Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 17

Tue 1 Nov 2005 - Filed under: LCRW | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

$5 · 60 pages

See Scribd preview below.

Gavin J. Grant: Allergic to you. Yes, you.
Kelly Link: Catches birds.
Jedediah Berry: Leaves bootprints in loam.
Gwyneth Merner: Says it on the radio.
Erik Gallant: Orchestral arrangements, handclaps.

fiction
Seana Graham — The Pirate’s True Love
Philip Raines and Harvey Welles — All The Things She Wanted
Christien Gholson — You Accept What You Get When You’re Eating with Death
Alette J. Willis — Daylighting the Donwell River
Deborah Roggie — The Mushroom Duchess
David Connerley Nahm — “Discrete Mathematics” by Olaf and Lemeaux; Or, the Severed Hand
Diana Pharaoh Francis — Native Spinsters
John Brown — Bright Waters

poetry
Marly Youmans — The Fire Girl
Peter Dabbene — SHH

nonfiction
A Lack — Throughout
You Could Do This Too — Marginalia

cover photos
Sam MacArthur

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Storyteller: Writing Lessons from 27 years of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop
Bone Wars
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people

John Brown wrote the first draft of “Bright Waters” in Orson Scott Card’s Literary Bootcamp. Having lived in the Netherlands, he has a particular affection for the hero of this story. John won first prize in the Writers of the Future (13) under the name Bo Griffin. He is currently at work on an epic fantasy novel about a boy, a girl, and a wayward monster. He now lives in the hinterlands of Utah.

Peter Dabbene is a Trenton, NJ-based writer. Several of his short plays have been produced in Philadelphia theaters. Most recently, some of his short stories have been published online at Parenthetical Note and Eyeshot. He has also published two collections of short stories, Prime Movements and Glossolalia, as well as a novel, Mister Dreyfus’ Demons.

Diana Pharaoh Francis is the author of fantasy novels Path of Fate (nominated for the Mary Roberts Rinehart Award) and Path of Honor. Path of Blood, which will complete the trilogy, will be published May 2006 by NAL/Roc. Diana is an assistant editor for The Broadsheet. She holds a BA & MA in creative writing, and a PhD in Literature and Theory. She currently teaches at the University of Montana-Western and is madly at work on her next novel.

Christien Gholson‘s stories, poems and translations (of Rimbaud’s Illuminations) have appeared in Hanging Loose, The Sun, Big Scream, Blue Mesa Review, etc. He grew up in Southern Belgium and Northern Florida — places where the creatures inside a Bosch painting are very comfortable. A book of prose-poems (Faces in the Gallery) is forthcoming from Hanging Loose Press, along with a chapbook (Phenomenology) from March Street Press.

Seana Graham is a bookseller in Santa Cruz, California and a closet scribbler of long standing. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Red Wheelbarrow Literary Magazine and Eclipse. LCRW is the first zine she’s been published in, and she believes appearing here will significantly help her ‘coolness quotient’ — that is, if anything actually can.

How do we get our stories? We start with the set of people who read. Then we split out those who write with a butter knife (or some other blunt instrument). From these we filter out those who write well (and can hold their breath under water). Lastly we ask our neighbors to bury the stories in the garden for at least one season. We print whatever stories might still be legible.

David Connerley Nahm lives in Carrboro, NC. He has a wife with a cat named Typee, a band named Audubon Park, and is halfway to a law degree. Sometimes, he performs stand-up comedy. His story “Sitting on a Bench in the Park” appeared in LCRW #14. Please visit the Tropic of Food if so inclined.

On Selling Out: Yes, we will, thank you. Would we take the opportunity of having a larger platform to throw our zine (re-imagined as glossy with chocolate-bar pullouts and ads for the latest solar cars) out from into the reading masses? Offers to the usual address.

Phil Raines and Harvey Welles have had stories published in Albedo One, Leading Edge, On Spec, Aurealis and New Genre as well as the recent collection of new Scottish fantastic fiction, Novia Scotia. Their stories have been anthologised in The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror, including “The Fishie,” which was published in LCRW no. 12. Philip lives in Glasgow, Scotland, and is a member of the Glasgow Science Fiction Writers Circle. Harvey lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Deborah Roggie writes fantasy and lives in New Jersey with her husband and 15-year-old son. Her story “The Enchanted Trousseau” first appeared in LCRW no. 14 and was selected for the anthology Fantasy: The Best of 2004. Forthcoming stories include “Thievery,” in the anthology Eidolon, and “Swansdown” (Realms of Fantasy). She is currently working on a novel.

Marly Youmans is the author of six books. The most recent are Ingledove (FSG), a young adult/crossover fantasy set in the Southern Appalachians, and Claire, a book of poetry (Louisiana State UP). Her novel, The Wolf Pit (FSG), won the Michael Shaara Award. Marly, her husband, and three children live in a snow castle mere spitting distance from the Baseball Hall of Fame and the grave of James Fenimore Cooper in the semi-fictional Yankee village of Cooperstown.

Alette J. Willis writes from Canada.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet looks at the number 17, November 2005, and decides it probably will go on. This zine goes out June-ish and November-ish from Small Beer Press, 176 Prospect Ave., Northampton, MA 01060. [email protected] www.lcrw.net/lcrw $5 per single issue or $20/4. Various other money-laundering offers available by the dollar, pound, kilo, etc. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. We reserve the right to squander the opportunities presented by quarterly publication. We reserve the right to live up to the Occasional Outburst subtitle which seems to have been tossed in the rejection pile somewhere along the way. Submissions, requests for guidelines, &c all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Thanks for reading. These days what we have. Are we doing as much as we could? Of course we’re all busy, but is it just makework? What’s the overall contribution to the Actual and Perceived Contentment Index? Printed by Paradise Copies, 30 Craft Ave., Northampton, MA01060 413-585-0414
Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 17 ebook



Mockingbird

Thu 15 Sep 2005 - Filed under: Books | Leave a Comment| Posted by: intern

Also Available: Perfect Circle

“Witty, wicked, and wise. Wonderful!”
— Karen Joy Fowler, The Jane Austen Book Club

“A wonderfully vivid and unexpected blend of magic realism and finely-observed contemporary experience.”
— William Gibson, Pattern Recognition

Sometimes you have to go back home.

