on E.D.; 1 requesting items received/desired

Pending or Desired:
breakfast in bed
1 student essay
the desire to walk around the block, sign up for Y yoga class, attend water aerobics, attempt health
elimination of poverty, mass education, behavioral training and awakening
dividend
12 whimpers from lively miniature dachsund long-haired terrier mix
silence
2 (or 2 1/2) glasses of Rioja
1 slice tortilla Espana
acceptance
—Laura Lee Washburn
I’d like someone to build me a home like Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s Hill House or his reconstructed townhouse in Glasgow. Sadly, it wouldn’t fit inside an Xmas stocking. Photoshop CS probably would, but no one I know has that kind of money. Alternatively, someone could buy me a view, a window programmed to show anyplace on earth. It could even become a mirror reflecting back a room I don’t actually live in, in a house I could never afford—like the master bedroom at Hill House. Unfortunately, such a view would also cost money, and would certainly be difficult to fit inside a stocking.
—Kara Kellar Bell

My wife and I never seem to get it together to write a “Christmas” letter in time for Christmas. So, taking a cue from my brother who at one time sent out “Ash Wednesday” letters to mock the whole holiday letter thing, we decided to call our Christmas letter a “New Year’s” letter and tried to get it out in January. Success! But only for that first year. Not meeting the January deadline the following year, we ranamed our missive an “Annual” letter, thinking that gave us several months to get it out to friends and relatives. That worked for a couple of years, but last year, although we eventually got around to writing something, we did not manage to get it out within the first half of the year and so embarrassment kept us from sending the letter out at all.
But now, with a letter in hand, we are thinking about recycling…our lives are pretty much the same from year to year, so who will know the difference?
—George Schaller

I’ve decided that I want a set of bagpipes for Christmas this year. I heard them playing in Edinburgh this summer, bagpipes, attached to guys in kilts, a basket for money in front of them, awaiting a Euro here, a Euro there. The music was beautiful.
That’s not the real reason I covet bagpipes. I started playing guitar when I was 10 years old. I would have been a very successful musician except for one thing: I lack talent. My son started playing guitar when he was 10 years old and after the first hour I could tell that he would be better than I ever hoped to be. Similar things happened with the piano.
My son went on to get a B.A. in music.
I want to be able to play an instrument that my son can’t play better than I can. I will practice and lock the bagpipes in the closet when my son visits. I don’t want a repeat of that ugly Thanksgiving meal in 1998, when I played a number that I’d been practicing for three months on the harmonica. I showed my son how the scale was organized on the harmonica. By the end of the night, he was playing Beethoven’s sixth symphony on it, and an early Grateful Dead number, all from memory.
So, to draw this story to a conclusion, I will admit that I’m going to buy bagpipes on the internet, and give it to my wife to give to me for Christmas.
—Dennis Nau

This Non-Denominational Gift Giving Season, I would very much like to receive harmonicas in any natural minor or harmonic minor key. As for those who miss the season entirely, I suggest the give the gift of bees. Giving bees clearly communicates the core message: “It was no accident that I failed to give you a Christmas, Chanukah or Kwanzaa present.”
—David Erik Nelson

I’m thinking of giving my mother a ride in hot air balloon over the Arizona desert this year. The balloon will be red and green and yellow and the basket will brown wicker, and everything will be so high and quiet up there above the bugs. The Saguaro cacti will stand around with their hands up. She’ll be able to see her house in Phoenix in one direction and way over there the house where I grew up, with rolling hills, mesas, and a couple of deep canyons between the two. The Gila River, the Superstition Mountains, the town of Globe where there is both a Serbian and a Croatian cemetery.
—Ray Vukcevich

I’ll confess that I’ve been bothered by the cupie doll nature of this seasonal gift-giving, and all its bows and wrappings that send beautiful, toxic flames up the chimney. I’m giving Mountains Beyond Mountains, by Tracy Kidder, about the remarkable Dr. Paul Farmer and his personal war against AIDS and multi resistant TB in the poorest places in the world, centered in Haiti. The man, the stories, Kidder’s writing, all wonderful. Restores faith in what we can be; it was all I could do, when I finished the book, to not stop everything and go help this man and Ophelia Dahl, Roald Dahl’s daughter. So folded into the copy of the book, I’m also giving donations to their Partner’s In Health in the name of the people I’m giving the book to.
I’m also interested in receiving such gifts. There is so much suffering, think what $30, multiplied by the millions of desperate gift givers, could do in the right hands.
A government of the people, for the people and by the people would be nice.
—Diane Gordon



James Brown, RIP

Tue 26 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Damn. Look at those feet move. Missed this due to viruses, visitors (& helping Santa out of the blocked chimney), etc. Among other things passed back and forward: Bees and Trees from Heifer.