Elena Beauchamp used magic the way other people used credit cards, and now that she’s dead, her daughters Toni and Candy have a debt to pay. Set in modern-day Houston, Texas, this is a funny and moving novel of voodoo, pregnancy, and family ties. While Toni sorts out the mess that Elena left behind, she must also come to terms with her childhood and with the supernatural and dangerous gift that she has inherited from her mother.

Mockingbird: A novel of voodoo, pregnancy, and Houston.

With a new Afterword by the author · New York Times Notable Book · World Fantasy and Nebula Award Finalist

Reviews

“Sally started [reading Mockingbird] first, and realized right away that she was onto something good. When she finished, she confiscated the book I was reading at the time and put Mockingbird in my hands. Didn’t take me long to figure out why. For a soft book year, I’ve still managed to read some good books since January, but Mockingbird is hands down the best novel I have read in 2005, and one of the best I’ve ever had the privilege to read.” — Park Road Books, Charlotte, NC

Mockingbird is the story of a young woman who grudgingly inherits her mother’s psychic powers. This book reads like a shot of whiskey — sweet, fiery swirls in the throat that linger on.” — Mary-Jo, Powells.com

“One of the most enjoyable books of the year.” — San Francisco Chronicle

“Earthily charming and hilarious.” — Booklist

“Humor and a Southern sauciness. . . . [Stewart’s] poignant take on voodoo among middle-class women makes for delicious fun.” — Publishers Weekly

“A gentle, funny, affirming novel. . . . Stewart writes beautifully and affectionately about this family and their acquaintances, friends, and business partners. Like a poet with a cattle prod, he crafts his phrasing carefully, then rocks the reader back on his heels with an insight or an insult.” — San Diego Union-Tribune

“Stewart’s best, most perfectly balanced novel yet. . . . a small masterpiece. Stewart’s control of tone is nothing short of brilliant; Toni’s no-nonsense Texas narrative voice immediately disarms us with its tall-tale overtones and its authentic (and genuinely funny) humor. . . . A work of genuine brilliance.”
— Locus

Read this novel and for days afterward you’ll start conversations with, “I just read the strangest book.” When Elena died, her daughter, Toni, unwillingly inherited her voodoo dolls and her debts. The dolls are able to exert their supernatural effects on Toni when she least expects it which creates havoc on the lives of family and friends. Candy, the other daughter, has her own life to live and just hovers on the outer edge of Toni’s life, offering support when needed. This is a lively and highly original story which I will recommend to my reading group because it’s a good book and they’ll enjoy it.
— Andra Tracy, Out Word Bound Bookstore, Indianapolis, IN

Sean  StewartAbout the Author:

Sean Stewart is the author of the I Love Bees and Beast search operas, two short stories and seven novels: Perfect Circle, The Night Watch, Nobody’s SonClouds End,Passion Play, Resurrection Man and Galveston. He wrote much of the innovative web game associated with the film A.I. With Jordan Weisman, he is the author of Cathy’s Book. His novels have received the Aurora, Arthur Ellis, Sunburst, Canadian Library, and World Fantasy awards. He lives in Davis, CA, with his wife and two daughters.

Author photo by Biko.
Download for print.

Cover

Photographs: “Carol Emshwiller” by Emsh.
Mockingbird painting by Elaine Chen. (Nominated for a 2006 Prix Aurora Award — Artistic Achievement.)



Travel Light – Chapters One and Two

Mon 15 Aug 2005 - Filed under: Free Stuff to Read, Novel Excerpts | Leave a Comment| Posted by: intern

Chapter 1
The Bears

Travel LightIt is said that when the new Queen saw the old Queen’s baby daughter, she told the King that the brat must be got rid of at once. And the King, who by now had almost forgotten the old Queen and had scarcely looked at the baby, agreed and thought no more about it. And that would have been the end of that baby girl, but that her nurse, Matulli, came to hear of it. Now this nurse was from Finmark, and, like many another from thereabouts, was apt to take on the shape of an animal from time to time. So she turned herself into a black bear then and there and picked up the baby in her mouth, blanket and all, and growled her way out of the Bower at the back of the King’s hall, and padded out through the light spring snow that had melted already near the hall, and through the birch woods and the pine woods into the deep dark woods where the rest of the bears were waking up from their winter sleep.

Read more



Travel Light

Mon 15 Aug 2005 - Filed under: Books, Peapod Classics | Leave a Comment| Posted by: intern

978-1-931520-14-0, trade paper · 978-1-61873-006-0, ebook
First printing: August 2005
Second printing: November 2016

Read an interview with Naomi Mitchison from April 1989.

Read the new Introduction.

Read the first two chapters.

Travel Light is a short, fabulous book that transports readers from a cave in the forest to a dragon’s lair to the wonders of early Constantinople. It is dense yet light, happy, deep, sad, amazing, and short enough that once it’s read all at once you’ll have time to read it again.

The second novel in our Peapod Classics reprint line is Travel Light, the tale of a marvelous journey by the late Naomi Mitchison. We’ve been fans of both the author and this novel for years — although we never got to meet her. Back in June 2001 (long before this reprint line was ever imagined) Gavin J. Grant wrote a short piece for F&SF on Travel Light:

“… a wonderful story that will transport you into Halla’s world where a basilisk might be met in the desert, heroes are taken to Valhalla by Valkyries, and a fortune might be made with a word to the right horse.”

Reviews:

Travel Light is the story of Halla, a girl born to a king but cast out onto the hills to die. She lives among bears; she lives among dragons. But the time of dragons is passing, and Odin All-Father offers Halla a choice: Will she stay dragonish and hoard wealth and possessions, or will she travel light?”
—Amal El-Mohtar, NPR, You Must Read This

“A 78-year-old friend staying at my house picked up Travel Light, and a few hours later she said, ‘Oh, I wish I’d known there were books like this when I was younger!’ So, read it now—think of all those wasted years!”
—Ursula K. Le Guin, author of A Wizard of Earthsea

“The enchantments of Travel Light contain more truth, more straight talking, a grittier, harder-edged view of the world than any of the mundane descriptions of daily life you will find in … science fiction stories.”
— Paul Kincaid, SF Site

“A gem of a book.”
— Strange Horizons

“Every page is full of magic and wonder….well worth seeking out.”— Rambles

“Combines the best of Rowling and Pullman, being full of magic and fantasy with the hard edge of reality sharp at its edges.”
— The New Review/LauraHird.com

— Genevieve Valentine

“Disarmingly familiar, like a memory only half-recalled. You will love this book.”
— Holly Black (Valiant, The Spiderwick Chronicles)

Praise for Naomi Mitchison:

“No one knows better how to spin a fairy tale than Naomi Mitchison.” — The Observer

“Mitchison breathes life into such perennial themes as courage, forgiveness, the search for meaning, and self-sacrifice.”—Publishers Weekly

“She writes enviably, with the kind of casual precision which … comes by grace.” — Times Literary Supplement

“One of the great subversive thinkers and peaceable transgressors of the twentieth century…. We are just catching up to this wise, complex, lucid mind that has for ninety-seven years been a generation or two ahead of her time.” — Ursula K. Le Guin, author of Gifts

“Her descriptions of ritual and magic are superb; no less lovely are her accounts of simple, natural things — water-crowfoot flowers, marigolds, and bright-spotted fish. To read her is like looking down into deep warm water, through which the smallest pebble and the most radiant weed shine and are seen most clearly; for her writing is very intimate, almost as a diary, or an autobiography is intimate, and yet it is free from all pose, all straining after effect; she is telling a story so that all may understand, yet it has the still profundity of a nursery rhyme.”
— Hugh Gordon Proteus, New Statesman and Nation

Publication history

First published in the UK by Faber and Faber in 1952.

Reprinted: Virago Press, 1985; Penguin, 1987.

About the Author:

Naomi Mitchison, author of over 70 books, died in 1999 at the age of 101. She was born in and lived in Scotland but traveled widely throughout the world. In the 1960s she was adopted as adviser and mother of the Bakgatla tribe in Botswana. Her books include historical fiction, science fiction, poetry, autobiography, and nonfiction, the most popular of which are The Corn King and the Spring Queen, The Conquered, and Memoirs of a Spacewoman.

Read the New York Times obituary — including this hilarious correction: “An obituary on Saturday about Naomi Mitchison, the British writer and early feminist, misspelled the surname of the Labor Party leader at whom she once threw a half-plucked partridge. He was Hugh Gaitskell, not Gaitskill.”

A little more on Mitchison (This is somewhat dated as it first ran in Avenue Victor Hugo Bookshop’s Annotated Browser newsletter):

Naomi Mitchison was born in Scotland in 1897 and died at the age of 101 in 1999. In the USA she isn’t too well known, but I recommend her, even if you have to search for some of her books. Judging by the number of times it’s been brought back into print, the most popular of her historical novels is The Corn King and the Spring Queen. Soho Press have put it out under their Hera Series which includes novels by Cecilia Holland and Gillian Bradshaw.

If historical fiction isn’t your thing, don’t turn up your nose quite yet, she also wrote science fiction (Solution 3, [Feminist Press], Memoirs of a Spacewoman), some of the most enjoyable autobiographies I’ve ever read (You May Well Ask, Small Talk), children’s books (including the wonderful Travel Light), plays (with Lewis Gielgud), poetry, essays, short stories, and biographies; over 70 books in all.

Mitchison was born in Scotland because her mother wanted a woman to attend her at the birth which was difficult to find outside Edinburgh. Despite her proto-feminist leanings her mother never managed to get beyond her Tory beliefs and it wasn’t until Mitchison was older that she realized that she shared her deep Socialist views with her father. Socialism has a long and respectable history in Scotland and does not carry the same negative connotations that the media and populace seem to fear in the USA.

From an early age Mitchison seems to have been very self aware. Excerpts from her early diaries in The Nine Lives of Naomi Mitchison (Virago, 1997) by Jenni Calder and in her own autobiography show her as a learned companion to her older brothers as they study science and try to keep up with their father’s work. Her family lived well. Her father, J.S. Haldane, was a respected scientist and her uncle, Richard Haldane, a cabinet minister during World War I. She lived variously in Scotland and England until moving back to Scotland in 1937 with her husband, the politician Dick Mitchison. She was politically active all her adult life and came to the USA in the 1930s to see how the working class, poor and minorities were faring. She also was well-connected in the arts and political world and put her time into campaigning in support of her beliefs. She believed in sexual freedom, women’s rights and social justice. She was successful enough in her own lifetime to be consistently published but despite that and her family, money problems plagued her well past the usual retirement age.

 



Storyteller: Writing Lessons and More from 27 Years of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop

Mon 8 Aug 2005 - Filed under: Books | 2 Comments| Posted by: intern

Locus Award Winner
Hugo Award Winner

Read Excerpts:

  1. Can Writing Be Taught?
  2. Trivia Vs. Writing Real Stories now available at the Online Writing Workshop.
  3. My Silent Partner at SF Site.