No snow yet although flurries are promised. Global warming, we see you not. Much.

Hope y’all had fun wherever you were.



We were just mobbed in Venice, sweetie.

Sat 23 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin



Wed 20 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | 5 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

— An interview with Neil Williamson (author of a collection worth tracking down The Ephemera).

Magic for Beginners hits another couple of year’s best lists: Seattle Times, (“odd, absorbing, fantasy stories”) and Nancy Pearl, librarian extraordinaire (list, listen). “If you do nothing else, read the title story…. It’s like looking at an M.C. Escher drawing…. It’s just a fabulous story, so don’t miss Kelly Link.” [Nancy also picks out Kevin Brockmeier, Susannah Clarke, Elizabeth Strout, etc.]– Lovely literary bookmarks by Eddie Campbell (sorry, forget where the link came from).

— See you at KGB tonight.

The Scotsman reports on a BBC Scotland radio show they’re dubbing “the Scottish Simpsons“.

— Old Earth Books has a new release date (March) for their Howard Waldrop collection, THINGS WILL NEVER BE THE SAME: Selected Short Fiction, 1980 – 2005.

— Some pix of Venice — many more to follow.

— Also: an interview with M.T. Anderson (thx Gwenda).

— Just received: a new issue of the Fairy Tale Review and from Dean Francis Alfar, Philippine Speculative Fiction Vol.2 (Kestrel), The Digest of Philippine Genre Stories, and Story Philippines.



Wed 20 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

— An interview with Neil Williamson (author of a collection worth tracking down The Ephemera).

Magic for Beginners hits another couple of year’s best lists: Seattle Times, (“odd, absorbing, fantasy stories”) and Nancy Pearl, librarian extraordinaire (list, listen). “If you do nothing else, read the title story…. It’s like looking at an M.C. Escher drawing…. It’s just a fabulous story, so don’t miss Kelly Link.” [Nancy also picks out Kevin Brockmeier, Susannah Clarke, Elizabeth Strout, etc.]– Lovely literary bookmarks by Eddie Campbell (sorry, forget where the link came from).

— See you at KGB tonight.

The Scotsman reports on a BBC Scotland radio show they’re dubbing “the Scottish Simpsons“.

— Old Earth Books has a new release date (March) for their Howard Waldrop collection, THINGS WILL NEVER BE THE SAME: Selected Short Fiction, 1980 – 2005.

— Some pix of Venice — many more to follow.

— Also: an interview with M.T. Anderson (thx Gwenda).

— Just received: a new issue of the Fairy Tale Review and from Dean Francis Alfar, Philippine Speculative Fiction Vol.2 (Kestrel), The Digest of Philippine Genre Stories, and Story Philippines.



Cleveland gets DeNiro

Thu 14 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

— Added an exciting reading: Alan DeNiro will read with Christopher Barzak and Sean Thomas Dougherty on Jan. 4 at Mac’s Backs in Cleveland Heights. Great store, we love doing events there. Don’t forget to eat at Tommy’s next door. Yum. (Reading calendar.)

— Also, John Kessel took a look at Alan’s book in F&SF:

About fifteen years ago, in an essay I wrote comparing sf and mainstream fiction, I quoted Raymond Carver’s assertion that short stories are more like poems than novels. I protested that you would be hard pressed to find more than a handful of sf stories published every year of which this was true.

I don’t think that’s true anymore.

— Nice little story about another fave bookshop (we have so many…): Malaprop‘s in Asheville. Which is very near Salsa’s. Ah, the food of the traveling days. Malaprop’s also picked Magic for Beginners as one of their faves of 2006.
— Elsewhere: an interview with Kelly Link by Bat Segundo. (Download.)

— And: a review of Julie Phillips’s biography of Alice Sheldon. (This was necessarily foreshortened to fit the space available. What can you do?)