Writers on Clarion

For 27 years, Kate Wilhelm and her husband, Damon Knight, taught at the Clarion Writers’ Workshop, an intensive and ambitious six-week writing program for novice writers, known to participants as “boot camp for writers.”

Part memoir and part writing manual, Storyteller is Wilhelm’s affectionate account of the history of the program and her years there with Damon as mentors and instructors. She relates how Clarion began, explains why workshop participants fear red pencils* and rejoice at the sight of water guns, what she learned, and how she passed a love of the written word on to generations of writers. Storyteller is a gift to all writers from this generous and acclaimed teacher. It includes a special section of writing exercises and advice.

* See page 121 for the origin of “The Red Line of Death.”

Reviews:

“There are many books of writing instruction out there, but what sets Storyteller apart is the sense that Wilhelm really knows students and knows how to teach them to craft a professional story.”
The Oregonian

“A useful, compact, and entertaining guide to writing that is neither bound to a particular genre or market.”
Locus

“This book should be on the reference shelf of every aspiring writer. Not only is it a gift of insight and experience of a wonderful writer but it’s also a fine story of the growth of a renowned writing workshop. Highly recommended.”
SF Revu

“Teaching writing is a balancing act between compassionate encouragement and firm, blunt criticism. Kate is a master of it. The book uses reminisces about the founding, development and running of Clarion to frame a series of practical, plainly stated lessons for the beginning (and professional) writer. I learned a great deal reading it — something that can be accomplished in a deceptively short time, for Kate is also a master of simply and clearly setting out complicated, muddy issues, a skill honed both in her award-winning fiction (Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang is a personal favorite) and in her long years of teaching.”
— Cory Doctorow, BoingBoing

“Oh, but this is a lovely book…. Wilhelm fills Storyteller with lessons about how to write, and just as important, how not to write.”
Strange Horizons

“Its strength, I think, lies in some of the pointers she offers to beginning writers as to help them shorten the time it takes to get published.”
— New Pages

“If you are a budding writer, please spend $16 on this book before raising the money needed to attend Clarion. You’ll get much more out of the workshop if you do.”
— Emerald City

“For such a short book — just barely 192 pages — there is a lot here, and a lot that I’ve never found in other writing books, and it’s all on-point. It’s also delivered as part of the story of one of the most significant institutions in the history of science fiction and fantasy, as told by a true storyteller.”
— Green Man Review

“Satisfying in its own right, presenting an informative, and entertaining, blend of history, memoirs, and writing lessons.”
— Steven Silver

“This book should be on the reference shelf of every aspiring writer. Not only is it a gift of insight and experience of a wonderful writer but it’s also a fine story of the growth of a renowned writing workshop. Highly recommended.”
— SF Revu

“Full of pithy, relevant advice for writers, amusing recollections of the field’s current giants during their early days, and the fullest published account to date of how a revered program was established.”
Scifi Dimensions

Listen to an interview.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • In the Beginning
  • Years Two and Three
  • Two New Homes
  • Those Cryptic Marks
  • Supporters
  • Delegations and Confrontations
  • Let the Wild Rumpus Begin
  • Who Is That Masked Man?
  • Where Am I?
  • What’s Going On?
  • Once Upon a Time
  • Body Count
  • Please Speak Up
  • Beyond the Five W’s
  • The Days
  • Notes and Lessons on Writing
  • Writing Exercises

In 2005 we donated $5 from each sale of Storyteller through our website to the Clarion Foundation. In early 2006 we sent in a check for $850 — thank you readers for helping us help future Clarion Workshop attendees.

Reviews for Wilhelm’s previous books:

Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang:

  • Hugo Award Winner
  • “Richly deserves the praise it won. . . . It richly deserves to be read—or read again—for its insights that remain startlingly fresh.” —L.D. Meagher, CNN.com
  • “As well-crafted and sympathetic as it is scientifically rigorous.”—Nalo Hopkinson, scifi.com
  • “The best novel about cloning written to date.”—Locus
  • “Wilhelm’s cautionary message comes through loud and clear.”—The New York Times

About the Author

Kate WilhelmKate Wilhelm was born in 1928, is the author of more than thirty novels including Where Late the Sweet Bird Sang andThe Unbidden Truth. Her work has been adapted for TV and film and translated into twenty languages. She has been awarded the Prix Apollo, Kurd Lasswitz, Hugo, Nebula, and Locus Awards. In 2003, she was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Her short fiction appeared in landmark anthologies such as Again Dangerous Visions, Orbit, The Penguin Book of Modern Fantasy by Women, and The Norton Book of Science Fiction.

A cofounder of the Clarion Writers’ Workhops, she continues to host monthly writing workshops in Eugene, Oregon.

Photo by Richard B. Wilhelm
Download for print.

An alternate selection of the Science Fiction Book Club.

Links

Clarion. Clarion West.

Credits

Cover image © Corbis.
Download for print.

Previous Readings:

July 8-10, 2005 — Guest of Honor: Readercon, Burlington, MA

May 26-29, 2006 — Guest of Honor, WisCon, Madison, WI



Kate Wilhelm

Mon 8 Aug 2005 - Filed under: Authors | Leave a Comment| Posted by: intern

Kate WilhelmKate Wilhelm was born in 1928, is the author of more than thirty novels including Where Late the Sweet Bird Sang andThe Unbidden Truth. Her work has been adapted for TV and film and translated into twenty languages. She has been awarded the Prix Apollo, Kurd Lasswitz, Hugo, Nebula, and Locus Awards. In 2003, she was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Her short fiction appeared in landmark anthologies such as Again Dangerous Visions, Orbit, The Penguin Book of Modern Fantasy by Women, andThe Norton Book of Science Fiction.
A cofounder of the Clarion Writers’ Workhops, she continues to host monthly writing workshops in Eugene, Oregon.

Photo by Richard B. Wilhelm
Download for print.



Storyteller – Reviews

Mon 8 Aug 2005 - Filed under: Authors | Leave a Comment| Posted by: intern

StorytellerStoryteller: Writing Lessons and More from 27 Years of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop
Kate Wilhelm

* Hugo Award Winner for Best Related Book.
* Locus Award Winner
An alternate selection of the Science Fiction Book Club

Clarion“There are many books of writing instruction out there, but what setsStoryteller apart is the sense that Wilhelm really knows students and knows how to teach them to craft a professional story.”
— The Oregonian

“A useful, compact, and entertaining guide to writing that is neither bound to a particular genre or market.”
— Locus

“Its strength, I think, lies in some of the pointers she offers to beginning writers as to help them shorten the time it takes to get published.”
— New Pages

“If you are a budding writer, please spend $16 on this book before raising the money needed to attend Clarion. You’ll get much more out of the workshop if you do.”
— Emerald City

“For such a short book — just barely 192 pages — there is a lot here, and a lot that I’ve never found in other writing books, and it’s all on-point. It’s also delivered as part of the story of one of the most significant institutions in the history of science fiction and fantasy, as told by a true storyteller.”
— Green Man Review

“Satisfying in its own right, presenting an informative, and entertaining, blend of history, memoirs, and writing lessons.”
— Steven Silver

“This book should be on the reference shelf of every aspiring writer. Not only is it a gift of insight and experience of a wonderful writer but it’s also a fine story of the growth of a renowned writing workshop. Highly recommended.”
— SF Revu

“Teaching writing is a balancing act between compassionate encouragement and firm, blunt criticism. Kate is a master of it. The book uses reminisces about the founding, development and running of Clarion to frame a series of practical, plainly stated lessons for the beginning (and professional) writer. I learned a great deal reading it — something that can be accomplished in a deceptively short time, for Kate is also a master of simply and clearly setting out complicated, muddy issues, a skill honed both in her award-winning fiction (Where Late the Sweet Birds Sangis a personal favorite) and in her long years of teaching.”
— Cory Doctorow,
BoingBoing

“Oh, but this is a lovely book…. Wilhelm fills Storyteller with lessons about how to write, and just as important, how not to write.”
— Strange Horizons

“Full of pithy, relevant advice for writers, amusing recollections of the field’s current giants during their early days, and the fullest published account to date of how a revered program was established.”
— Scifi Dimensions


Reviews for Wilhelm’s previous books:

Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang:

  • Hugo Award Winner
  • “Richly deserves the praise it won. . . . It richly deserves to be read — or read again — for its insights that remain startlingly fresh.”
    — L.D. Meagher, CNN.com
  • “As well-crafted and sympathetic as it is scientifically rigorous.”
    — Nalo Hopkinson, scifi.com
  • “The best novel about cloning written to date.”
    Locus
  • “Wilhelm’s cautionary message comes through loud and clear.”
    The New York Times

And the Angels Sing:

  • “An outstandingly fluent, sensitive writer.


Storyteller Excerpt: Can Writing Be Taught?

Mon 8 Aug 2005 - Filed under: Free Stuff to Read, Novel Excerpts | 1 Comment| Posted by: intern

StorytellerClarionOne of the questions Damon and I returned to often was simply: can writing be taught? There are many writers who say emphatically that the answer is no. I see their point. High school and college creative writing classes are too often a joke, taught by non-writers without a clue about the real world of publishing and what makes for a publishable story in contemporary markets. For most writers struggling alone, the learning curve from the first attempt to write to becoming an accomplished writer is very long; years in many cases. And all the while they are being taught by rejection slips, by trial and error; they are learning what works for them and what doesn’t. Even after they have published a few stories, often they can’t see why one story was accepted and not another.

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The Faery Handbag

Fri 1 Jul 2005 - Filed under: Free Stuff to Read, Short Stories | 14 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

"The Faery Handbag" was originally published in the anthology The Faery Reel.

Magic for BeginnersI used to go to thrift stores with my friends. We’d take the train into Boston, and go to The Garment District, which is this huge vintage clothing warehouse. Everything is arranged by color, and somehow that makes all of the clothes beautiful. It’s kind of like if you went through the wardrobe in the Narnia books, only instead of finding Aslan and the White Witch and horrible Eustace, you found this magic clothing world–instead of talking animals, there were feather boas and wedding dresses and bowling shoes, and paisley shirts and Doc Martens and everything hung up on racks so that first you have black dresses, all together, like the world’s largest indoor funeral, and then blue dresses–all the blues you can imagine–and then red dresses and so on. Pink-reds and orangey reds and purple-reds and exit-light reds and candy reds. Sometimes I would close my eyes and Natasha and Natalie and Jake would drag me over to a rack, and rub a dress against my hand. "Guess what color this is."

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Magic for Beginners

Fri 1 Jul 2005 - Filed under: Books | 2 Comments| Posted by: Gavin

hardcover · 9781931520157

Best of the Decade: Salon, The Onion, HTML Giant, Village Voice.
Best of the Year: Time Magazine, Salon, Village Voice, San Francisco Chronicle, Seattle Times. 

Available in hardcover from Small Beer Press and in paperback and ebook from Random House. (See here for international editions.) The limited edition is sold out. See below for more.

Link’s engaging and funny second collection — call it kitchen-sink magical realism — riffs on haunted convenience stores, husbands and wives, rabbits, zombies, weekly apocalyptic poker parties, witches, superheroes, marriage, and cannons — and includes several new stories. Link is an original voice: no one else writes quite like this.

Each story is illustrated by cover artist Shelley Jackson. The cover is modeled on Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Lady with an Ermine.”