Besides all the other great reviews The Double Life… received, it was just picked as a Salon Book of the Year and there’s an interview with Julie here.



Tiny rapido Italia report

Wed 13 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Last week, due to the amazing work of Marta Donzelli (editor at Donzelli editore who are publishing Strangers Things Happen and Magic for Beginners) and the US Ambassador’s office, Kelly was invited to read in Turin and Rome in Italy. It was a brilliant but molto rapido week. We took the train down to Venice (a beautiful and surreal consensual illusion between tourists and the small permanent population); up to Turin (cars! arcades! book shops!); and then seven hours back to Rome (a city beyond parenthetical comments).Kelly read in Turin — the World Book Capital from April ’06 to April ’07. She was introduced and translated by sarcastic artistic bon vivant Luca Scarlini, one of the organizers of the Turin Book Festival and the Book Capital, who travels so much that his studio in Florence (where he keeps 35,000+ books) is the closest thing he has to a home. (Not that he wants one. “It’s too boring to be trapped in the one place all the time!”)

Piu Libre, Piu Liberi in Rome is nominally the Italian “Small Press Fair.” But many of the preses there were akin to Donzelli who do 90 books a year and have (after ~15 years) about 1,000 titles in print. The fair was huge, packed, inspiring. Thousands of people thronged the floors of the exhibit halls and shopped for books, hundreds of authors were on hand — magnificent. The New York Small Press Center book fair last week was fun; this was tremendous. Kelly was interviewed on one of the national radio stations (with a simultaneous translator) along with Diana Evans (winner of the 2005 Orange Prize for New Writers). Then rushed off to a panel where she, her translator, Riccardo Duranti of the University of Rome, and Sara Antonelli (and Bruna, the amazing simultaneous translator) went at it again. Then there were a whole bunch of radio and TV interviews—all the while giving us a chance to see the Donzelli team in action at the fair. (Kelly’s book was popular but their new translation of the Arabian Nights, the first new one in many years, was getting a ton of publicity and selling like hotcakes).

Actually posted some pix (statues! pigeons!) and a quick interview with Marta about Italian publishing (now below).

We didn’t have enough time to do anything: we’ll have to go back. There’s supposed to be another big bookfair in summer in Rome….

— A short with Marta Donzelli — filmed in the basement of the expo center as it was the only relatively quiet spot:



Really?

Fri 1 Dec 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Crowley, Endless ThingsJohn Crowley let us know that our May publication date may be in jeopardy:

I’ve written a couple of extra chapters for Endless Things that will need extensive editing. I also am thinking of dropping every other page, so a certain amount of stitchery joining the remainig pages will be required. I do feel these changes will help the book. They will only take an additional couple of months.

Also, we are working on methods of invisibly numbering the copies as Crowley requested.

One reader has already noticed that this book concerns “Pierce Moffitt” rather than “Pierce Moffett.” This change of chief protagonist, this alternate take on reality, this deepening of coincedence and the magical similarities in the life of Moffitt to Moffett’s (as recounted in three prior volumes) proves Crowley’s mastery of the form and future of the novel and will be a welcome surprise to the longtime readers who are rushing to pre-order this title.

Or: 1) Not really. 2) Invisible numbering? Sure. 3) Oops! That gaff has been fixed.



Next week: Italy

Thu 30 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Kelly Link will be at a couple of book festivals in Italy next week thanks to the good people at Donzelli editore — who published Stranger Things Happen in Italian — and the American Embassy there.
But, first, on the morning of Dec. 7th she will teach a class at the SCUOLA HOLDEN (yes, named after that Holden). Then she will read at 18 (6 PM) at the Atrium in Piazza Solferino.

On the 9th at 16 (4 PM) she will read at the Rome Book Fair, being introduced by Riccardo Duranti, her translator, and Alessandro Portelli, a leading Italian scholar of American Literature.

Invites to the readings are below! Wish us luck. It will be scattered showers all week, but we don’t care as it will be 60 degrees and We Will Be in Italy!

Earlier we mentioned that we’d post some PDFs of an interview piece with Kelly from an Italian magazine. At last here they are. Go see for the fabby art. They’re large-ish files but can be downloaded here: Contents page, title page, interview1, interview2.
The image “http://www.lcrw.net/images/Link_Roma.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
http://www.lcrw.net/images/Link_Torino.jpg



Thu 30 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Just posted a new newsletter. Which contains secrets. It starts like this:

First: Happy St. Andrew’s Day! Get your kilt on, your flask filled, find a partner, and get out on the dancefloor. Scots Wha Hae an’ a’ that an’ a’  that.

Not sure about the dancing? How about raising a glass to Colin Beattie. Who? Alisdair Gray has a blog where he occasionally posts letters and so on. He just posted a wonderful history of the Oran Mor pub (which is a place of beauty due in no small part to Gray’s paintings) which Beattie bought in 2002.

Not such a good thing going on a wee bit south of Scotland. Anyone passionate about theatre and theatre history, please take a minute to add your name to the growing petition to challenge the closing of the Theatre Museum in Covent Garden.

VQR has a bandwagon. The fall issue: whew.

Mistype of the day: Skinny Dipping in the Kale of the Dead.



Thu 30 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Just posted a new newsletter. Which contains secrets. It starts like this:

First: Happy St. Andrew’s Day! Get your kilt on, your flask filled, find a partner, and get out on the dancefloor. Scots Wha Hae an’ a’ that an’ a’  that.

Not sure about the dancing? How about raising a glass to Colin Beattie. Who? Alisdair Gray has a blog where he occasionally posts letters and so on. He just posted a wonderful history of the Oran Mor pub (which is a place of beauty due in no small part to Gray’s paintings) which Beattie bought in 2002.

Not such a good thing going on a wee bit south of Scotland. Anyone passionate about theatre and theatre history, please take a minute to add your name to the growing petition to challenge the closing of the Theatre Museum in Covent Garden.

VQR has a bandwagon. The fall issue: whew.

Mistype of the day: Skinny Dipping in the Kale of the Dead.



Bloggery

Mon 27 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Did you know there are now more (interesting) blogs than there are minutes in the day? Darn.
Ever feel you are living in a secret history? See the Eos blog where they’ve posted a conversation between John Crowley, Jeff Ford, Tim Powers, and James Morrow. Parts: Two, Three.
Chris Nakashima-Brown and a number of other Texan-area writers claim they have No Fear of the Future.

Texans, even those who move there, like the stance-based blog title, a good example being Maureen McHugh’s No Feeling of Falling. Go for the recipes, stay for the pictures, subscribe for continued happiness.



Dec. 2-3, NYC

Mon 27 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

We will be here:

The Independent and Small Press Book Fair, Saturday, December 2nd (10-6 PM) and Sunday, December 3rd (11-5 PM), at the Small Press Center, at 20 West 44th street, between 5th and 6th Avenues in midtown Manhattan. ([email protected] · 212.764.7021)

With over one hundred of the nation’s top indie presses, and over 28 free public programs featuring some of New York’s top political and avant-garde literary writers, the Independent and Small Press Book Fair is one of the most groundbreaking independent publishing events of the year.

This year’s Fair will be featuring some of the countries’ most cutting-edge presses, including: Akashic Books, AK Press, Allworth Press, Archipelago, Coffee House Press, Contemporary Press, Disinformation, The Feminist Press, Gingko Press, Haymarket Books, Ig Publishing, McPherson & Company, Melville House Press, Nation Books, The New Press, Ocean Press, PEN American, Persea Books, Seven Stories Press, Seven Locks Press, Small Beer Press, Soft Skull Press, The Smith and many, many more.

Some of the authors being featured at this year’s Fair include: Dore Ashton, Amiri Baraka, Jen Benka, Jennifer Baumgardner, Phong Bui, Colin Channer, T. Cooper, Michael Cunningham, Luis Francia, Steve Freeman, Matthea Harvey, Elizabeth Holtzman, Emily Jenkins, Caren Lissner, Lauren Baratz-Logsted, Jaime Manrique, Joe Meno, Jonas Mekas, Mark Crispin Miller, Eileen Myles, Greg Palast, Ed Park, Rachel Pine, Peter Plate, Katha Pollitt, Paul Robeson, Jr., Eyal Press, Dan Simon, Martha Southgate, David Levi Strauss, Monique Truong, Anne Waldman, Nation Books, PEN American, and much more…

Also, to help kick off this very exciting event, the Independent and Small Press Book Fair, in conjunction with Akashic Books & Seven Stories Press, will be hosting a Pre-Book-Fair Fiesta, on Friday, December 1st, from 8-11 p.m., at KGB Bar, on 85 E. 4th Street, at 2nd Ave in the East Village. Please come and join us for a round of drinks to celebrate Independent Publishing and the writers who publish with them!!! Please note that as a preliminary to the party, acclaimed authors Joe Meno and Peter Plate will be reading at Barnes & Noble Astor Place, at 7p.m.