“Her exquisite stories mix the aggravations and epiphanies of everyday life with the stuff that legends, dreams and nightmares are made of, from pop culture to fairy tales. Some of these pieces are very scary, others are immensely sad, many are funny and all of them are written in prose so flawless you almost forget how much elemental human chaos they contain.”
Salon, Best of the Decade

Reviews

“Intricate, wildly imaginative and totally wonderful. Whether or not you think you like fantasy, if you’re a fan of inventive plots and good writing (her use of language will fill you with awe), don’t miss Kelly Link’s collection.”
Nancy Pearl, NPR

“Link’s stories … play in a place few writers go, a netherworld between literature and fantasy, Alice Munro and J.K. Rowling, and Link finds truths there that most authors wouldn’t dare touch.”
Time Magazine

“Link’s writing shimmers with imagination.”
— Salon

Book Sense Pick: “Kelly Link is my favorite new fantasy writer. She mixes up fairy-tale monsters and our modern world to create unique, humane stories that illuminate the joy and pain of everyday stuff. These stories are magic.” –Michael Wells, Bailey-Coy Books, Seattle, WA

Story Prize recommended reading list.
Locus Award winner.
Young Lions Award, Bram Stoker, and World Fantasy Finalist.

(More reviews)

Table of Contents: The Faery Handbag : The Hortlak : The Cannon : Stone Animals : Catskin : Some Zombie Contingency Plans : The Great Divorce : Magic for Beginners : Lull.

Stories from Magic for Beginners have been published in McSweeney’s Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales, Conjunctions, The Dark, and One Story. “Stone Animals” was selected for The Best American Short Stories: 2005. The Faery Handbag” received the Nebula, Locus, and Hugo Awards and was a finalist for the British Science Fiction Association and World Fantasy Awards. “Magic for Beginners” received the Nebula, Locus, and British Science Fiction Association Awards and was a finalist for the Grand Prix de l’Imaginaire, Hugo, Sturgeon, and World Fantasy Award.

The limited edition is now sold out.
Overstock, unnumbered unsigned copies are available for $70.

Hand-numbered and signed by the author and illustrator and includes two tipped-in plates: an enlargement of the title story illustration and a color reproduction of the trade dustjacket painting by Shelley Jackson which is based on “Lady with an Ermine” by Leonardo da Vinci held in The Czartoryskich Museum in Krakow. Printed by Thomson-Shore of Dexter, MI, on 70# Finch Opaque Cream White Smooth paper, with 80# Oatmeal Rainbow Endpapers, Smyth Sewn in Cobalt Blue Pearl Linen Cloth, with a ribbon to keep your place.

October 2, 2008: Released under Creative Commons.
September 30, 2013: Taken down from Creative Commons due to rights sale.

See also: KellyLink.net.



Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 16

Fri 1 Jul 2005 - Filed under: LCRW | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

$5 · 60 pages

Gavin J. Grant: Still.
Kelly Link: Outtern. Tap.
Jedediah Berry: Intern. Distilled.
Gwyneth Merner: Intern. Effervescent.

Another issue of a zine. Printed in 2-point type and taped shut with duct tape to build anticipation (and microscope sales).

Actual zine hoped to have the same size front and back covers. Also, a rich creamy cover, not actually white. As with much of the information on this page, you’ll have to take it on trust unless you get a copy in your hands. Well, except for the few linked things.

Tie-in (and tie on) rosebud wristlets (made of edible rice paper) will be given out with every Veggie Delite Subway sandwich.

fiction
Eric Gregory
— You and I in the Year 2012
Cara Spindler — We Lived in a House
Yoon Ha Lee — Moon, Paper, Scissors
Scott Geiger — The Pursuit of Artemisia Guile
Kat Meads — Reality Goes On Here More or Less
Eric Schaller — Three Urban Folk Tales
John Kessel — The Red Phone
Matthew Kirby — Little Apocalypse
David Lunde — The Grandson of Heinrich Schliemann
Christina Manucy — Cat Whisker Wound
Jenny Ashley — The Perfect Pair
Sean Melican — Gears Grind Down

poetry
Michaela Kahn — village of wolves, Fall Comes to the Central Valley of California
Two Poems by Sandra Lindow
Chris Fox — Scorpions, Scenes
Two Poems by Ursula K. Le Guin

nonfiction
Gwenda Bond — Dear Aunt Gwenda

Tom Berger — Berger on Books: Snow (online only)

people

Jenny Ashley is married to a man with beautiful feet. She lives in San Luis Obispo, CA, and teaches freshmen how to fall in love with words. Her stories and poems have appeared in The Allegheny Review, Mars Hill Review, Oxford Magazine, and The Peralta Press.

Gwenda Bond communicates to us through the local MI-5 dead letter office. She is working on a young adult novel. She is funnier than you. She did not write this bio.

Chris Fox. Aries. Born: Cincinnati, OH. Attended Appalachian State University. Resides: Greensboro, NC. Employed: Benjamin Branch, Greensboro Public Library. Fiction: The Bishop’s House Review, Slave, and the News and Observer. Poetry: Wavelength and Rosebud. Guitar: political ghoul-punk band, Crimson Spectre.

Michaela Kahn is an indentured servant tied to the slaving-meat-wheel of mindless, meaningless labor. She’s heard there’s a ritual you can perform out in the desert with a penny, a piece of yellow legal paper, sage, a fountain pen, mouse-droppings, and the recitation of a few choice phrases that will put an end to global capitalism. She’s currently searching for the correct words.

After his brief stint as the Dalai Lama, John Kessel earned his living exclusively by selling kelp to passengers of the Orange Line in the 14th Street IRT station.

Matthew Kirby lives in Brooklyn, NY. He is a frequent contributor to the film criticism journal Metaphilm.com, and his fiction has appeared in 3rd Bed, Diagram, and The Brooklyn Rail.