Signed Waldrops; Suggestion Plea

Tue 21 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , , , | 1 Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Howard Who?During a brief sidetrip to Texas (where a bunch of plausible fabulists were gathered and wondering where a certain Mr. B. Rosenbaum was {Swizzerland, it seems}), we asked a boon of Mr. Howard Waldrop. He consented (when approached with ice cream and beer: Texans!) to apply his signature to his book. Huzzah, we announced, to the surprised gila monsters everywhere. Huzzah.

Then we returned to Gueros again. For: verily, the tacos are unbeatable. Also, Las Manitas. Oh, the joy that was in our hearts, even as it was enspicened by the knowledge that we would have to leave this city of joyous eats and head away, away.

Even Joe’s Cafe was a place of wonders in this time of joy. (Joy especial as the fabulist gathering was on the edge of the City of Great Foods so to be in the center was akin to being the chocolaty center of a bon bon.) There, and a few other places, we were able to speak with Mr. N-B (interviewed here) whom, should you get the opportunity to see him read, you should take as he is, really, quite wonnerful.

Eventually retured to the Small Beer HQ and enstrengthened by our collection of Waldropian Signatures (for he is Mighty with his pen or typewriter), we are making these books, this debut collection, Howard Who? which is its name, available for sale.

Lo, it is done.

Other titles we have signed copies of: many. Move thy clickity thingy over here to see. (Kelly Link, Ellen Kushner, Alan DeNiro, Carol Emshwiller).

Now your turn: Please send us Suggestions for what kind of sale we should put on this year. Suggestions welcome by email or in the comments below.

Other tiny updates: everywhere on our site. Because the paper in the office it overwhelming, of course.

Alan is reading at the Erie Bookstore on Dec. 30th at 2 PM. Drop by and see him!

Added links to a couple more audio recordings (almost like podcasts!) of Kelly (or readers reading Kelly’s stories) here — includes a Real Audio (oh well) file from November 2005 from Prairiie Lights where she read “Monster.”

Kelly also got a nice mention in this piece about short stories by Kevin Sampsell (micro emperor!).



Preorder FAQ

Mon 20 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., , | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Q. Can I preorder 2007 books?

A. Yes, you can.

Q. Books. Hmm. Don’t they have authors?
A. Sometimes. These ones we’re working on are new novels by John Crowley, Elizabeth Hand, Laurie J. Marks, and Interfictions: an Anthology of Interstitial Writing, edited by Theodora Goss and Delia Sherman. A little more about the books is available on the preorder page. The covers below are for galleys and will change somewhere between a lot and a little before publication.

Q. And were there artists involved with the covers or did they just fall from the sky?

A. Yes on the former. Liz Hand’s cover is by Jacob McMurray; John Crowley’s features a Rosamund Purcell photograph, and the Interfictions features a photo of a box made (in all senses of the word) by Connie Toebe.
More to come on these as the months slip and stutter by until Bang! suddenly it will be April, the snow will turn to rain, and these books will be getting out there to bookshops. The excitement! The design*! The shipping complications! The paper weights! Wait. The text, baby, the text.

Hand, Generation Loss Crowley, Endless Things Marks, Water Logic Interfictions



LCRW 19

Sun 19 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

lcrw wrestles with itselfIt really is time for something about the newest, the latest, the tomorrow it’s coming before you know and the Hot New Thing is Here issue of LCRW. Aka #19. Aka The Tenth Anniversary Issue. Or: the one with wrestlers on the cover. (That Nifty Cover is by Eric Schaller.)

Hand-crafted in small batches by the printsmiths of Paradise Copies, LCRW 19 is a wafty number with stretchy impulses and chocolate overtones. Paired with a leg of lamb it asks where the other three legs and the body are; mixed with sherry, it is a (…) trifle heavy.