Ursula K. Le Guin is the author of twenty novels, ten short story collections, six books of poetry, four volumes of translation (including Angélica Gorodischer’s Kalpa Imperial), and thirteen books for children. She lives in Oregon.

Yoon Ha Lee‘s fiction and poetry have appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Lenox Avenue, Strange Horizons, and Star*Line. She was born in Houston but lacks the accent to prove it. She used to make her own paper dolls.

Sandra Lindow, officially past her 55th birthday, takes the responsibilities of apprentice cronehood seriously. She has published three poetry chapbooks, Rooted in the Earth, The Heroic Housewife Papers, and Revision Quest, and a longer collection, A Celebration of Bones. She is working on a chapbook, Walking the Labyrinth: Poetry of Conflict and Resolution.

Christina Manucy is directs exhibitions on the nature of light and weeble-wobbles. She has been neither to Ireland nor Egypt and is kind to cats. She lives in Baltimore among the “Hons” with her sculptor husband.

Kat Meads‘s novel, Sleep, was on the 2004 long list of works recommended by the Tiptree Award jury. She lives in California.

Cara Spindler lives in Michigan and teaches high school English. The story is for Morgan, who shot god in the sky, and asked about the netherworld dreams.

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet Iteration 16, July 2005. This zine is supposed to go out each June and November (but wasn’t this also supposed to be an occasional outburst? What’s the occasion?) from Small Beer Press, 176 Prospect Ave., Northampton, MA 01060 info-at-lcrw.net www.lcrw.net/lcrw $5 per single issue or $20/4. Contents © the respective authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, &c all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. Apologies for the lack of margin space. We keep expecting to increase the margins and page count. The economic bullet that would entail refuses to be bit. Please take your copy of this zine apart and paste on an extra inch of paper all round. This issue brought to you by reduced personal freedoms, a scandal proof monkey, and water, rising waters. Read. Revolt! As ever, thanks. Paradise Copies, 30 Craft Ave., Northampton, MA 01060 413-585-0414



Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet No. 15

Sat 1 Jan 2005 - Filed under: LCRW | Leave a Comment| Posted by: Gavin

$5 ~ 68 pages

Kelly Link: Lady.
Gavin J. Grant: Tiger.
Jedediah Berry: Drone.

Reviews

“Elegant ain’t typically an adjective you’re liable to find in Zinesville but lemme tell ya: Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet is nothing if not elegant. Just check out the Victorian-era lass riding a tiger that adorns the front cover. And it doesn’t stop there. Lady Churchill’s is a beautifully produced zine, jam-packed with poems, short stories, features, film reviews and other curiosities. There is enough variety here to satisfy the most sullen hardback and, most importantly, Lady Churchill’s cocks the hammer in favour of the reader by keeping the pieces short, sharp and easy to read. In terms of highlights, Michael Northrop’s “The Beard of God” is definitely up there. A soggy tale of a camping trip gone to piss, Northrop does a great job of balancing the cynicism of adulthood with the wonderment of youth, all while saving the sappiness for the pine trees. Lawrence Schimel’s “A Well-Dressed Wolf” is another treat-and an illustrated treat at that. Through some nifty Sara Rojo’s supplied cartoons, Schimel picks apart Aesop’s atypical wolf one snout at a time. And he’s right-why can’t a wolf be a fox–I mean, a bird–um, a broad, a dame, a jezebel. Lady Churchill’s also earns brownie points for including full bios of all contributors to close things out. It’s a little thing but it’s a damn nice thing, and a damn nice zine overall.”
—Cameron Gordon, Broken Pencil

fiction

Karen Russell — Help Wanted
Sarah Micklem — “Eft” or “Epic”
Bruce McAllister — Mary
John Trey — At the Rue des Boulangers Bridge Cafe
Benjamin Rosenbaum & Paul Melko — Collaborations . . .
Michael Northrop — The Beard of God
Ellen M. Rhudy — Crown Prince
Sarah Monette — The Half-Sister
Geoffrey Goodwin — Dear Miss Wonderment
Richard Parks — Lord Goji’s Wedding
Stepan Chapman — The Life of Saint Serena
Mark Rich — Nicholas
Amy Sisson — gray’s boadicea: unlikely patron saints, no. 4
Neal Chandler — The Truck

poetry

Nan Fry — Four Poems
Mary A. Turzillo — FAQ
Carol Smallwood — Three Poems
Suzanne Fischer — Three Poems

nonfiction

William Smith — The Film Column: The Tenant
Some Writers — Some Records
Gwenda Bond — Dear Aunt Gwenda

comic

Lawrence Schimel and Sara Rojo — The Well-Dressed Wolf

people

Also in this issue ads for books and chapbooks, Trunk Stories, Jubilat, Odyssey, a tiny thing about Bill Sikes, a tiny legal call for non-violent Jefferson-approved revolution, a plea to subscribers to send us their new address if they move, and The Future of Soul to Soul and other Sound Systems We Loved and Then Which Disappeared Or Became Somewhat Uninteresting.

people

Gwenda Bond advises the public from Lexington, KY. Despite the title of her web journally thing (Shaken & Stirred), she’d generally prefer a glass of white wine, thank you. And a book. She liked that NBA finalist Godless, have you read that yet?

Neal Chandler is a former soldier, missionary, emergency room orderly, furniture store owner, German professor, editor, and chauffeur. He teaches in the English Department at Cleveland State University, coordinates creative writing, and helped create NEOMFA, a new graduate writing program spanning four universities. He has published essays, short stories, and a story collection, Benediction. He and his wife live in Shaker Heights, OH. Their eight children live everywhere else.

Stepan Chapman, sub-chairman of research for the Institute for Further Study and manager of the Aphasia Gorge Wild Insect Preserve of Waxwall, Arizona, has published historical studies in such scholarly journals as The Baffler, Happy, and McSweeney’s Quarterly, and in such anthology series as Orbit, Leviathan, and Polyphony. His major works are The Troika and Dossier.

Suzanne Fischer lives in Minneapolis, where she bicycles all winter long. She is currently writing a dissertation on wax museums.

Nan Fry teaches in the Academic Studies Program at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, D.C., and is the author of a book of poetry, Relearning the Dark. Her poems have also appeared in Plainsong, Calyx, and the anthologies The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror and Poetry in Motion from Coast to Coast.

Sometimes the stories Geoffrey H. Goodwin touches get a little messed up.

Steve Lieber is the cover artist. His groovy comics includelots of big-company things, Family Circle with Sean Stewart, and Me and Edith Head with Sara Ryan. He’s very nice and will illustrate for you if you ask nicely and so on.

Bruce McAllister has had fiction in Omni, Asimov’s, F&SF, literary quarterlies and “year’s best” anthologies since the ’70s. He was away from writing for most of the ’90s, and is happy to be back. He has three wonderful children (Liz, Ben and Annie), is married to the choreographer Amelie Hunter, and, after an eternity in academe, now works as a writing coach and book and screenplay consultant.

Sarah Micklem worked as a graphic designer for twenty years but was pestered by the idea that she ought to write something. She wrote on and off for more years than she cares to admit before completing a novel, Firethorn. She is now working on the sequel. “Eft” or “Epic” is her first published short fiction.

After twenty-five years, Sarah Monette is no longer a student. What, she wonders, will she do with herself now?

Michael Northrop grew up in the northwestern corner of Connecticut, which is very nice, before inexplicably moving to New York City, which is fraught with peril. He works as an editor at Time Inc., and his fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Snake Nation Review and McSweeney’s (web).

Richard Parks‘ first pro sale was published in Amazing Stories in 1981. In 1994, after a 13-year hiatus, his second story appeared in Science Fiction Age. Since then his work has appeared in Asimov’s, Realms of Fantasy, Weird Tales, and Black Gate. His first collection, The Ogre’s Wife: Fairy-Tales for Grownups, was a World Fantasy Award finalist.

Ellen M. Rhudy just bought a guitar. She knows how to play three chords and spends most of her time playing these chords or fondling her guitar. Her fiction has appeared in Hanging Loose and Smokelong Quarterly. She edits a lit zine, Frothing at the Mouth, and is currently writing a zine about working in a Christian bookstore. She lives in a very very small room with some books and dirty clothes.

Mark Rich writes, “Mark Rich writes all the time but still has that basic insecurity that he is not really a real writer. He is the author of some books (Foreigners & Other Familiar Faces, Lifting, Funny Gace, Baby Boomer Toys, Toys A-Z), but that’s something different. Right now he’s writing about himself . . . a further cause of discontent. Is this what he should be doing? Is all writing this unsettling and unbalancing?” He draws pictures, too, and has little to say about that.

Karen Russell is a girl who lives in New York and likes to write about alligator wrestlers and sleep-disordered kids and the moon. She hopes you like her story. It’s the first one she’s published.

Lawrence Schimel & Sara Rojo have published over a dozen children’s books in Spanish and/or English such as No Hay Nada Como el Original, Andrés and the Copyists, & Misterio En El Jardín. They also create graphic novels for older readers, such as the full-color Mixed Blessings (Germany, Fall ’05) and the b&w romantic vampire comedy A Coffin for Two (U.S., Spring ’06). They live mostly in Madrid, except when Sara is in Cadiz or Lawrence is in New York.

Amy Sisson is a librarian of the non-shushing variety who was recently transplanted to Houston, TX, where she lives with husband Paul Abell and a collection of ex-parking-lot cats. She is a member of the Clarion West (2000). She invites you to visit her website for more about the unlikely patron saints.

Before turning to fiction and poetry, Carol Smallwood‘s books such as Michigan Authors were published by Scarecrow, Libraries Unlimited, and others. Her work has been in The Detroit News and dozens more; forthcoming in Meridian Anthology of Contemporary Poetry 2005, Mœbius, Parnassus Literary Journal, Poetry Motel, Zillah. In 2004 she appeared in Who’s Who in America and was nominated for the Pushcart Prize.

John Trey attempts to exploit whatever meager talents he possesses from an old house in a suburb in the midwest, where he keeps all brooms locked safely in a closet. His fiction has appeared in LCRW, Spellbound, MarsDust, and Fortean Bureau. When not writing, reading, or critiquing, he often can be found playing with his daughter, listening to jazz, or pondering the mysteries of invisibility.

Mary A. Turzillo‘s novel, An Old-Fashioned Martian Girl, was serialized in Analog from July-November 2004. She won a Nebula for her novelette, “Mars Is No Place for Children.” If you sense an obsession with Mars, it might be because her husband, Geoff Landis, is a Mars scientist. She is also obsessed with death, but she likes Mars much better.

William Smith publishes Trunk Stories from Brooklyn, NY, where one day there will be a Grand Sichuan International. Until then, he will occasionally make the trip over the river. Besides publishing, managing a bookshop, and writing about films, he is a paper artist.

LCRW 15, art by Steve LieberLCRW 15, back

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, No.15 January 2005. This zine usually goes out each June and November from Small Beer Press, 176 Prospect Ave., Northampton, MA 01060 [email protected] www.lcrw.net/lcrw $5 per single issue or $20/4. This time apologies for the recent US election which froze the zine solid. Much chipping and melting has led to the appearance of this in your hands. May the president be similarly chipped away. Contents © the authors. All rights reserved. Submissions, requests for guidelines, &c all good things should be sent to the address above. No SASE: no reply. For external use only. This issue suitable for vegetarians (thanks, Henry) but produced in a facility where nuts, etc. are processed. As ever, thanks. Printed by Quantum Graphix, 2130 Watterson Trail, Louisville, KY 40299 502-493-5933.