Fiction Yes. Pushcart nominees? Yes. But you’ll find out about them the same time you always have (ie not until the pieces get picked for the anthology. Not yet, no. One of these days? Sure). This issue contains fiction about birds, brides, bath(tubs), and, yes, wrestlers by fave writers such as Ray Vukcevich and Carol Emshwiller as well as new-to-these-pages peeps such as Daniel Rabuzzi and Katherine Beutner.

Nonfiction? Yes. A little. Dear Aunt Gwenda comes through. Phew.

Poetry? Yes.

Celebrations?Memories of those early years? The lost issues? No.
Subscription and store copies will mail out this week due to the management and the shippers’ new agreement on tea breaks, leaf raking, and chocolate supplies. The choice of a Dove dark chocolate bar for subscribers and shippers was roundly pooh-poohed by management, the shippers, and representatives from the Small Magazine Subscribers Local 44. Reports that management was later seen muching through a 48-count case of Dove’s new dark chocolate bars were denied by management and sniggered at by the shippers.

Chances of a party to celebrate this 10th anniversary ish are average to rainy.



Octavian Everything

Thu 16 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing: Traitor to the Nation: Volume One, The Pox Party CoverIn our usual post-literate manner: Yay! And: Good Golly.

The ABA claims M.T. Anderson received the National Book Award last night for The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing: Traitor to the Nation: Volume One, The Pox Party.

Numerous other internetty places confirm it, so it must be true: yay again!

Last night we were at McIntyre’s Books in Pittsboro, NC, where Kelly read to a nice wee crowd and Beth (hello Beth!) drew a monkey face in our book and we (hopefully) persuaded her to read above said book which is too rich and too smart for us to write about. Just go pick it up and read it!



Elsewhere on the web:

Mon 13 Nov 2006 - Filed under: Not a Journal., | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

Did we ever post these? No. Ooops. Been working on our MySpaceShip page. (It will be shiny, shiny, shiny! The spaceship. Not the page. Which will not ever exist. Until it does.)

Actually, we have been driving (hence everything being slow) and being awestruck at the devastated New Orleans. Democrats who just gained power: get to work.
— — —

Ain’t it Cool News takes on the challenge of Alan‘s collection.
Gwenda pointed us to our next car. Not saying which one.
Richard points toward this Flickr set of an ancient zine:

“The first issue of the magazine produced inside the WWI camp for English POWs in Germany. My grandfather, Sol Geduld, was the German-born son of a British subject (Harris Geduld) and put in Ruhleben at the age of 8 in the year 1915 where he lived for one year until he was traded with his father in exchange for two German prisoners.”

A recent note from the lovely folk in Cauheegan and Seattle (that would be Payseur & Schmidt — join their list at [email protected]), informed us of a few lovely oddities slipping out into the world:

John Clute and 30 Amazing Illustrators – The Darkening Garden: A Lexicon of Horror

The wait is over. Our second beautiful hardcover book is back from the printers and ready to ship. Those of you who pre-ordered will be getting your copies very soon. If you haven’t pre-ordered, now’s your chance to own this stunning, limited-edition book. John Clute explores the darker side of the fantastic with 30 motifs of horror, each accompanied by a full page illustration from a talented artist, illustrator, or designer. This material will eventually be incorporated into the author’s not-yet-published scholarly opus, The Encyclopedia of the Fantastic. 170 pages, casebound, signed and numbered by the author, and limited to 500 copies. $45.00

Postcards of Doom

This exclusive set of 30 lovely postcards highlights the hot young illustrators and artists who grace the pages of John Clute’s Darkening Garden. Printed by Payseur & Schmidt’s specialty printing pals thingmakers.net, this postcard set is housed in a deluxe die-cut box (which itself is illustrated by Adam Grano.) Limited to 300 numbered sets. $20.00

Therese Littleton – Teeth

A story of genetic transformation, interspecies conflict, and fresh seafood by Therese Littleton, author of A Case for Cannibalism and The Diving Belle. Signed and numbered limited edition of 125. 18 pages. Deluxe screen printed jacket. Each hand-stitched chapbook comes with a unique souvenir shark’s tooth. $10 plus shipping.

The shark’s tooth is a real eye-catcher, as it were.



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